Storage

Hard disk recovery ice capades

One man's experience putting an old saw of data salvage to the test: Can freezing revive a failing drive?

One of the first things I remember reading on TechRepublic was an article with 200 tips and tricks for recovering data from failing hard disks. One of the most outlandish ideas contained in that mountain of advice was the suggestion that you can sometimes resuscitate a drive that's experiencing mechanical problems by throwing it in the freezer for a while. While working the help desk, I've never had a failing drive disposable enough that I would consider using it to test that suggestion. I've always wondered whether it really worked or not, though. Well, I should be careful what I wish for in the future.

For a couple of years, I used a Seagate 5 gigabyte Pocket USB hard drive to carry files around the office. It had enough capacity that I could carry a ton of troubleshooting tools on my service calls, and it was a lot cheaper when I got it than solid-state drives of comparable size. Well, as all mechanical hard drives eventually must, my trusty companion failed a few weeks ago. The volume wouldn't mount when I connected it to several computers, and the drive started to make a slight clicking noise when under power. After making sure that the failure wasn't a software problem with the disk, I realized that I finally had a candidate for the deep freeze.

First off, the caveats:

  • The only foolproof way to protect your data from hard drive failure is through regular backups. Make ‘em, and make ‘em often.
  • I only undertook this with a drive that contained files I could live without or that I already had backed up. If you absolutely need data recovered, don't risk your only copy. Contact a data recovery professional.

There we go. My conscience is clear.

The general consensus on the Web (as far as that goes) seems to be that freezing a drive can help by causing the metal parts in the drive contract slightly. This just might help unstick read-write heads from the drive platters, or cause physical scars to the platters or bearings to shrink just enough to return them to operating tolerances.

There's less of a consensus on how to go about the actual process of freezing your drive. How long, how cold...details like these vary based on anecdote. Some folks advise using a long cable to run your drive from the freezer once it's at temperature. So, I tried to use common sense to come up with my own process.

  • Step 1: I protected the drive. I used a freezer bag to hold the drive, and packed the hardware in a paper towel with a desiccant pack to keep moisture under control. I want the drive cold, not encased in ice. Before zipping the bag shut, I sucked out as much air as I could.
  • Step 2: I put the freezer bag with my drive in it into the freezer.
  • Step 3: I waited.

Now, if the explanation for why this should work is credible, it would seem that you'd have to cool it for quite a while. Hey, I'm not a materials physicist, but if you're hoping that metal parts will contract, then I'd say that you should keep the drive on ice for a minimum of 24 hours, maybe longer. That's what I decided to do for my first, dubiously scientific trial.

After my wait, it was the moment of truth. I pulled the pack out of my freezer, and hooked it up to my Mac at home.

And lo and behold, it worked. Sort of.

Previous efforts with Windows and Mac OS drive utilities had failed to get either operating system to mount the drive, despite the fact that the drive's USB bridge would appear in the device manager. After it was chilled, my Mac detected the drive and asked if I wanted to format the volume. The drive didn't hold out long enough to allow me to see if I could recover anything from the logical volume, though. After only a second or two, the drive started clicking again and wouldn't respond. In the couple of attempts to re-freeze the drive I've made since, the hardware wouldn't respond it all, even though it's still getting power through the interface.

So what's my verdict on the old wives' tale? It may work. I'll buy that there might be a case where a change in temperature would "unstick" a drive mechanism that's not functioning right. But giving it a good smack might be just as effective.

I haven't given up, though. This is interesting to fool around with during my downtime. For the last two weeks, I've had my drive sitting in cold storage. I'm going to see if dramatically extending the freezer time has more of an effect. Next, maybe I'll try heating it with the hair dryer. I forget what number that was in the list of 200.

