Disaster Recovery

Road warriors need mobile backups

Frequent travel is no excuse for risking data loss. Here is how your users can keep their files safe when they are away from the office.

Frequent travel is no excuse for risking data loss. Here is how your users can keep their files safe when they are away from the office.

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I have one client who's been giving me the runaround. I shouldn't say that exactly. He's very pleasant, and he's not trying to aggravate me, but we have literally the same conversation every 5 to 7 days.

This user, Tom, always contacts me to let me know that he's still having problems with his computer. His system has been troubling him with intermittent shutdowns for a while now—on the order of weeks. I tell Tom what I told him the last time that we talked, that the cursory look I had at his machine didn't tell me very much, and that he needs to leave the computer with me for further diagnostics and possible hardware service. "But this is my primary work machine!" Tom replies. Tom travels a lot, and his laptop goes everywhere with him. I then propose that I could loan him a machine, and he could work from his backup. To which Tom responds, "I don't have a backup." This starts us on our usual merry-go-round. I try to convince Tom that if his data is important enough that he can't be separated from it, it's important enough to back up. Tom retorts that he's never in on place long enough to make a back up. Thus we each dig into our positions and steel ourselves for our next inevitable confrontation.

The importance of backups just isn't clicking for Tom, and I want to figure out how to get him over that. Part of his lassitude comes from the fact that I don't think he's ever suffered an extinction-level event; he's never lost any data before, and thus the idea is only an abstraction for him. He's also kind of a one-man operation. He only comes by when he swings through town, so he's not integrated into any other computing infrastructure. His professional life really does all exist in his carry-on bag. So, I've started thinking about how Tom's backup can travel with him.

Online backup services are an option we're going to discuss. Tom is never far from a network connection, either Wifi or Cellular data. Even if there are instances where his Internet access slows down, he should be able to upload his recent changes to the cloud. If Tom worked with really large files this solution might be less workable, but Tom uses mostly Office documents. We'll make sure to do Tom's first big upload of data when he's visiting and can use our broadband Internet connection.

Mostly though, I'm going to convince Tom that he needs to start carrying a bus-powered external hard drive when he travels. Manufacturers like LaCie and Iomega are making very svelte and durable little drives that are scarcely larger than a paperback, but can hold up to 500 gigabytes of data. Since these drives can draw their power from the included USB cables, there's no annoying wall transformer or AC adapter cord that has to take up room in Tom's luggage. I'm going to propose splitting his drive into two partitions: one will have a bootable clone of his operating system and applications, so he can quickly get up and running with his stuff on another machine, should it become necessary. The remaining available space will be formatted as the destination for regular backups of the user data stored on his computer's internal drive.

Some users may be so mobile that they don't have a desk, let alone an office. These individuals value every minute saved and every ounce shaved. It's our responsibility as their support to help them realize when this behavior puts them at risk. Tom's written off backups in the past because he doesn't think centralized systems can support a user like him. Coming up with these alternate strategies, I'm confident that I can help Tom find a backup solution that's as mobile as he is.

8 comments
genethomas
genethomas

Tell Tom, when he accesses the internet on he road all he has to do is spend a few extra minutes and BU to www.carbonite.com Is stable and much better that webroot's or MOZY. Carbonite's BU is siple and direct and reliable. BU on line is just so quick and easy!!

WanderMouse
WanderMouse

I'm on the road about 50% of the time, away for 1-3 weeks when I'm gone. At home, I back up automatically to an external HD nightly. On the road, I carry a 64GB flash drive. I back up my Quicken files, docs, and other data files, which I keep on a separate D: partition on my HD, to the flash drive, each time I use them, as soon as I close them. It only takes an extra 10 seconds or so. I also use Acronis True Image to back up all my OS and program files on the C: drive to the flash drive, each time I make a major change, such as adding a new program, after a Patch Tues. update, etc. That way, if my HD crashes on the road, I can have a replacement express-shipped in 24-36 hours, and restore all files when I get it. (I use Acronis to back up to DVD-R disks at home.) Without carrying a lot of unnecessary programs & files, this backup uses 2/3 or less of the 64GB available. The small form factor and greater durability of flash memory beats a portable external HD any day of the week, in my book- unless your backup files are too large to fit within 64 GB, even with maximum compression.

santeewelding
santeewelding

The whole of it came down to just one word you used. "Lassitude". How far, how wide, how deep did you have to dig for that one?

moktarino
moktarino

If you're having this conversation with your users, it's time to buck up and lay down the law. At my workplace, if a user's data gets lost it's MY fault (whether it really is or not). Therefore I am going to do everything necessary to make sure *I* don't get stuck holding the blamestick when that time inevitably rolls around. This comes down to understanding that you CANNOT TRUST USERS TO MANAGE THEIR OWN DATA. There, I said it. Even if they can, even if they used to be sysadmins and are now sales, it doesn't matter. Take control, that's why you have it. If you don't have control of your user's data, someone else will (after your position is vacated).

williamjones
williamjones

In my post for this week, I discuss how I'm going to help one of my frequent travelers keep his data safe. What solutions have you found to the data security challenges that mobile users present?

williamjones
williamjones

It fell off the pile when I was cleaning my desk to get to the keyboard.

TNT
TNT

I sync my phones document directory with my laptop so I have the same data on both devices. Probably not a good solution if you have a large mobile user base, but for the small office it should work well.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

A company called NetMotion makes a persistent VPN connection designed for mobile users. I've seen it in use and it is quite impressive. It makes enforcing policies and keeping laptops up to date much easier. They call it a "mobile VPN solution." The security, encryption and the ability to craft custom policies are impressive. You should at least take a look. If it is for a mobile workstation that stays connected constantly, it is great. The user will not be able to log on wirelessly without having his traffic sent back through your network, that way you can enforce all the same policies you do at the office. The connection is all also persistent, so if you have an app that requires constant connection, the software "fools" the app into thinking you are connected, even if you are intermittently connected.

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