Hardware optimize

Essential items for your toolbox

My toolbox weighs a shoulder-wrenching amount, yet most of the time I use the same few tools. From time to time, I force myself to sort through the box to remove some of the hardware that makes the box so hard to lift and carry around.

My toolbox weighs a shoulder-wrenching amount, yet most of the time I use the same few tools, only occasionally pulling out one of my other tools for a specialized job. From time to time, I force myself to sort through the box to remove some of the hardware that makes the box so hard to lift and carry around.

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Today, as I struggled up the fifth flight of stairs with a laptop case slung over my shoulder and the toolbox dragging me backward, I resolved to stop after the job and try to find out what was causing the problem. One of my customers who needed to move the box in order to get to the photocopier dragged it toward the edge of the table and was shocked when she got to the edge and gravity took over.

“Good Heavens, Jeff, what have you got in there -- a body?”

A brief investigation revealed that I was carrying:

  • 15 Phillips screwdrivers
  • nine assorted flat-bladed screwdrivers
  • a file
  • a set of socket wrenches
  • 3 assorted spring hooks
  • 2 soft-headed hammers
  • a Ball pein hammer
  • a 500 gram weight
  • 37 ball point pens
  • 6 empty inkjet cartridges
  • a bundle of cleaning rags
  • 9 USB memory sticks
  • a null modem cable (When did I last use that?)
  • a network cable tester
  • a broken modem board
  • 14 empty plastic bags
  • a half-eaten chocolate bar
  • a bundle of old delivery notes
  • a bag of cable ties
  • a PSTN line tester

I could go on. The total came to about 40 pounds. The problem is that when I finish a job, everything gets thrown into the box as I tidy up, and from time to time, it catches up with me and I suddenly realize that I have been carrying a load of rubbish around. After a while the box becomes too heavy to move easily and I find myself leaving it in the car and selecting the tools I am likely to need for the job. As you can imagine, I am not always right, which results in a lot of walking to and from to fetch things. While this is just what my doctor ordered to get my fitness up to a standard that he would find acceptable, it isn’t efficient. I had to take some time out to tip out the contents and pick out only those things that really had a right to be in there. In the process I rediscovered a number of lost treasures, including a pocketknife that I thought I had lost, my ID card, and a lifetime supply of circlips.

I know we are always being asked to do things “when we have a free moment,” but if you, like me, have a toolbox that you drag from place to place, tip it all out and start again. It will save you a lot of effort in the long run.

After a lot of such messing around, I have decided to create different toolboxes, one for lightweight general use and another for the more complicated tasks. Since not all of my work is PC based, I have to deal with modem connectivity, mechanical paper handling, weight calibration and a raft of other tasks. The idea is to configure the trunk of my car like Thunderbird 2, with different pods containing different equipment for all the various tasks.

What should each box contain and why? How do I balance weight with functionality?

I would be very interested in hearing what you think. What must-have tool do you always have on hand?

77 comments
TBBrick
TBBrick

Only thing I did not see was this screwdriver. Most multi-heads I've seen have different tips or shafts you insert into the base. Too easy to loose the tips. This screwdriver has three Phillips and three chisel shafts that are enclosed in the base. It has a twistable plastic head with a hole for the desired shaft to slide through. The shaft then slides into the center of the base where it stays until you remove it. As the shafts can't slide out, no worries on losing them. It's the one tool I refuse to loan.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Plus some extra "as needed" tools. Bag 1 is the general use bag. It contains the tools I will need on almost 90% of my calls: three sizes of Phillips screwdrivers, two sizes of standard screwdrivers, three nutdrivers, regular and miniature needlenose pliers, side cutters, tape measure, multimeter, outlet tester, zip ties, electrical tape, an IEC 320 15A power cord, and an IEC 320 accessory power cord. It comes in at about 4 pounds Bag 2 is the high-power, and, at about 20 pounds, heavy bag. This bag has a more complete selection of screwdrivers, nutdrivers, and pliers, as well as the specialty tools I need for scale work. It also includes adjustable wrenches, metric and standard hex keys, Torx drivers, soldering iron, electrical crimping tool, cleaning solvents (alcohol, lighter fluid, and Goof-off), more electrical tape, and yes, the hammer. Bag 3 is the network/telecom bag: butt set, tone generator/detector, Cat 5 and fiber continuity testers, test phone, 66/110 punch-down tool, cable crimper and connectors, more zip ties, flat satin and UTP cable, I also carry a socket set, fish tape, fish pole, a small step-stool, and the most important tool of all, a camp chair :) , in the van.