Note: Due to a long-ago platform change, the original article/download is no longer available on TechRepublic's Web site, but Archive.org has a copy here.
60 comments
mikemrclean
mikemrclean

No old wives tail. The article points out unsticking the read/write heads but more accurately it is the bearings that are freed, when it works. Back a long..no long long time ago we would take a 5 meg, 5 platter "tug boat" drive, set it on the floor, and kick it hard like spinning the bottle to break it loose. 60-70% sucess rate on a drive with "stickshun".

mikeconcar
mikeconcar

I always try this, at least as a last resort, and I have had more success than failure. I am totally open to using this method on any drive that I've declared as officially "unreadable". The freezer should be the final stop before the disposal bin. Edit: I usually put the drive in a sealed plastic bag for a minimum of 1 hour. That seems to be long enough. And remember: The next spin of that drive could be its last! Have your backup procedures ready to go as soon as you plug it in!

kehoffman
kehoffman

Our service department often uses this method. If the drive is having mechanical problems, you have a 50/50 chance of getting your data. If there is a software problem, it will do little to no good. We frequently leave the drive in the freezer overnight. I suspect the drive Joe was trying this on did not have enought mass and heated up too quickly. In this case, using it while it was still in the freezer might have worked better. Keith Hoffman

gillistg
gillistg

Over the past 10 or so years I have used the freeze option many times and almost always with complete success - a couple of times with only partial success. I don't know why I tried it but the idea just came to me - I had never heard or read anything about it until I came across this article today. I have been able to recover data and transfer to good drives on hardrives from Seagate, Quantum, Maxtor on Solaris, windows 3x, win NT etc. A majority of the recoveries were SCSI drives on Solaris. TGG Halifax

rickydoo
rickydoo

It's worked 2 out of 2 times for me over the last few years, and I've had a 3rd in the freezer for a week (not critical, so it slipped my mind) but I can see some drives being too far gone to make a difference. One drive had to be re-frozen 3 times, copying a little more data each time until it was done, and it lasted almost no time at all the last attempt. If it's a USB drive, and it's in a casing, it may well be that the insulation of the case is warming the drive up too fast to get into before it locks up again.

Leonard J Rivera Sr.
Leonard J Rivera Sr.

I have several internal IDE drive that have failed. Apparently something in the on board IDE technology went because they work perfectly fine when plugged them in to an IDE to USB2.0 cable kit. Even and external USB2.0 housing will work. It's worth a shot prior to freezing or junking.

willchildress
willchildress

if uv ever had an issue with your hard drive than you know how frustrating it can be to recover your data. There are programs that are pretty good at data recovery. My favorite FinalData Pro. I have only had one incident where the information couldn't be recovered.

nick
nick

I used to manage a data centre with over 30 rather old servers and associated drive arrays. For various reasons we semi regularly had to shut down all equipment. When starting up again invariably one or more disks would fail to spin up. The normal solution was to extract the faulty disk and hold it in the hand and rapidly twist the drive along the axis of rotation of the platters. Reinsert the disk and power up again. This fixed the drives the majority of the time. The theory was that the platters were stuck in one position and the twisting nudged them slightly to a new position and thus free up the mechanism enough for the motor to spin them up. This did not work for head crashes or other mechanical failures.

cdeanusa
cdeanusa

I have been a tech and Instructor for Idaho State University for 9 years. I have tried freezing 9 times and it worked 7 1/2 times one of the drives ran up but failed again irrecoverably before I got all the data from it.

golferguy1
golferguy1

I have always used SyncBack, an exc. freeware, that I set for a regular behind-the-scenes synchronize to another hdrv. EXC.product.

dennismcqueen
dennismcqueen

I have used this in the past very successfully. First in the Navy then in my civilian life. I have quit attempting this tho in recent times. It is my belief that earlier harddrives were 1) bigger physically, 2) more metal in construction. The newer drives are smaller and therefore have less substance to hold and maintain lower temperatures so they warm and expand faster than one can really work to recover data, and having disassembled several out of cureosity I have seen that there are many more parts made from nonmetalic materials, resulting in a major difference in the expansion/contraction factors.

rudy.berongoy
rudy.berongoy

In my experience, I have always found this to work, OK 95.99% of the time it has in the past....But make sure you make regular backups to avoid having to do this. I tend to but it in an antistatic bag and keep the HDD in the freezer compartment for over 24 hours or longer, I've found that the longer you keep it in deep freeze the better the results. I was skeptical at first when i heard about this work aground, but I was pleasantly surprised when it did work. It's got us out of a few scrapes in the past. Give it a go, what have you got to lose at the end of the day?

blarman
blarman

I used to build hard drives for a major hard drive manufacturer. The drives were tested in environmentally controlled chambers called "burn-in" chambers which would alternate between freezing and frying temperatures - cycling through from extreme to extreme about every 6 hours (I can't cite exact temperatures). Each drive would go through extensive testing during this time to check for defects and failure. Keep in mind however, that the drives have an optimal operating temperature range. This optimal range is a result of the expansion rates of the various metals/materials and the _extremely_ fine tolerances of the parts. Hard drives are arguably the most complex electromechanical devices known to man, so even minor variances can cause performance to fall outside of accepted parameters and lead to disaster (head crash). I only advocate freezing as a last-ditch method for data recovery efforts, and should include the expectation that the drive will not function properly for extended life afterwards. Get the data off and toss the drive. Definitely do NOT attempt to operate the drive for extensive periods of time outside the standard operating parameters.

