Mobility

Smartphones: Do you use one or support them? Take the poll and share your experience

With the recent popularity of Smartphones, they're bound to make their way into user support functions, either by having to support them or actually using them. Take the poll and share your experiences.

With the recent popularity of Smartphones, they're bound to make their way into user support functions, either by having to support them or actually using them. Take the poll and share your experiences.

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Smartphone defined: Painting the definition with a broad brush, I'll call it a mobile phone (a cell phone) with advanced computer-like functionality.

Okay, I'll admit it. I don't have a Smartphone. I still have one of the antiquated flip-phones. When I bought it a few years ago, I thought it was pretty advanced because it had a built-in camera. But mine pales in comparison to the features and functionality of a new Smartphone.

My son, on the other hand, has one of the new iPhones from Apple -- and he often reminds me how great it is. (But he only has it thanks to me. It was a recent Christmas gift.) He's often proved how cool it is by using it for any number of reasons, usually in response to a question I might throw out there.

We were recently driving down the street and were passed by a classic Camaro, and I guessed out loud that it was a 1968 or 1969 and probably had the 427 C.I. engine since it was one of the limited-edition Yenko SC models. Within about 15 seconds, using his iPhone, he found a Web page that told all about it. He read the specs and the history behind the Yenko Camaro while we were pacing one driving down the road (it was a 1969). While we've been out together, he's used it to look up phone numbers, get maps and directions, and find prices and availability for any number of products from various retail outlets.

I was absolutely amazed when he used (what I later learned was) the Shazam feature, when he plugged in a microphone, put it up to the radio speaker in the car, and within mere seconds, it captured and recognized the song that was playing, having displayed detailed information about it, including the artist, song, and album.

Of course, sending and receiving e-mail from his iPhone is old hat. Actually, I don't think he even uses his PC for that anymore.

I would imagine, especially for user support professionals on the go, these could be of enormous benefit. But regardless of the professional and business applications, I've just got to get one of these things. They are just too cool. I'm just not sure which one.

I wonder where I am compared to my TR peers. Am I one of the few who don't have one, or are there more like me out there?

And please share in the following discussion which Smartphone you have, which one you believe is the best, and why? And what business functions have you used yours for?

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62 comments
jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Good messaging is nothing but problems, how is that crap still around? With that being said, Windows Mobile is meh compared to Android and the iPhone. I do like RSS and I really like the extended battery in my Q, but honestly Windows Mobile makes things harder than they need to be.

CEHATX1
CEHATX1

loving everything about this phone so far

sgarrison
sgarrison

I have a bb bold and it is great. you can connect to wifi's or regular cell phone towers. it is more robust than the curve and will last you longer plus downloading web content faster.

debbiem
debbiem

I love my Blackjack II, I help with user support on pop3 email set ups and we are about to launch IMAP for additional service features. But all in all it seems to me that the experience with phones is a very personal things - some serious techno-NOTS are great with more complex phones but when it comes to actual computers - they should not be allowed near a keyboard. iPhone users LOVE the phones but the need to restart when things go wrong reminds me of the early (in the 80's) mac days when if you did not have to reboot once an hour you were not working hard enough. I have long since built a respect for both macs and pcs and now laugh as I watch a similar phone snobbery take over where the mac vs pc wars began. In my work I find most users do not know all that their device is capable of - no matter which device it is, because (IMHO) for the most part people are reluctant to read the manual.

dennis.jacobsen
dennis.jacobsen

I have a company BB 8820, support BB 8310's, BB 8900 and BB 8280's. User related issues, anything above that is referred to the corporate BB desk.

northga
northga

I use a BB Curve, for realtors the Smartphone is a necessity.

mike.tucker
mike.tucker

However; what's funny is our company will not purchase Macs....