reisen55
reisen55

I purchased a Simpletech SATA drive, usb connect, about a year plus ago and the 320 gb died a bad death after four falls off a desk. Buried it. But I kept the shell and a trip to MicroCenter resulted in a 500gb drive which I treat with far more care. AND THIS IS ESSENTIAL for a wide range of things, plus a family of SATA drives on my shelf. Offsite backup, application storage, etc. Carry everything software with you and carry tons of client data for offsite storage back. GHOST images. This is a must-have for an serious technician. Secondly, a pocket pair of 2.5 gb drives in USB shells far outshine a 16gb USB key. The latter are too damn easy to lose and client data lost is a client lost. Absolutely ESSENTIAL to carry hard drives of large capacity with you to client sites.

blackepyon01
blackepyon01

-Laptop computer, cause I know it works while their computer(s) may not -Cat5e crossover cable (For direct connecting laptop with client machine, most 10/100 switches can tell the difference between cable types so it works as a patch if going to a switch or router) -Boot CD with Partition Magic, Ghost and other utilities -USB stick (4GB+) with essential tools/utilities -multi-bit screwdriver -multimeter

mlweekle
mlweekle

My tool box is just the opposite of yours and I find that about the only time I need something else is when some gorilla has super-tightened the screws and you almost need a jack hammer to get them loose. I have a small pouch that is 3" wide and 8" tall with a closure flap. I has two sizes of philips and flat-head screwdrivers, 1 pair of needle-nose pliers, a pair of small diagonal-cutting pliers, one pair of surgical forceps, and a pen. It weighs about a quarter of a pound. (I used to be like you and would have to clean out my tool box periodically. Not any more!). (I now do a lot of PC/Network installation and repair for friends and community charity groups. It keeps me pretty busy).

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

It's amazing how many items in my toolkit the TSA considers a "weapon", which means no carry-on. You can't even take a screwdriver anymore. (I guess they're afraid I'll disassemble the smoke detector in the lavatory) I either keep a spare set of tools at my regular destination, or just suck it up and check the bag.

rickcunningham3
rickcunningham3

I just carry a small reversible screwdriver in my pocket. You know Phillips on one end and flat head on the other.

64molson
64molson

I used to have a Utilikey --- until I forgot about after 9/11 & tried to get through the checkpoint at the Phoenix airport. The TSA clown was amused by it & wanted to keep it!! Two weeks later I saw an interview with a TSA offical showing this new and dangerous weapon. Made me want to cry.

jwebfoot2togo
jwebfoot2togo

The two essentials I take fit in my back pocket and weigh next to nothing. A four way srew driver wto is a little better and a pair of needle nose pliers. I can do half my repairs with those two items.

iconoclastic
iconoclastic

Mike's bag of holding (XPS laptop backpack): a laptop, sometimes 2 USB cables, various multi card reader digital camera (proof!) PDA insulated can cozy (for Mt Dew... duh) ethernet cable(s) usb wireless G adapter Tums, Advil and various other legal pharmceuticals mini-screwdriver set Pelican VB3 LED clip light (you need one!) small mirror on retractable rod multi-tool with wrench multi-tool with plyers tiny screws things safety pins paper clips binder clips magnifying glass 2x sided tape zip ties twist ties roll of velcro tube of graphite lubricant tiny usb mouse with retractable cord (great for airplanes) encrypted 8G USB key bootable 8G USB key 5 colors of Sharpies pen, pencil notepad Post It notes dental pick microfiber cloths little zip-lock bags tissue pack CD case (utilities, blank CDs/DVDs, Princess Bride widescreen edition) headphones ear buds USB phone charger 1 or 2 Cliff bars bottled water tape measure razor knife 2-3 dollars in change spare sun glasses spare car key business cards

stan.stuart
stan.stuart

I carry one Mobile phone with light, flat blade telephone screwdriver, one LAN tester, one Voice tone tester, 1 RJ45 coupler,2 patchleads and the essential coffee card. The drill, Tools etc stay in the car unless required.