Sportz
Sportz

Oh My Gosh! This brings back memories...If anyone has already posted the history, I apologize now. The original reason for freezing a drive dates back to the early-to-mid nineties, when Sony manufactured a 20 MB (Yes, Megabyte) drive that had a habit of seizing up as the drive warmed up. I saw a lot of those in the Mac Plus. So much so, that Apple was offering a free RMA to all owners of Macintosh computers with a Sony 20 MB drive. The reason for seizen was the OEM for the spindle bearing used a lubricant that would congeal as the drive heated up. Putting the drive in a plastic bag and into the freezer for about 30 minutes was enough to soften the grease long enough to recover the data, and replace the drive. Sometime a good whack on the side of the drive with the handle of a screwdriver was enough to get it going. Remember Micropolis? That very bearing grease issue was a contributing factor of their demise in the mid nineties. More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micropolis_Corporation

luigi.digrande
luigi.digrande

Back in 2001/2002, I had a Latitude C600 shipment, 40 systems, from Dell in which the systems contained a bad batch of Fujitsu 40GB HDDs. Within 3 months all HDDs failed. They made the dreaded clicking noise. I was able to recover the data by freezing the hard drives for 15-20 minutes and then doing a disk to disk ghost image. Worked like a charm. I haven't run into a situation like this again.

FreeMyIT
FreeMyIT

Been freezing failed drives for years and it worked for me 90% of the time. I only froze it for 4 hours and transfered as much as a could to a second working drive.

megloops
megloops

Yes I tried and it worked - a little at a time. Had to refreeze. Only got some basic "really need-it" before the freezing stopped working

Axial
Axial

I've resuscitated drives that wouldn't spin up by lightly warming up the bottom's center "spindle" area with a hair blower, my variation on the eons-old tale about heating drives in toaster ovens, which always struck me as slightly risky.

Joe_R
Joe_R

I remember that article. And yes, I did try freezing a bad drive - a couple of times, actually. Never worked. All it got me was a few laughs from people who saw the drive in the freezer - and not too many people understood my "cold cache" joke!

www.solutions.prnewell.com
www.solutions.prnewell.com

I have done that and it worked. I've also opend up a hard drive (laptop no less) and assisted the motor to spin up the platter by starting it spinning with my finger. This also worked. I copied gigabytes of data and the drive was till working a half hour later.

TechieRob
TechieRob

Then keeping it cool is the second. I have had a lot of success using this method, but the key to a more successful recovery is keeping the drive cool whilst recovering the data. A lot of hard drives that have reached this stage will fail when heated to normal operating temperature (or 'overheated'). I have found that keeping the drives as cool as possible during operation significantly increases the chance of data recovery Where I used to work, I used an icebrick and a paper towel and a handful of high powered case fans to keep a hard drive cool whilst operating. This method lasted an hour before the drive started clicking again. This was sufficient time to restore the data a client needed The boss thought I was mad, however - which I'm used to. :D

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Packed a laptop hard drive in between two massive desiccant packs (4" x 6"), stuffed the sandwich in a Zip-lok bag, sucked out the air, and shoved it in the freezer for the weekend. Came in Monday, put the drive back in the system, booted off a Bart-PE CD and successfully extracted the data. Ran KillDisk and sent the drive out to our machine shop; the guys out there have a great time coming up with new ways to physically destroy a drive.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Blue screens are really cool too!I would say that every drive ever returned to Maxtor had a virus in the firmware.But what's a few million dollars to Maxtor?

wildcatsystems
wildcatsystems

The one time we put the big freeze on a drive was because it was getting REALLY HOT and that chilled it so we could get the data off the drive.

mjd420nova
mjd420nova

I've been successful at a number of what might seem unorthodox methods to revive hard drives long enough to extract valuable data. Freezing is one, heating in an oven another(175 degrees). Manually holding a drive in the hand and rotating while applying power another to get a disk to spin works too. Knowing the inner workings can be help full in getting a stuck head into the rest position so it will start or read the clock track by bumping it slightly does wonders too. Short of replacing a drive mechanism circuit board, I've even worked in a clean room to extract platters and place them in known good drives to get badly needed data is a last resort and some outfits charge big bucks to do those types of recovery but if you have access to the clean room you could do it yourself. It helps if you take apart the donor drive first so you can become acquainted with what's needed before tackling the critical drive.

