Hardware

Are you using virtualization on the desktop?

Justin James says that he likes to use virtual machines on the desktop to experiment with new configurations of operating systems. Take this quick poll to let us know if your shop is using virtual machines on the desktop.

Over the past few years, virtualization has taken the server room by storm. IT pros are also using virtual machines on the desktop but for different reasons.

I like to use virtual machines to experiment with new configurations of operating systems. At our company, we maintain a library of virtual machines of common desktop configurations to test our software. Other companies use virtual machines on the desktop to isolate risky applications from the rest of the OS or to help them test patches or beta products.

Take this quick poll to let the TechRepublic community know if (and how) you're using virtualization on the desktop.

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

9 comments
tinyang73
tinyang73

I use it as a tool to help support users. It allows me to run any OS on my machine I want, then when a user calls in for help with a different OS, I can just fire up my virtual version of their OS and recreate their problem or step them through a process or whatever they need.

bladeoz
bladeoz

It is a great way to test multiple versions of browsers in site design and programming. Also, it is a good way to cram in a Centos installation on a Windows system to create a small web host for testing server-side coding.

angel63363
angel63363

Do you know how to set up a Linus Enterprise Server 9 on a virtual PC? I have to load this system to my virtual pc but only have Microsoft Virtual PC and need to load the Cd to it. I am using Windows Home Vista as my operating system and I think that is causing my problems. Please Help if you can. Thanks Angelina Fricke- Kaplan Student taking Information Technology

spearson@8herons.com
spearson@8herons.com

I assume you are referring to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9. Here is some help for running it on Virtual PC -- http://www.softpanorama.org/VM/suse_on_microsoft_virtual_pc.shtml If you are running it on a laptop, read the tip about emulated disk performance. It will make a big difference. You will be better off with a fixed-size disk image for your Enterprise Linux install. This is regardless of whether you use Virtual PC or VMWare. From the experience of other students where I am going to school at (for network admin), if you are running Vista, you might need at least 3 gig of RAM in your machine, more if you are going to have two or more VMs running at the same time. Good luck at school! P.S. Apparently, from looking around the web, Virtual PC is "unsupported" on Vista Home Premium, but it will still install and run if you just ignore the warning message(s). See people's experiences below. http://www.computeractive.co.uk/computeractive/q-and-a/2229671/pc-help-versions-vista-virtual http://channel9.msdn.com/forums/Coffeehouse/252439-Virtual-PC-2007-too-good-for-Home-Premium/

darrel.rebmann
darrel.rebmann

You need to install additional packages (if Linus Enterprise is even supported), download and instsall Windows Virtual Server but you will also need IIS installed on your host system, or download and install VMWare Server (it is free and has no time limit)and with that you can easily install Linus Enterprise.

Justin James
Justin James

How are you using virtualization on the desktop, or are you not using it at all? J.Ja

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

That way we have standardized training "machines" no matter where we go! We also us it for testing and for basic builds to see how things will function.

Justin James
Justin James

The first time I encountered a VM was for training purposes. Unfortunately, not only was it 2006, but like all training machines, there were a bit old, so the performance was miserable. That was a lesson too: if you are going to use VMs for training, make sure that if this is training for people external to your company (and in this case, it was), make sure that the PCs can handle it well, or else it shows your application is a very poor light! :) J.Ja

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Most training VMs, at a minimum are running Win2k3 with AD, DHCP, DNS, MSSQL2k5, IIS, .Net x.x, and the vendor apps...It's gonna be slow, but people accept that and realize that you have to have SOME way to emulate the live environment, even if it's on desktop class machines running server class stuff ;-)

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