ThreeLittleBirds
ThreeLittleBirds

I still use a PDA (Palm OS) for all of my calendaring, phone lists, mini databases, etc. I have a phone that is probably a smartphone by use but not by the vendors' standard (Samsung Delve R800). In my workplace the Blackberry is the standard and I chose not to receive one. I am amazed at the number of times my peers have to go to I.T. for firmware updates, repairs, replacements (for new models), etc. My biggest aggravation is the fact that all of my functionality is in one device. If the device goes, everything goes. Too often, I have coworkers who lose the phone function on their Blackberry and usually one or more of the apps also stops working. As a personal note, in the corporate environment, I see the use of smartphones as an electronic leash. I don't need the ability to stay THAT in touch with my office or email, especially 24/7!

cseager
cseager

I started with a Palm 700wx and am now using a Samsung SCH-i770. I needed the windows OS for the applications that I run. I support Blackberry's (World Edition and Curve) throughout our environment. My users can't imagine life without them.

jpdecesare
jpdecesare

I've tried 'em all... Palm, Windows Mobile, fought with a Blackberry, you can have 'em. I've wasted time fighting with them all, and they all look/smell/feel the same. The iPhone is so superior it shouldn't even be in the same class. As usual, Apple once again builds the best UI. You can FLY on that onscreen keyboard, way faster than the buttons of Blackberry/Moto Q/Whatever. And now that the 3.0 software has been announced with all it can do (Cut/Copy/Paste, tethering, push for IM apps even not running, full MMS support, complete phone search), there's no more competition. And if there's something you need to do and think the iPhone doesn't have it, have a go at the 25,000 apps in the iTunes Store. You'll find it!

nhahajn
nhahajn

Uses Windows Mobile 6.0 We have some users already upgraded to the newer Fuze. I like them both except for battery life, which sucks. Easy to integrate with Exchange.

r_a_smith3530
r_a_smith3530

I've set this phone up with a modified Bootloader, Radio package and a cooked ROM. It now runs WinMo 6.1, so I have GPS functionality and EV-DO Rev A. I use the phone to respond to trouble calls, for directions while on the road, and as a way to get information off the web when there is no other form of connectivity. Out on the road, all I really need are my smartphone, my netbook, an external USB hard drive, a couple USB sticks, and my hand tools.

scankirili
scankirili

I have a HTC. I love it. Only problem is battery. I hope technology gets better for battery froblems.

sidekick
sidekick

OK, the smartphones aren't dangerous in themselves, but put into the wrong hands... My brother-in-law uses his Crackberry for work regularly (lawyer), as well as checking on his fantasy football while driving down the road. At least we were able to teach his kids to give him crap about it.

AndrewB_NZ
AndrewB_NZ

Has it's quirks - but I like it a lot :)

cupcake
cupcake

Okay, so everyone here probably knows by now that I am an Apple supporter from wayyyy back... (1984 to be exact) and one of those people who wears the "I'll buy anything if its shiny and made by Apple" t-shirt. But I carried around an old Nokia phone for like 8 or 9 years before I was finally convinced that I need more than a "phone" to carry around with me. And now I cannot understand how I would live without it! I especially like the support and community that stands behind the iPhone. As soon as the kid gets a B average on his report card, he gets my first gen iPhone and I will get the 3G version. I wish my company gave us these to use as company phones!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

What bugs me is people that have a phone, hold it in their hand, checking at the screen every 3 mins and they DON'T ANSWER IT when it rings. Send them a text and its clickity click to get you a reply right away. People, you are holding a telephone, its faster and much better than typing an abbreviated message that can't quickly answer questions the recipient has, without them in turn typing some ilttle message to you and waiting for reply! Email is one thing, but text is completely mental. Unless the person is not available, why not use it as a telephone? Even if they can't answer, doesn't everyone have voice mail? Text has no real purpose other than to hide a conversation. I simply don't see the logic behind holding a live link to quick voice conversation in your hand and then using it to tap out text on a little keypad instead of talking on it and saving 30 mins and 10 messages with one 2 minute conversation. It's a PHONE, since when was the phone replaced by the typewriter?

donnaw
donnaw

At my company we have been testing iPhones to see if we want to add it as one of our "approved" devices. We have two of seven iphones that have issues constantly, powering off, problems when headphones are connected, etc... We have taken them to the Apple store and supposedly they were fixed, but they continue to have the same problems. We have also had times when all the iPhone users did not have service, but everyone else did. The iPhone is not that great for viewing Excel spreadsheets. Most users love the applications, but those are mainly for personal use rather than company use.