SerrJ215
SerrJ215

I go no ware without a flashlight and my leatherman. I do draw a few laughs that I ware them on my belt everyware (even with my wedding tux) but, that plires and simple screwdriver comes in handy in just life in general. That and a small kitt with small screwdrivers, twezers and a little bottle of spare screws.

wayneleduc56
wayneleduc56

magnetic pick up toll to chase those darn screws that fall under things

mjzampana
mjzampana

#2 Phillips (long and skinny w/ magnetic tip) med size flathead star head screw driver nut driver hemostats needle nose 1 phillips & 1 flathead precision screw drivers 1" paintbrush Can of air Long Tweezers Anti static wipes penlight small magnifying glass small bull nose pliers zip ties sharpie pen & paper Copy of Spybot, AVG free, Adaware, Belarc Advisor, Enterprise OS platforms including LINUX at least a 8gig flash drive Bart boot CD as well as a couple blank CD/DVD rw Backup software Like Macrium Reflect, Ghost, or Remote Data BackUP. Razor knife Business cards Voltmeter. It's very handy to have laptop with wifi and USB cable, and some small replacement parts n your vehicle, like fans, power supplies, RAM, hard drives, an external hard drive and external CD/DVD RW, etc. All this fits into a small "lunchkit" size, soft toolbag. I bought my house with these tools...

MikeRigsby
MikeRigsby

Good plan. I'm not a field tech so my situation is a little easier to manage. I either do stuff out of my garage or at work so I don't have to drag my toolbox around from job to job. My one main piece of equipment, that I might as well turn around and go home if I forget, is my Leatherman. Also, I don't go a day without pulling out a Fluke LinkRunner and a pair of Ideal crimpers at least once. My jacket pockets at work (I work in an ESD safe environment and have to wear a labcoat) has a handfull of RJ-45s, RJ-11s, a roll of electrical tape, zip ties, a post-it note pad, a couple spare printer rollers, a wrist cord, an allen wrench set, a torx set, a PS2\USB adapter and, of all things, an RJ-45\RS232 adapter. So I guess for me it's my coat that weighs 40lbs.

krush
krush

I carrie a small pouch on my hip which contains the following: a. 1 multi-tool like a leatherman b. 1 paperclip, one end unbent c. 1 minimag flashlight d. 1 pair hemostats e. 1 pair scissors f. 1 torc screwdriver with t-4 through t10 and t-15, 2 heads per piece, 3 pieces that fit in the handle g. 1 screwdriver with 4 phillips and 4 flathead heads, 2 per piece, 3 pieces that fit in the handle h. 1 pen i. 1 d-ring with work keys and work thumbdrive total weight 3lbs

reisen55
reisen55

I found that my usage of unique tools per se diminished over time, now many client sites have the tools I need to use (either I know where their supply is or I keep a set of good stuff there). I generally carry weird little tools, and software. The BARTPE Windows XP with about 70 utilities, Winternals and a GHOST cd are universal need. I carry two 40gb 2.5 inch drives for usb attach, and occasionally for offsite storage a usb 500gb drive on periodic calls. No longer a laptop though I can bring one along. And that is rather it.

Evertech108
Evertech108

Hello everyone, I'll add my 2 cents. What do I carry in my (mini)tool box? I deal with basic wiring when need be so that's why the networking gear toward the bottom. Well I like to have the most while carrying the least so here it goes: 1 Leatherman (great tool on par with the Swiss army knife) 1 LED mini flash light 1 Ratchet screw driver with changeable bits 1 4-way screw drivers 1 Cross over cable 2 Pen 1 Notepad 1 Crimping tool 1 Network tester 1 Wire cutter @10 ft of spare cat5e cabling

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I work in two buildings at a single site. When I get a hardware call I usually expect to bring something dead back to the computer room after I'm done. I have a three-shelf cart I use to transport hardware. The second shelf has a toolbox with the following: Battery-powered screwdriver and bits (2 flat, 3 Phillips, 3 Torx) Double-headed screwdriver (very small flat on one end, very small Phillips on the other) a set of hex keys a network cable tester 2 ESD bags a roll of double sided Velcro tape (I prefer it over cable ties; easier to undo) a pair of snips to cut cable ties others used a 3' CAT-5 cable a 5' CAT-5 cable a 10' CAT-5 cable a 6-outlet surge protector strip 2 USB cables 2 power cables a SVGA cable a DVI cable a DVI-SVGA adapter a mouse a mousepad isoproply alcohol screen wipes (you'd be amazed how much good will you can establish just by cleaning someone's screen) Scissors Box cutter Felt-tip pen empty Altoids tin (to hold screws and other small parts) Altoids tin with an assortment of small screws Flashlight USB flash drive Bart-PE boot CD

unhappyuser
unhappyuser

I also learned that lesson many years ago. The job I was in covered just about all aspects of IT - software, computers, printers, cabling, etc. so I needed a little bit of everything. Most of it filled a large service kit that weighed, coincidentally, about 40 pounds. I quickly realized that I needed everything but it wasn't easy carrying it around all the time. I built two other kits, one with just a few tools and another with tools and software. It was a lot easier getting around with the smaller kits and only bringing out the "big gun" when necessary. Good post Jeff. EMD

