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Video Whiteboard: 3000 mile computer tune up

IT pros know that computers require regular maintenance. Unfortunately, many end users do not. In the following At the Whiteboard video, Agent Peterson of the Geek Squad explains how to keep your computer running efficiently.

IT pros know that computers require regular maintenance. Unfortunately, many end users do not. In the following ZDNet At the Whiteboard video, Agent Peterson of the Geek Squad explains how to keep your computer running efficiently.

Peterson's tips shouldn't be news to IT pros, but they're good advice for the end-user. Share this video with the tech novices that you support. You may get one less support call.

Note: The content for this video was sponsored and provided by Geek Squad.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

14 comments
Wcoyote1
Wcoyote1

There was actually a trick that I forget where I learned. Believe it or not, ladies nylons actually work wonders for keeping dust out. The material is porous enough for air to flow freely, but meshed tight enough to keep dust at bay for the most part. Putting the nylon material over your air intake ports cuts down on dust quite a bit. Just one caveat to this ... don't let your wife/significant other find you going through her nylon drawer. Or worse yet, cutting up her good nylons to make intake covers.

ldajnowski
ldajnowski

Have been to friends homes after the Geek Squad has visited and found that the maintenance done was way under par. One example: Ran a full Virus/Malware scan using AVG Internet Security and found hundreds of Trojans, etc. Maybe the name should be changed to "Green Squad" where Green equals inexperience.

DONC314
DONC314

I'm not a fan of Geek Squad. In my opinion they really aren't very knowledgeable. This video is OK but it only tells about half the story. I guess you are supposed to bring your computer to them to have the job done right? In any case here is a link that may be of use to the newbee: http://computerspeedforfree.blogspot.com/

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

and lose all my data than let Geek Squad fiddle in my machines.

meg7
meg7

This article didn't take into account registry problems. Doing that stuff will help, but it will not keep your computer running like it just came out of the box. Formatting, installing the OS and applications fresh, applying all the patches and restoring your data every 6 months or once a year will work better. Yes, it will takes more time, but in the long run, you'll be better off. Now you've addressed most anything that could have gone wrong with your software. Peace

hstone111
hstone111

very good, concise explanation. I was running a "clean sweep" app by norton that seemed to clean out dead wood. Suddenly the program stopped running after completing the sweep and the only way I could restart was by actually turning power off and back on. I can't find the app on any of my backup dics and a www search was not fruitful. Any suggetions (PS I'm still running ME2000- so Bill Gates is no help anymore) Ron

CPPCrispy
CPPCrispy

This is a Windows XP tune up video. The process for getting to the Defragmenting and Updates programs are still the same but the icons and the actual programs are different in Vista. P.S. Don't even try to run Vista on 64 MB of memory!

MGP2
MGP2

At work, we had our maintenance department build shelves five feet off the floor. That's where everyone's tower is located. Now they only require dust removal from the outer case about once every 3-4 months and virtually none inside. Before that, they'd need to be blown out about once a month. I did the same thing with my home pc. I moved it from the bottom shelf of my mobile desk to the top shelf. The difference is incredible.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

While some dust still collects, no way is it near the amount that collected in those towers when they were floor bound.

ron.dondelinger
ron.dondelinger

Canned air, like bottled water, is a product that never should have made it to the consumer market. You don't want to disperse the dust and allow it to re-settle where it may. You want to collect and eliminate it. And the common household vacuum appliance, with its detachable hose and nozzle attachments, is the perfect tool. A Shop-Vac vacuum can be re-configured as a electric-powered over-sized "can of air", for those who really feel the need. Or just drag the PC out to the garage, and have at it with the air compressor.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

used in concert with canned air takes care of collecting the dispersed dust.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I remember learning the same thing with an air purifier that specified that it should be placed three or more feet off the ground so it could keep air moving through the filters rather than clogging it up quickly with the most dence amount of dust at ground level. Five feet up should definately have some effect. I've also seen boxes built to encase the entire tower and with air holes cut and covered with filtering foam. My poor home machine is about two and a half feet off the ground but it's in a dusty basement room so it still builds up.

jeff.allen
jeff.allen

I remember back when I first started working on Unix servers (early 80's) the machines I worked on had their air intakes at the top at the back, the theory being that most dust was found at floor level. This is an example of design concepts that get forgotten - or overlooked for the sake of design, then "rediscovered" some years later.

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