randy_scadden
randy_scadden

I am on my 7th or 8th "smart phone" and have to admit that my 3G iPhone is the most well thought out device I have ever had the opportunity to use. It just hands down has the best feature set and user experience of any phone I have ever used. I really like the ability especially when I need to troubleshoot network issues both from within the internal network as well as from the perspective of an outside user by being able to connect to our corporate WLAN and then disconnecting from it and testing using the 3G external internet connection. It saves me from having to remote into my system at home to do external testing. Plus on top of that just the breadth and depth of the apps that are available for it are just amazing. Prior to my owning the iPhone I actually owned what in my opinion was the best Windows Mobile phone in the AT&T Tilt. What sold me on switching to the iPhone was when my wife and I decided to go see a movie. Well I pull out my trusty Tilt and do the good old google search of showtimes: zip code and get all of the upcoming show times. By the time that I had done that my wife had already pulled up all of the show times within a 15 mile radius was able to determine how long it would take us to drive from our current location and oh ya click on this link and you can actually see a trailer of the movie or any of the other movies as well. The feature set on the 3G iPhone is second to none so I would highly recommend it.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

Now, almost every time I'm on the highway, I will eventually see a car weaving in and out of a lane. It used to be you assumed they'd been drinking. But when you get close, it's some idiot texting or the like. I'm one who is instinctively against overregulation. But this activity should certainly be against the law.

Icelock
Icelock

I have a G1 From T-mobile and It's great! Touch Screen, Full qwerty keyboard, 3g internet, Open source apps, and I can even host a web page from my phone, but I really don't recommend it. The G1 also allows 5 different desktops on the phone. I really love my Phone.

sidekick
sidekick

I got a chance to use one in setting it up for someone. I like the click aspect of the touch screen. You can make sure you pressed the right key before actually pressing it. I have dainty little fingers, so it's not much of a problem for me, but I know some people that can never seem to hit the right key on a little touchscreen.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Running Windows Mobile, with some additional software I downloaded and transferred to it for specific uses. What do I believe is best? One that suits your specific business needs. What functions do I use mine for? -I am on the road so I use MapQuest a lot, no need for GPS though it is an option for me if needed. -I refer to price lists a lot, my HTC stores Excel spreadsheets, and PDF's, which I can view, alter, email, or send to a customer's printer through their own WAN or Bluetooth connection. -I take a lot of notes during meetings, which I can jot in my own handwriting and the recognition is perfect. Creating nice Word docs which it will also print and save to PDF format, just like my notebook or desktop. - I also draw a lot of diagrams when visiting new home building sites, for designing audio layouts and home theatre positioning. The scribble I draw on it is converted autoaticaly into a perfect line drawing for me to print or share electronically. -The screen offers portait or landscape presentation, sliding the keyboard in and out switches between the two. -Web browsing is excellent, Rogers speed in Canada is pretty good and the landscape display with full QWERTY keyboard makes browsing a slice for looking up customer websites and contact info. -The phone is really good, except I prefer the feel of a flip phone to a brick style for long conversations, hate headsets and speakerphones, even though it offers both options. -The camera is better than I have had on most phones, the lighting and exposure options are okay but it isn't really a dedicated camera anyway, but good for quick snaps or video on the go, taking pics of product labels or for snapping quick a pic of contact info painted on service vans of companies I want to prospect. -I rarely use the multimedia apps, WMP for example, I get enough of that on my notebook, don't need it when working too often. -It has a memo/sticky note feature, I can just jot things on the screen and it creates a little 'post-it-note' style of memo on the desktop. -It sync swith outlook to update customer appointments, notes etc. Makes my day easy as I just have to open my notebook and teh phones syncs with Outlook automatically while still on my belt. I think the most useful features to any smartphone for business has got to be creating and editing business documents, the ability to sync your appointment calendar and contact info and the ability to use handwriting on screen for quick notations. Without these features, I'd just use a cell phone (which I also have for personal use as I prefer the sound and comfort of using my Krazr). The feature set of my smartphone is exactly why I don't bother taking Apple's i-Phone seriously, it just doesn't offer any 'useful' functionality for business that other phones do not. Other 'smart' phones offer far more advanced and useful features that ease business life for less money and in more 'usable' devices. As the OP mentioned, the i-Phone was great for looking up competitive pricing at various stores (any web enabled smartphone does that though), it was great for obtaining info on an interesting car (which any Smartphone can do) but those are not business needs for most people and they are common features to any other smartphone. However other smartphones do all the things the i-Phone does PLUS offer useful business applications and tools that Apple isnt' even remotely close to providing without an entire device rebuild with different touchscreen technology implemented, which is never going to happen as they bought the company that developed and failed at using that same tech in the first place.

