IT Employment

Streamlining support, getting the job done

Is it right that, for some jobs, the help desk ticket takes longer to resolve than the job itself?

This week I witnessed IT support as it should be.

Last weekend Britain switched from Greenwich Mean Time to British Summer time, a painful annual event that deprives us of an hour’s sleep during the last weekend in March.

Most Windows-based PCs will, unless other controls have been enabled, change their clocks automatically, unless security restrictions have disabled the option.  I was in the office of a bookshop where the EPOS tills connected to a UNIX server via the office PC, running Windows XP. Apparently the clock changing is always fraught with difficulty, and this year was no exception.

IT services had removed the admin privileges from the local user as they had encountered problems with shop floor "experts" in the past.

The matter was resolved in a pristine fashion; the shop manager rang through to her IT department, told them the problem and which store she was in, and immediately, the support guy took control of the PC remotely, connected to each of the EPOS terminals, corrected the clock settings, and then tested and checked the settings.

We went down to the shop floor, logged out each of the tills in turn to allow the update, and when they were logged back on, the settings were correct. The tech stayed on the line all the time and checked that the update was visible at our end, then ended the call. The whole process took less than three minutes and there was no clumsy logging of job tickets, which-- for simple updates -- is the best way to proceed.

If it is necessary to record the work done by the support team, it is okay to enter small jobs like this into a log.

How often have you had a job where the help desk ticket takes longer to deal with than the problem?

7 comments
rakeshrai
rakeshrai

I wish my company implemented ticketing. I have trouble convincing my boss how busy I am.

bthorsda
bthorsda

We implemeneted a ticket system the only problem I have done alot of tickets that take longer than the actual problem fix. Also management didn't seem to know how to query the system to find out how much I did. Now I have a system where I put my time and ticket number in an excel spreadsheet, which means I put alot of my own tickets in. Kind of reminds me of big brother.

Joe_R
Joe_R

Your guys did the right thing. A ticket would have been a waste of time. I agree, it's not always necessary, and sometimes a waste of time, to fill out a ticket for small items. By the way, I hate the change in time twice a year. I'd love to see a cost associated with the change - people being late, loss of production, support, etc. I would be in favor of abolishing daylight savings time all together.

Jaqui
Jaqui

I detest the daylight savings time garbage. It's the only reason I'm considering moving to Saskatchewan, they don't use it. [ you know, one of them there Canadian Provinces we call the flatlands, where you freeze-dry your brains in winter and par-boil them in the summer, just like every place in north America that gets snow, EAST of the Rockies. ;) ]

Altiris_Grunt
Altiris_Grunt

Isn't there an expression, "If you didn't write it down, it never happened"? (I may be paraphrasing here...). You definitely need to document all incoming incidents, and just for CYA, all of your "proactive" stuff like DST tasks, even customer "drive-by" stuff. Just my $.02...

JamesRL
JamesRL

But proactive stuff can be documented in other ways - like email etc. DST is like a small project - the plan should be sufficient. James

JamesRL
JamesRL

I'd never suggest that tickets are there to track every moment of a help desk person's day or that of a desktop tech. They are there to track incoming complaints, not proactive issue management like the issue in the article. James