Tink!
Tink!

so I haven't needed much more than a pocketknife, couple of screwdrivers, pliers, tweezers and a Cat5 end crimper. The crimper is my one and only specialized tool. My pocketknife is my MacGyver tool. I've always had one since I was 10. Love the kind that comes with an eyeglass screwdriver. That little tool comes in handy when installing or moving phone lines, fixing bent phone or cat5 wires, as well as removing many miniscule screws. I also make sure it has a phillips and a flathead on it. Scissors are a big plus! And currently loving the pen in my keychain pocketknife. :) A small flathead screwriver proves to be the most useful tool to me. I can use it on most phillips screws that are found in electronics and computers. As well as using it for a mini-crowbar to pry open handheld devices and peripherals. I have a fold-up tool kit that a co-worker bought for me and for the most part it has everything I need. (except for a star shaped head which I had to borrow - [i]and have since acquired from borrowing so often [/i]- from his toolkit). So that plus my pocketknives, and an occasional tool from my automotive toolbox I keep in the car, keep me well equipped for everything I encounter around here. Oh and one big essential for IT techs - a flashlight. I keep one on every keychain. Very handy for lighting shadowy areas inside the computers or peripherals and great for working in server and phone closets as well as under and behind desks. (I don't wear dresses - ever)

Da Saint
Da Saint

magnetized tip of course

pdr5407
pdr5407

I carry a small computer toolkit with 15+ tools, including multi-bit screwdriver, several sizes of pliers, tweezers, and cable cutters. A USB to IDE and SATA cable with power adapter helps to transfer files between the hard drives. Extra memory DIMMs, can of compressed air, and ethernet cables. A USB drive with software, and a few troubleshooting CDs are also essential.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Back when I did pc tech or field work, my tool bag consisted of what you mentioned or even smaller. I was fond of the quality $100+ Leatherman tools. I hated looking like a geek and carrying so many tools. But I've been a hands on, make do with whatcha got kinda guy. My dad taught me that. Thanks to his teaching, I managed to get myself out of several tight spots without too much work. Once in high school I had an old big block ford I had resored. Massive torque + stock driveline = a broken universal joint and a stranded vehicle. I knew of an auto zone 3 miles up the road so I started walking. I picked up a new uv joint and a cheap hammer and the autozone guy was kinda enough to ive me a ride to my car on his break. I managed to change the uv joint with a hammer, a broken flathead screwdriver and a piece of a 2x4 I found by the roadside. 95% of pc work can be taken care of properly with a little creativity and a toolkit like you mentioned or smaller.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

but if that's what you have in mind, why not buy it? I find a lot of these tool kits include things I never use. I rather spend a bit more and buy individual pieces. Many models of fishing tackle box make good tool boxes.

t2nm
t2nm

The Belkin kit you listed is a good choice. It's the exact kit I buy for my new techs. The basic essentials have to be a Leatherman ( I have the "Blast") that has a good wire cutter and a pair of scissors, and of course a flat and phillips screwdriver. Just this tool will handle about 70% of your needs doing basic desktop and network support. For most anything else you can make the trip back to the office and get your full tool-box.

mike.motes
mike.motes

Sometimes at the customer's site it's nice to be able to connect up your laptop for diagnostics. Many times where I was working, there wasn't an extra connection available, so I've thrown in a small unmanaged switch into one of my kits. This came in extra handy last month diagnosing a wimax problem on the customer's roof!

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Being able to toss on your jacket with all the various pockets loaded with your kit is a wonderful thing. I developed that habit wearing four season army jackets all growing up; a pocket for everything and always there when you need it.

Tink!
Tink!

my do-hickeys (aka thingamajigs) - a small and a large paperclip unbent halfway with tape wrapped around one end. These things are used when fixing printers where I need to keep the cover open to figure out the problem. A paperclip is indeed a versatile tool. So is a toothpick. I've fixed many a loose door jambs, file cabinet handles, and other miscellaneous things with a toothpick and super glue. :D

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I never leave home without mine though it's meant being turned away from the pub once or twice. It's the result of slowly upgrading from Swiss to Swiss and currently, there is not an upgrade beyond the Champ.