donnaw
donnaw

I personally use the Bold. I have to support many types of smartphones. To make this easier, at the end of this month I will begin using a program for remoting smartphones (like remoting PCs). I tested the program for a trial period and really liked it. In addition, the users really liked it! It is extremely valuable for troubleshooting issues for off-site and traveling employees. Because the users' needs vary widely within the company, there is not one device that stands out as a leader for business use.

frankiesmum
frankiesmum

For Work Use Started with a Pocket PC with Help Desk PDA plugin that is no longer supported (BBs only) and a *shared* cellphone, whoever was on shift got the cell. Currently use a Treo 700WX with IMAP for occasional email, text alerts, texting, calendar via GW PDAConnect, phone, camera for problem resolution (a picture saves a thousands words) and Office capabilities (notes on solutions, problems, users etc). For Work Support Mostly CDMA types including Harrier, Apache, Titan, Samsung W531, Samsung Global I325, Crackberry, Treo 700WX, iMate (phasing out), various Okta and Nokia phones of varying capabilities.

tonytechie
tonytechie

Have got the Imate ultimate 9502, is very costly pocket pc, use it all the time (when it works ) presently is in the repair shop, for lots of issues, no gps, incoming calls terminated unexpectedly, activsync playing up. Previously used a HTC apache, which was brilliant. am hoping that imate will fix this so that it becomes the business tool it should be. Imate's after sales support is extremely poor. Actually like my 9502 heaps, if i get back and everything works then will be very pleased.

flounder_pdx
flounder_pdx

My company issues BB 8703e's. We run our own BES server. Biggest problem I usually see is they get dropped/stolen a lot. I am currently waiting for mine to be upgraded to a Storm for testing. If I had my way, they could keep it. Nothing but a leash. My personal phone is an old motorola i90 (or something like that). They keep trying to get me to upgrade but I only use it for the phone. I dont even text on it and your lucky if I even turn it on to check my VM. I hate these things....they are a necessary evil but I hate 'em!!!

gr8britton
gr8britton

I used to have a Palm Treo with Windows Mobile. This Sumsung is SO much better. I really like the usable mouse and the qwerty keyboard layout is better than the Palm. Although the Palm's battery life is better, the Samsung gets me through the day. I would highly recommend this for business use...especially if you email a lot. The keyboard/mouse is much easier to use than using the iPhone.

eric.thoe
eric.thoe

I use a Blackberry 8830 for IT functions. We deploy that model and the Curve as well. They are also synced up with our exchange server. Hopefully in a few months we will start testing the Storm.

nzimmerman67
nzimmerman67

I have a BB Curve (8310). Came from a Treo 650 and then 700W. I support the BB Bold and Storm as well and all have their pros and cons (speed, brightness, etc). Most of the apps are the same. However, reviews say that the new Palm Pre should blow all of these outta the water. Maybe worth checking out

Chipv
Chipv

I have the iphone 3g 8gig model. Originally i got one for the music and phone aspect. i hated carrying 2 different devices. So, after Apple fixed the bugs from the first gen, i went for it and bought one. At first i was amazed at how great the graphics and games were. Then i slowly realized that this is basically a small computer in my hand. I can remote to servers thru winadmin, or VNC. It can handle all facets of emails with minimal or no issues. and it handles all the basic functions very easily. The hardest challenge is learning how to use the touch screen to type, but, like any smartphone, you learn their keyboard in no time, and your off to the races. My 2 cents

dmills
dmills

Great device. Go get one today!

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

Had been a Palm user since the '90s, so moving to the Treo was the logical jump. I couldn't function without my to-do list, and having my calendar, client notes, tech shortcuts, emulated HP calculator and other useful applications always with me in my pocket is invaluable.

ajohansson
ajohansson

for work. Also support BB 8700s and Pearls at work. Have support various Windows Mobile devices in the past. I keep trying to give mine away, but the boss won't let me. I dislike my electronic leash, whether it be a smart or regular cell phone.

