Hardware

Are you an early adopter, or do you wait and see?


From time to time -- no scrub that, all the time -- things change in the industry. New hardware breakthroughs, new operating systems, new software, new peripherals and updated software all appear with frightening regularity. A quick Google search will reveal peripherals and software to assist with virtually any activity you could conceivably imagine. I have even seen knitting machines that install as printers, allowing you to design a sweater on screen, load the yarn and "print" your winter wardrobe in minutes.

Cast your mind back 15 years, would you have believed that you would be using hard disks with capacities of over 100 GB and 1 GB of RAM memory in a regular desktop machine? Of course not -- I can recall when a colleague called Sean build a new Pentium 133 machine for himself and included 32 MB of RAM and two 1-GB hard drives. We thought he was losing his marbles but he was enacting the buzzword of the day, "future-proofing."

We used to over-build PCs to a ridiculous degree and hang the tag "future-proof" on them, only to be made to look stupid as the typical spec for a PC swept past our designs in a matter of months.

Nowadays I like to sit back and see what happens. In this way I was spared the indignity of a Zip drive, the four-speed CD-ROM drive, and similar Betamax moments.

It is with this in mind that I am waiting for others to find out how Vista will turn out. By the time I get there most of the known problems will have fixes posted on the various forums (or should that be forae?) that concern themselves with such matters.

There are those who need to keep right up to the minute with technology, others feel that they need to, some enjoy the challenge, some people are too busy to follow the trends, preferring to go for solid reliability twinned with tried and tested solutions.

Which camp do you fall into?

17 comments
art
art

Beta for planning and testing, Vista nowhere. linux! Linux!! LINUX!!! We are using the Vista interface changes as a rationale for switching from WinXP to Linux. If the users have to get used to difference, why not something more stable and open? My version of open office opens ms office 2007 docs, ms office 2000-03 don't. So I'm using two computers with a kvm, one with a really stable OS and apps (Novell Suse 10.1) and another with Kubuntu Gutsy which I have been testing for a couple of months and just went beta last week.

Teufelhund
Teufelhund

I work in a shop that needs to be up 24/7/365. Everything needs to work right out of the box - there's no time for excessive tuning ("excessive" varies by application and/or device).

BruceAnd
BruceAnd

I equipped several customer's machines with both XP and Vista. So far the vote is XP 10, Vista Zero. Have sold no machines with Vista. Had other customer's call and want help with Vista. My suggestion is to go back to where they bought the machine and ask them for help or take the machine back. The sellers neglected to tell the customers they were getting a whole new system that was hard to understand. I now wait a year before selling any new OS's from Microsoft.

yobtaf
yobtaf

But keep in mind that I'm not n IT professional, so when I run into a bug there are no ramifications. There were definite benefits and frustrations to being a couple of years ahead of the curve. One frustration happened around 1991 when a TV commercial producer wanted me to film a Coke against a blue-screen. When I suggested that it could be done much easier with CGI they almost fired me. Today this is the norm.

josh_trow
josh_trow

I usually let things happen, but occasionally I have to be on the cutting edge. Currently, my one "bleeding edge" item is my operating system. Not only do I have Vista Ultimate, I got the x64 version. That has caused such a hassle sometimes, however I generally have no qualms with my choice.

lastchip
lastchip

I saw enough of Vista in the first few hours of receiving my new laptop (pre-loaded) to know I NEVER want to use that system. The impression I'm getting (and it's growing stronger each day) is Vista is a flop - big time and will probably ultimately be seen as a rival to Win ME for the prize for worst ever operating system. PCLinuxOS on the same machine is significantly faster and a delight to use. 'nough said!