IC-IT
IC-IT

They can be handy for holding a jumper at the right angle in difficult spots. There are three steps to the pressure it can apply. so you can position it without having to squeeze the handle etc.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"If it moves and it shouldn't, use the duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use the WD-40."

Tink!
Tink!

I just looked up the Champ and I know what I want for Mother's Day! :D I've always been partial to Swiss Army knives. I still mourn the loss of my very first Swiss Army knife. It had a scissors and everything. I haven't been able to find an equal to it. (But this Champ one could definitely fill the hole in my heart!) I heard many years ago back when I got my first knife, that you could get in trouble if you were carrying a knife wider than your palm spread. Not sure if that's still true. But I was ever wary since I've always had a big pocketknife and a small pocketknife on my keychains on the quick release gadgets. I think back when I used to be a file clerk for a law office I used to leave them at the office since I had to walk through metal detectors at the courthouses. :(

OnTheRopes
OnTheRopes

What'd you do, make everyone laugh so hard they spilled their drinks? What'd they say? "Is that a knife in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?" :^0 Sorry but that just stretches your credibility to beyond belief, for me.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Hopefully you get paid enough you can afford not to worry about that last bit so much! I started tossing those out the window back in 10th grade. :)

JamesRL
JamesRL

The original Red Green episodes were shot in Hamilton, about 20 miles from where I grew up. The movie was shot in many areas, but much of the outdoor shots were filmed around the area where I grew up. James

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

A good gerber or leatherman has been on my list for a while. I'm not even sure why I've not added it to my backpack kit yet.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

so I went with the hook-em, then explain approach. ;)

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...and rarely go anywhere without it. And anywhere that feels it needs to turn me away because I have it is somewhere I don't need to go anyway.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I was more partial to Leatherman. I haven't needed a knife since I got out of the National Guard. Oh, and if you know a serviceman they'll surely appreciate a Swiss, Leatherman, or Gerber next time you're shopping for gifts.

Tink!
Tink!

and based on that I can get an idea of what your title is actually saying. But no matter how many times I read your title I can't make head nor tail of it! :D

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

The name really does say it all. I can live without the flashdrive and lighter included in some of the smaller models. My pocket knives used to be flat in my pocket sideways where diameter is the shortest side (blade, scale scraper, small blade; not a lot of layers there). With this one, the shortest distance became the sidewall since the diameter across the folded tools is about an inch. One word of warning.. it hurts like a moth##-F if it's in your pocket and you fall on it. I had a charley-horse bruise for a week under where it rests in my pocket. This is actually my second. The good folks replaced my first under lifetime warranty with no questions asked after a plier jaw broke and a side covering fell off. It's a brand that still justifies loyalty. :D

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

If you need to travel with a tech kit, you're condemned to checking the bag.

mmoran
mmoran

Had one of those little combination bit-holder/screwdriver thingies in my laptop case. Screener didn't take it, but cautioned me that a different one might and suggested that I put it in checked baggage on the return flight. I took the advice.

Tink!
Tink!

Was indeed used to kill a large black man in the movie [b]Stuck[/b]. :D

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I believe there are a few states where they are illegal but fine in most. The first thing I do when traveling with free time is check out the local knife shops and take a few minutes to play. They're like a yo-yo.. open, close, open differently, close differently, open differently again, close differently again, toss open, drop swing close.. I've made a few bladeless trainers to play while respecting the local laws. The look on shop owners faces when they show you a blade and you do more than just a half twist open.. that look can be priceless If it's of interest, the balisong is the national knife of the Philipines. You can find some absolutely stunning works of metal art once you move past the skeleton handle weapon looking designs and into the wood handled bowie blade shapes. (I'd happily agree to never let it leave my home if .CA's laws allowed but as it is, I'm not going to try and explain away one and risk having time away from my family imposed.)