TNT
TNT

I grant it's getting a bit dated, but with Samsungs free WM6.1 update and the ability to unlock the GPS it does most everything I need it to. The Good When doing inventory of all the computers in the building I entered the serial numbers of every PC, monitor and printer in Excel Mobile (I work for a school, so that's a lot of computers). I get my work email on the phone 24x7 and often use it to respond to situations after hours. Windows Live Mobile helps me get to conferences around town. I like Mobile Office (viewing attachements and making minor edits is a breeze) and appreciate OneNote being included now, though I haven't yet put it to use. The Bad No wi-fi, no touch screen, screen is small. The first two problems are solved in the new Samsung Epix. Might upgrade but am waiting to see what the market offers this summer.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

The worst is when I get a text of "Call me." ARRGGG...Why didn't you just f'ing call me!!???

mailboweb
mailboweb

I second this, the iphone is just not for this kind of work. Its more an newbie striped fashion product. Version 3.0 of the iphone OS will have Cut and past! Windows Mobile and Symbian devices are more to the task and more open for advanced professional work. Apple will get there, but not before an serious series of updates. Interesting part is that most what you see on the iphone has been road-tested on the Windows Mobile devices. Don't get me wrong, iPhone is an great concept and it is an added plus to an already more then 10 years growing mobile sea of devices.

sidekick
sidekick

I'll have to pass this along to him, thanks.

sidekick
sidekick

Last I knew, Massachusetts was considering a law banning texting while driving. I moved out of state and stopped paying attention, so I don't know whatever happened with it. It came about because a teenager died after crashing his car while texting.

sidekick
sidekick

I got to spend some more time with the Storm. I've never had my own Blackbery, but of all the ones I've used in supporting other people, this is still by far my favorite. I do find it a bit clunky, but I could get over that if I had one of my own. It still is not as good an interface as the IPhone. I've had a chance to play with one of those and an IPod touch (which is not an IPhone but the interface works the same) and it is the most sophisticated interface I've seen on a portable device.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Great tool indeed! I don't know how, other than a lack of marketing, that HTC hasn't been more of a front runner in smartphone choices (though I do see alot used for business these days), they offer incredible devices that do everything. Having sold $3000.00 handhelds for Enterprises and laughed at the cheap smartphone offerings, the HTC really surprised me with its ability to do anything you need it to. I now have an HTC P4000, which is simply dreamy.

techrepublic.com
techrepublic.com

I gotta start this by saying my wife and I use our phones for professional and personal use, but not in support roles. Also, I have never had a *PERFECT* phone, Jo Ro. Previously had a Palm Trēo 700p. CONS of the Trēo 700p: Palm was definitely NOT AT HOME with the audio and radio frequency circuit design! Horrible, LOUSY sound quality!!! No wired headsets nor bluetooth headsets (of the few which would pair with it!) made the sound any better. Get this: the PALM Trēo 700p would not pair with my PALM Pilot Tungsten T5! (HEY PALM! Give your loyal customers a fair deal!!) There were frequent magical random reboots, frequent dropped calls/weak signals, bad reception, only one [shift] key on the left (Try it. It really urked me to have to thumb the one [shift] and reach over with the right thumb to make caps on "left-hand keys".) Keep in mind, they had opportunity with the Trēos 600, 650 and 680 to work out the kinks. But apparently what I read from tech reviews/opinions, and from my own experience, Palm didn't work them out and the 700p just inherited them instead. PROS of the Trēo 700p: The rounded QWERTY keys were surprisingly easy to use accurately. My medium sized fingers worked well with them and I had fewer typos than I have on my BB. The calendar/todo list was Palm. Palm does that so well! Then, I got fed up with the lousy sound quality of the Trēo. The Verizon guy asked if I wanted to try the Trēo 750p. NO!!! So I got a BlackBerry 8830 World edition about 7 months ago. CONS of the BB 8830 World Edition: Seven months later and the calendar is STILL awkward to work with. No camera. Facebook app has limited functionality. (Verizon quirk: They only support BBOS 4.2 which limits my ?SD slot to 2GB.) More thumbslip typos on the BB's QWERTY. trackball gets dirty occasionally. "World Edition" is a stupid name PROS of the BB 8830 World Edition: MUCH BETTER SOUND QUALITY than the Trēo! Stabler OS. Better reception in all the same places I had been using the Trēo with the same carrier (Verizon), so the quality of the radio in different brands DOES count for something! Longer battery time, which I think the BB's unique PUSH method does a lot for it. VERY customizable, multiple moded ring/LED settings for in-holster and out-of-holster phone/calendar/SMS/PIN/Email/Facebook notifications. I still have lust for the iPhone but I don't care for the AT*T network. A friend picked up an unlocked iPhone in Belgium, popped in here T-Mobile SIM and it works great here in the 'States! Joe Ro, if I were you, I'd do the iPhone thing. You already have tech support living in the house with you!

bfpower
bfpower

I like it for business functions because it's business oriented. No camera to worry about people sending around pictures that could reflect negatively on them. It does have a uSD card slot, so it can be used for music listening, etc., but it's still work-focused. It's also rock-solid. We went to BBWE from Pocket PCs, mainly because the PPC was TERRIBLE. The World Edition rarely crashes (when it does, it's usually while on the Web, but it's rare). Its performance is good, and I would never want an on-screen keyboard.

ahm
ahm

I've got a Palm 755p - and am waiting to see the Pre before I do anything else. I just hope that Palm is solvent long enough to make it happen...

t.hsu
t.hsu

And I believe it is just a typo mistake!!

