Windows optimize

Video: Windows 7 and Vista tweak: Select multiple files with checkboxes

Bill Detwiler shows you how to select multiple files in Windows 7 and Vista with the "Use Check Boxes to Select Items" feature.

For years, Windows users have used a two-handed procedure for selecting multiple files that weren't next to each other. With one hand they would hold down the CTRL key and with the other they would click each file's name.

However, with the often-overlooked checkbox feature in Windows Vista and Windows 7, you can select multiple files with one mouse-equipped hand. In this week's TR Dojo episode, I show you how.

For those who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window or check out Mark Kaelin's article, "Quick Tip: Select files in Windows Explorer with checkboxes."

You can also sign up to receive the latest TR Dojo lessons through one or more of the following methods:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

9 comments
mwb78
mwb78

I'll add my Thanks! also. This is a great tip for accessibility. I have a colleague who has the use of only one hand. Ctrl- and Shift-clicks are impossible. This is a great alternative. And I kind of like it myself.

ScarF
ScarF

Thanks, Bill. Great tip, never verified by me.

Elvis.GodZilla.777
Elvis.GodZilla.777

Thanks Bill, I hate Windows 7 and like XP, but that said this video tip does ease the pain with the offering of something useful. PS. nice bloopers reel.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

If you're tired of the old CTRL-and-Click method of selecting multiple non-contiguous files, then I have the perfect Windows tweak. In this week's episode of TR Dojo, I show how to select files in Windows 7 and Vista with the "Use Check Boxes to Select Items" feature. When we originally published this tip, several member lamented the fact that it doesn't work on Windows XP. While there are still lots of people hanging on to the 10-year-old operating system, more and more organizations are finally moving on. What's happening in your company? Are you moving to Windows 7? If so, what does the migration strategy look like? Are you rolling it out to existing desktops or just new machines? Take the poll and let us know. Original post and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=2102

Sunny Puddle
Sunny Puddle

Thanks! that is a great feature - I wonder why it isn't on by default? Ahh.., the mystery that is Windows.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

I'm really glad to found the tip helpful and enjoyed the bloopers!

conorst
conorst

Tha nks Bill, Love you video's but this is a particularly useful one. PS I love Windows 7, it's a vast improvement on XP which in itself was great.