DanLM
DanLM

That was basicatly what happened when I tried to restore a hard drive that way... Froze it over night, plugged it in... And dang, it started to work... Didn't last long enough for me to sit down to start copying files though.. So, alas... I lost all my ebooks... Lesson learned, backup more often. Dan

stullmeister
stullmeister

I've frozen some drives to get them to work again.. Had a mix of success, as I've had quite a few work long enough to get the data off that I needed. I didn't keep it in 24 hours.. at most, maybe 30-45 minutes. An ex-boss a few years ago showed me the freezer trick. At first I thought he'd lost his mind, but when it worked, it became something I now try myself if I think it may bring a drive back to life.

williamjones
williamjones

Have you ever resorted to putting a drive on ice to try and revive it? What about my methodology? Do you see any flaws with my attempt? Certainly, this hasn't been a truly scientific experiment. First off, my data set of "one" is a little small. Please, though, don't take that as an invitation to put your hosed drives in the mail. What are some other bits of data recovery voodoo that have worked for you?

williamjones
williamjones

You're right, my 1 inch Seagate drive is pretty small. I had initially thought that the cold might have a more profound effect on it's smaller components. But, less mass means that the drive will heat up more quickly, too. I did try running the drive in the freezer (not too hard since it's bus powered), but that result in any change. As others have mentioned, I think that multiple freezing cycles produce diminishing returns. Thanks for your comment, Keith.

Tech_Monkey
Tech_Monkey

freezer trick has worked for me and some others i know afew times, but usually not successful when the drive is clicking or clanking. i think the key is to keep drive cold after removing from freezer, gives you that few extra minutes to retrieve files. every minute counts, and each minute is most likely the drives last.

williamjones
williamjones

I haven't ever heard any comments on this piece of lore from someone with experience manufacturing drives before. Thanks for chiming in!

vtassone
vtassone

Call the local police dept. and tell them that you were working on a customers pc. You saw child porn on it just before the hard drive failed. The only part I havn't figured out is how to get the data back from them after they do the forensics ;-)

orvinabbott
orvinabbott

I've also tried the freezer trick and think that once things start heating up then it doesn't last long. My daughter had a drive that the electronics were overheating. I used an icepack to rest the drive on to cool the circuit board. I was able to recover over 60GB of pictures for my daughter, who is a professional photographer. She was quite pleased with the success.

wgs
wgs

About a year ago, I had a SCSI 10,000 RPM drive fail on a SGI 8 CPU Origin 2100 with what sounded like bad bearings on the drive. I could not access the drive at all. I put the drive in the freezer for 2 days and I was able to run the drive for 10-15 minutes to recover some data. Through repeated freezing cycles and using blue freezer packs, I was eventually able to recover close to 100% of my 65 GB of data.

sparker
sparker

Boy I hate to use that term "The old days", but I started in IT in 1976, and it was the old days. We used to put whole circuit boards into the freezer, back before freeze spray, to isolate bad IC's. It also helped fix IC creep, where socketed chips would "work themselves" out of the socket. As for drives, who doesn't remember giving those old Seagate ST225 drives a whack on the side to get them started? Hmmmm, never put them in the freezer though. Maybe I should rummage through my closet, there must be one back there somewhere...

mishkinj
mishkinj

I had limited success with freezing a HDD. I froze my HDD for 24 hours. Upon connection, I was able to copy a few files from the slaved drive to the PC's main HDD (maybe 20 or so files totaling less than a few MB). The drive then started to click and stopped responding. I suspect that the drive defrosted fairly quickly because of the heat generated from the spinning. If I had enough of a desire, my next step would have been to setup the PC right next to the freezer and hookup the drive with longer IDE and power connections so that I could keep the HDD in the freezer while attempting to access it. :-D I hope to never need to attempt such a feat.

it
it

I had a HD that was failing due to heat. The computer had recently became victim to a lightning storm. After about 60-90 seconds the computer would just shut down. I removed the HD and noticed excessive heat. I wrapped two seperate "blue" ice packs in paper towels, placed them on top and bottom of the HD, and was able to retrieve the needed data using a HD USB adapter.