OnTheRopes
OnTheRopes

Last I knew, Balisongs are legal in the US as long as they're not imported. Yours may not be legal for carry, concealed, outside of the house if the blade length is too long or if the blade is sharpened on both sides.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

One of my favorite watering holes installed a small one in the door jamb. You get a red light if it goes off and they mention it to you at the bar politely. Night clubs have the big old wand and just scan everyone. I tend to forget because I carry a nice pocket knife everywhere I go, usually a sizeable folder (CRKT or something nice)and then another smaller knife that is less expensive and I don't mind using it for prying....like a spyderco. But things are different where I come from. Back there you had your work knife, your nice knife for defense and on sundays you had your church knife. It was usually stainless, ivory handled or some other off the beaten path material. If it cost less than $200 you better not have the clip showing since it was a piece of trash. :) Kind of like Texas and their Bar-B-Que gun tradition. That's the only time my uncle (from Texas) will carry his Colt 1911, pearl handled .38 super and a custom handmade holster where it can actually be seen. After the BBQ he removes it in the car and goes back to carrying an officer's model concealed in another equally elaborately carved high rise, but neatly concealed rig.

Tink!
Tink!

Never heard the word "balisong" before. Turns out I have one in my headboard (shhh), for protection.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Any knife can be used or designed to look like a weapon but the original intent of the balisong was a utility knife: - opened easily with one hand - blade will not collaps when open - blade will not accidentily cut when closed But the venerable butterfly knife is instead listed as a weapon; "can be opened one handed using gravity or mechanical mechanism". Been a long while since I was into knife collecting but I remember some very nice blades. Your wholesaler friend probably has access to some gorgeous metalwork.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

It's separated from the regular club district and more importantly, in an area where it wouldn't be hard to disappear before authorities arrived. The club scene never was my thing anyhow. give me a nice quiet pool pub like down by queen/spidina anytime.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

wonderful but of closeup magic though.. I laughed. ;)

Rastor9
Rastor9

Or a pencil on a desk with a fast magic trick.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I haven't been since the 80s. James

JamesRL
JamesRL

Novel where an assasin does just that. James

JamesRL
JamesRL

....I had some friends who were rock climbers, and never went anywhere without their swiss army knives. Came in handy on more than one occasion. When I worked at a 7-11, I bought a nice 4 " folding knife from a co-worker whose spouse was a wholesaler of knives. I used it for cutting boxes and camping, but never for defense. James

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

then anything jammed in your ear probably isn't going to be a threat. (hehe.. I couldn't resist)

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Well, if the hangover I had to show for it after was any indication. ;P

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I think it was the Phoenix or whatever the dance club over by Sherbourne and Gerrard is called these days. It made sense afterward but I was stunned at first. A folding pocket knife is the last thing any farmboy would reach for as a weapon; you'd be on the ground before you got the thing half open.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

My first year in the big bad city and being a small town boy, not having my pocket knife with me was like leaving my watch and wallet at home too. So, us Uni students get to the club and I haven't even considered door searches. Regular pubs don't care but after that if it was a door search type place, everything stays at home. Who knows what horrors could be carried out with a fearsome pocket knife (actually, quite a lot once it's open so they had some basis for the rules).

thadaeus
thadaeus

A 5mm pencil will also do the trick. If you have a brain, anything can become a weapon.

Router boy
Router boy

unsharpened pencil through the ear...

Tink!
Tink!

Quite frankly, the need for security has escalated to near paranoia. There are so many ordinary objects that could easily become a weapon should the idea occur. Humans are very resourceful this way. Therefore we must simply come to the conclusion that life should continue in as normal of a fashion as possible and just continue to watch for the "real" weapons such as guns, knives and explosives. The more we try to focus on ordinary objects that have the potential for weaponry, the more they WILL BECOME weapons. (same idea as saying the economy is bad perpetuates a bad economy)

JamesRL
JamesRL

With a ballpoint pen...should we outlaw those? James

Tink!
Tink!

You can kill someone with a screwdriver to the eye. ]:)

OnTheRopes
OnTheRopes

I have seen people being scanned with a wand at nightclubs. Pubs, to me, means a little Mom and Pop shop without any screening measures in place. I've never been wanded at any bar or tavern I've ever been in so the thought didn't occur to me. I seldom leave the house without having two knives on me, neither of them a Swiss knife. I've never encountered any problems while doing that. At one point a police officer who had legally stopped me for questioning asked if I had any weapons on me and I told him yes and where they were. He removed them from me while we were talking and gave them back when we were done.

JamesRL
JamesRL

There are nightclubs in Toronto that do weapons searches. I can see why they would turn away anyone with any sort of knife on principle. I've never been to a pub that does the same, but maybe Neon and I run in different circles. I had to check my screwdriver set at an airport once - I had it in my computer bag, but they thought it was a threat. This was long before 9/11 and I had to ask why. Apparently they thought if I was deranged I could unscrew a window in flight or something. James James