WasabiMac
WasabiMac

I've been using a Treo in some variation since they have been out. Has enough handy utility functions and a game or two to play while watching progress bars that it is always with me. Being that the OS has been in place longer than any job title I have worked, I am looking to upgrade. I tried the Storm and hated the click screen and will be migrating to an iPhone when they come out of beta (v.3 was enough to get HQ to approve) if it happens before September. The keyboard works better for me and the OS and functionality smoke the others for what I do and the way I do it. If not the iPhone I'll be rolling to a BlackBerry 8xxx something. Our folks aren't even looking at the new Treos; the company has made some really odd choices in the past few years and the powers that be are worried they'll be stuck supporting equipment from a vendor that has vaporized.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I have a friend that simply doesn't answer his phone, period. Texts replied to immediately, rings are a no go. I have texted him meeting times and he'll text back, "how about later?" What's stupid is he doesn't offer a suggested time. So I have to text back "No prob. When?" and wait for his reply, "It's up to you." This goes on and on, so I give up and send the text, "Just answer your phone or phone me!" So he'll text back, "8 o-clock?" Nice enough guy but drives me, and many others, right around the 'kin bend! He claims it's easier. Easier that what? Forming English words with your mouth? That's easier than tapping in a nonsensical message over and over again in the same device you can just phone with? Oh well, not the brightest bulb on the tree anyway.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

I'd agree that for most people, "hands free" is mostly safe. But then again, I've also seen plenty of people talking "hands free" who couldn't drive any better than the fools who were texting. Personally, I feel okay doing hands-free "chit-chat" while driving. But one thing I won't do is "tech support" where I really have to think hard to work someone's problem. Takes away too many of brain cells from driving.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

If that's the case, we ought to outlaw car stereos as well. How many million accidents have been caused by idiots fooling around with cassettes, CD, MP3 players?

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

But in this case I see people 'ready to die' all the time. I don' tknow how many times I've swerved away from some tool drivign across two lanes or seen an accident on one of our many bridges at rush hour due to some clown trying to talk, surf, take pics or text while driving. Face it, some people simply cannot breathe and think at the same time. If it reduces accidents, thus reducing insurance costs or saves even ONE life, such a law is worthy.

sidekick
sidekick

Some places here in the U.S. allow mobile phone use only if it's on speaker or a hands free device is used. I often hear the argument that it doesn't matter because it's the conversation that's distracting. Personally, I find the phone less distracting when I don't have to hold it. I don't know why, but it seems to be that way for me.

rtemple_au
rtemple_au

Here in South Australia it's been banned for some years, as well as using a handheld cellphone (mobile phone as we call it), while driving.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Let me see you drive while composing a text...I somehow think you will not be looking at the road.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...but it's a whole lot of "stupid adults" I see doing it on a daily basis. And each week, you hear of more and more deadly accidents involving this, usually involving a pedestrian or some unfortunate victim in another vehicle.

techrepublic.com
techrepublic.com

Isn't that just the way it is? One stupid kid does something dumb, and the State Legislature starts threatening to write a new law about it!

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...what do I do on the day where my 3-year-old Treo refuses to wake up?

techrepublic.com
techrepublic.com

If you rely on your PDA more than your phone, then your Trēo was a good choice, J McG.

techrepublic.com
techrepublic.com

... a good PDA with a really crappy phone attached. Kinda like if the Acme Company had made a clip-on grass-catcher kit designed to fit Honda, Snapper and John Deere lawn mowers. Or maybe more like... a clip-on tie on an Armani suit. Thank you, everyone! It's been very therapeutic for me to complain about my Trēo experience! I feel so much better, now. :-D

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

I definitely think it was a PDA with a marginal phone grafted on. It was a compromise I was willing to make, since I no longer wanted to carry two devices, and I rely on my PDA more than I wanted a really good phone.