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

I have used this method successfully in the past, several times. The idea is to get it working long enough to Ghost the drive. I would wrap and seal the drive in an antistatic bag, leave it in the freezer for about 4 hours, then install it in a PC as quickly as possible, booting up with a diskette to try and save an image of the drive before it fails again.

tel196.au
tel196.au

I have used this method on a few drives, the only one it did not work on was the most critical, a drive from our mail server.(which only got backed up weekly) Which was later sent to a data recovery centre who only managed to get half the data off the drive which was of little use to us. we had that backed up. I have used it on a couple of desktop machines they have lasted an hour or so, enough time to get the users to transfer data off onto the server, after a day of it sitting in the freezer the users never save anything to their local PCs again.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

That stop working when the drive gets hot. So to that end on the 1 occasion when I have frozen a Drive it did work so I could recover the Data off it. But there was a problem as once the Drive starts to heat up Data Recovery goes south and becomes impossible. As this particular drive did work and the Data was Important and needed Immediately I just walked outside and grabbed some Dry Ice and threw over the drive. I waited a couple of minutes than powered up an IDE Drive and recovered the Data. While the drive did stay cold the Dry Ice was disappearing at an alarming rate toward the end of the 30 or so minutes that it took to recover the Data. Not my first idea but in this case it was the only alternative and it did teach the User to Backup often. :D Col

tlccomputers
tlccomputers

I had much success some years ago after hearing about the freeze option, but it was with much smaller drives than you see on the market today. I was able to recover all data from a 6GB drive a few years back using this method. But more recently, I used the freeze trick to attempt recovery from an 80GB drive and the system would not recognize the drive in BIOS. It makes me wonder if this trick is not as effective on the much larger capacity drives available today.

HeavyChevy71
HeavyChevy71

After I first read the article about 10 years ago, I had an occasion to give it a try on a co-workers' desktop drive. I put it into the company freezer for about 2 days and I was able to recover everything. Since this was a vice president's desktop, I was a hero. I think it led to my promotion but I can't say. Thanks TechRepublic. Since then, I have used this method as a last ditch effort to recover data from drives where the customer doesn't want to spend over $1000 for professional recovery process. Freeze the drive for 24 hours or more then sandwich it in between 2 frozen gel packs when connecting it to the PC for recovery. It will give you extra time before it warms up again.

1dennis3
1dennis3

I tried this after I had read it and it worked long enough for me to get the files I needs off of it before it died again. This was a regular IDE hard drive. I froze it for about 24 hours in a freezer wrapped well to keep moisture out. When I took it out and connected in a PC as a slave drive and it ran for several minutes while I copied the files the user needed and soon died again. Its not a fix but a very brief bandaid that can help.

Penguin_me
Penguin_me

I've noticed a common theme in the replies - freeze it, and then keep it cool. Just wondering if anyone's tried freezing a drive and then sticking it in a cool bag with a couple of ice packs and running it from there ? Anyone tried it ? If so, what were the results ? Better, worse or no difference ? Next time I have a drive fail I'll give it a shot.

andypiesse
andypiesse

I had a SCSI drive which started to be unreliable. After a few minutes of use (ie enough time to boot the OpSys)it would become unreadable.I removed it from the server sat it on top of the system with a 4 inch fan directly on it. This cooled it enough for me to retrieve all the data. I continued to use it like this out of interest to see how long it would continue to work. Surprisingly it lasted months .

eric
eric

I've had quite a lot of experience with the freezing method and I would say I have about a 50% success rate. Most of the drives I've tried this method on were 2.5" notebook drives (overwhelmingly Hitachi drives from Toshiba notebooks). I think the longer you freeze them, the longer the drive will stay up while recovering data as once power is applied they tend to heat up quick which effectively kills the data recovery. This method has definitely been incorporated into my mental toolbox!

robo_dev
robo_dev

When at room temperature, the PC bios would recognize the drive, but the drive would not initialize. This was a Maxtor 40gig drive, btw. A co-worker asked me to try to get his data off the drive. I put the drive in a big ziplock and froze it for about eight hours. I put the drive back into the computer (as a secondary drive) and presto!, the drive initialized and I was able to copy a couple of files from it. It was making some nasty noises, which got worse and worse until the PC no longer recognized the disk. I then re-froze it overnight and was able to recover a couple more files. I wrapped it in those blue flexible freezer icepacks (and kept it mostly in the bag to reduce condensation. It did the same thing where it was making some bad noises and then stopped working altogether in less than a minute. I re-froze it a third time, but it would not initialize at all. In all I only recovered about 30 files (photos that had not been backed up).