Joe_R
Joe_R

I'm usually one to go with the leading edge, and quite often, the dull blade by being one of the last to jump on some technological bandwagon. I went into the cell phone arena kicking and screaming, refusing to get one for lack of need. It was only when my company offered to pay for it did I finally capitulate -- and even then, I should have refused. I still don't have an ipod, not even my kids' hand-me-down. And rabbit ears on my television aren't really that bad -- but I will admit, I hate not having cable since my home-town Colorado Rockies are still playing baseball (very good baseball) well into October, and I have to listen to their games on the radio. (But that does give the ball game a bit of a nostalgic feel to it.) At least the World Series games will be on network television. However, I'm sure bleeding with my recent upgrade to Vista, or at least I was. I think I have all the bleeding stopped, and the wounds are healing nicely. Even with this, however, the upgrade was necessary only because I skipped Windows XP entirely, and our application demands required the upgrade. So I suppose I'm mostly half leading edge and half dull blade, with a small percentage set aside for those times when I find myself taking some wounds for the cause. It's a tough job, I know, but somebody's got to do it.

royhayward
royhayward

I always have an OS that has been out for a while at home. I need the OS to work so I let others find out what is wrong and how to fix it first. Hardware too. But with applications that I use to make a living, I try to get the betas of things that I am considering. I don't mean office products, but knowing the latest DB and ETL tools that go with it is how I live. So I get the trials and betas of those when I can. I mean, I can only type so fast, but knowing a tool that will load billions of records in a second is going to help make me money. (do I sound greedy?) Now if I got paid to just try stuff out, that might be different.......

Joe_R
Joe_R

You said that you always have an OS that has been out for a while, you need need the OS to work, so you let others find out what is wrong and how to fix it first. In regards to Windows Vista, you're welcome.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Once upon a time, I had to have all the latest and greatest. I did beta test for my companies products (encryption tools, video conferencing,cell technology) as well as testing tech for my companies users (web browsers, new HW, security software etc). I was a goodie monster par excellance, I had the Newton prototype before most. But later jobs I worked at companies who were content to be behind the curve. They let other people adopt, and they watched the results. We were usually one version behind in OS and Office suite, as well as versions of Oracle Financials etc. I saw the wisdom. Today we never sell our customers anything that hasn't hit SP1. We are not selling them VISTA PCs till January. And thats fine with me. James

Joe_R
Joe_R

We were always one (or two or three or more) versions behind, both operating systems and applications. With one driving the other, however, I recently found myself in the position of simply not having a choice.

Jaqui
Jaqui

actually I wait until I have need of it before I buy it. and if it comes from MS, I never need it.

jdclyde
jdclyde

Bought my boys some MP3 players for Christmas. It didn't say Windows XP only (before Vista came out). I took them back. If it isn't just a fancy thumb drive, I don't want it. If the manufacturer is willing to alienate users based on their OS, they are not someone I am willing to do business with.

Jaqui
Jaqui

I started contacting the manufacturers of cell phones today.. asking if they have one with only telephone and phone book features, since calendars, cameras, internet / messaging / email, games ... are reason to NOT buy a particular model. Nokia suggested using the find feature on their website, which I already had. everything their website shows has bloat features I will not pay for. [ and Nokia is the only one to respond so far ]

john.bond.za
john.bond.za

I've a cheap Nokia 1110, costs about US$37.00 including local taxes in South Africa that is just a phone and phone book (clock, alarm clock). It even has those old ring tones. The manufacture date inside the phone is March 07, ?Made in China?. I had my previous 3 phone stolen and as the thieves usually beat you up (and kill in some of the thefts), I wanted something I can whip out and hand over in a hurry. In the latest incident that appeared to be the start of a mugging and theft, I pulled the phone out but the black guys just laughed. The phone wasn?t even suitable to steal...

jgalen
jgalen

Look at the Nokia 1112. That is about as basic as they are made.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

The bigger the screen the bigger the display ratio the bigger the frames.The HDTV will read the file and adjust the display ratio accordingly.I suspect that this would be the video file's header file.If the file's screen resolution is 800x600 pixels and the TV is 1280x1024 the file will be stretched to fit.The color quality could be 8,16,or 32 bit or more.A single frame in HDTV could be two Mb or more.I see the frame rate as an unlimited variable.Perhaps in the future we will see frames per second in the thousands.The HDTV set would read the file for frame rate and play it back accordingly.Big frames and high frame rates make for a very clear or high definition picture.HDTV never connects or buffers it just plays.Now which set to buy---

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