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

I put the HD in the freezer overnight. Only tried it once though. If the drive is spinning there is mixed success installing it on a working system as a "slave" drive. Your precautionaries are the only sure way to protect your data. There's no substitute for a good backup.

b_sabharwal
b_sabharwal

I had recovered my data twice from the failed disks using Knoppix. Both of these drives were not recognized by any Windows versions or DOS for that matter. I poped the Knoppix CD and booted my machine, mounted the drive as a readonly volume and was able to copy about 90-95% of the data from the drive. I'll try to freez these and see if that works. I did try the smack idea on the drive and that did not work either ( :-D)

Leee
Leee

A former employer, the late photographer Will Counts, taught me about the use of "nose grease" to fill in gaps in photographic negatives. Simply rub the side of your nose and rub the sebum onto the film. Voila! Scratches disappear. I've used this method to fill in scratches in discs as well; I figure it's similar to your suggestion of freezing media in order to close gaps -- by expanding the overall surface -- only more long lasting and, some would argue, less hygenic.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Though the provided explanation is complete rubbish the Drive may actually work encased in a Block of Ice. Though it wouldn't be my first option. :D However I wonder how something like this would go encased in a Block of Acrylic. Sure look interesting if nothing else. :^0 I'll have to give it a go as it would be a Conversation Started if nothing else. One Doctor that I know has a Packet of Viagra encased in a block of Clear Acrylic with the following message engraved in the surface of the Acrylic. [b]In Case of Emergency Break Glass To Access Tablets. [/b] Col

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

For a desktop, server, or other system with some space in it, you could put a small "Blue Ice" pack directly on the drive while it's in the system. Be sure to wrap the bag in a thin piece of fabric to absorb any condensation and change or rotate the fabric frequently. We did this in the Army occasionally during desert exercises.

robo_dev
robo_dev

For when you throw away the freezer!

wjacomb
wjacomb

When I was first heard of this trick I too was incredulous however, over the last 4 years i have tried to recover 5 drives of various sizes and it worked for 4. The key elements are:- 1. Use a tupperware or similar freezer proof / air tight container. 2. Freeze for 48 hours - I have tried less but it doesn't seem to work. 3. Before removing from fridge prepare your workstation i.e. make sure you have sufficient storage capacity and hard drive case for the defective drive - time is of the essence you will only have about an hour for recovery. 4. Before removing from freezer have already worked out the priority for the files that you wish to recover you may not be able to recover everything before the drive fails so go for the most important files first. 5. When everything is ready, remove the drive from the freezer and work as fast as you can.

dhparr
dhparr

Sometimes the drive failure is not mechanical, but do to an overheating bad component on the circuit board. Freezing can keep that component cool enough to recover some files before it overheats again. And actually keeping the drive in the freezer (kind of awkward, but doable) can keep it cool for a full recovery. Another option is to replace the circuit board with an identical one off matching hard drive. Version numbers here can be critical to success.

Thmiuatga
Thmiuatga

Knoppix? Well, I'll give that a shot just as soon as I finish the install of Mandriva on my Linux box which will be dual-booting with Debian based 64 Studio 2.0. In the meantime I've been using a program called Zero Assumption and it's very effective. the only drawback is that it doesn't recognize raw data on the drive,only the folders so you must have your data contained within a folder, plus in the limited function mode you can only recover a total of 4 folders of data at a time. Full function is accessed only if you purchase a license from the website.

it
it

I use to use it to quickly dispose of foam at the top of my beer.

RPip
RPip

Lee, my grandfather taught me to use the same nose grease to lubricate the metal ends of a two-piece fishing rod. It keeps the pieces from sticking together after a day of surf fishing, without having to carry WD-40 or some such lubricant around. Thanks for the great memory!

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

That is just, um...gross. You keep your sebum to yourself from now on!

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