Linux

10 popular Windows applications that should be ported to Linux

The ranks of Linux users would certainly grow if a few go-to Windows apps could run natively on the OS. Jack Wallen lists the ones he thinks would turn the tide.

I can't tell you how many e-mails, phone calls, IMs, and Facebook messages I've gotten that asked when or if an application would be ported from Windows to Linux. Or how many times I've heard someone say, "I would use Linux, if X were ported to it!" So I decided to put these wishes to good use and list the top applications that should be ported to Linux. Some could be possible. Some are not (for whatever reason), which is a shame because the "not possible" tends to keep people from adopting Linux.

Many hard-core Linux users will tell those who have yet to adopt it to use Wine or Crossover Office to get their favorite application running on Linux. This, of course, is simply not a solution for the new user just trying to get accustomed to an entirely new operating system. These applications need to be ported over so they can run natively. When/if that should happen, Linux adoption will be rampant.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download and was originally published in the 10 Things Blog in March 2010.

1: Photoshop

Photoshop is, without a doubt, the de facto standard for image editing. It's also the application that users most often claim they'd like to see ported to Linux. Yes, there are plenty of other image-editing applications for Linux (some of which are quite good), but none can compare to the power and versatility of Photoshop. Back in early 2000, it was thought that the head of Adobe simply wasn't a fan of the open source movement. But then, a few years later, a developer from Adobe came forward to say that the company was more concerned with standards in the area of fonts, color management, and printing. Well, those areas have certainly followed standards (Freetype, OpenIcc, and Cups), so the reasons for not porting are growing slimmer and slimmer.

2: Quicken

Quicken is another application that people still depend on, even though there are many alternatives. Whether it's for home or small business use, Quicken takes care of financial needs that many of the open source alternatives can't match -- such as the ability to seamlessly integrate with tax applications, like Turbo Tax. And since Quicken is problematic when you try to run it with Wine, a port will be the only option (outside of running in a virtual machine -- which doesn't count in this instance).

3: AutoCAD

AutoCAD is yet another proprietary Windows application that has many alternatives for the Linux desktop, none of which completely fulfills the needs of the serious professional. There are good Linux CAD tools (such as NX, from Siemens), but for most users the very name AutoCAD is synonymous with CAD. So until AutoCAD is ported, professional designers who employ CAD applications will not be migrating to Linux. Ironic that AutoCAD was originally run on *NIX.

4: Dreamweaver

Dreamweaver is one of the more popular of web design applications. And, of course, there are plenty of web design tools for Linux. But very few tools can stand up to the tool that all others are judged by. Now Dreamweaver is one of the tools that can be run via WINE, but as anyone who has used applications with WINE knows -- it is not the same. I would have to say that porting the standard web design tool to Linux makes perfect sense, seeing as how so many web sites are run on the Apache web server. It's a marriage made in IT heaven.

5: iTunes

iTunes is currently the only application that will allow you to sync your iPhone or iTouch. I hesitated to put this sofware on the list, but more and more business users are relying on their mobiles for connectivity. And seeing as how the iPhone is the current standard in the smartphone arena, it only makes sense that iTunes should be ported to the Linux operating system. There are currently tools (such as ifuse) that allow read-only access to the iPhone/iTouch, but there is no way to fully sync with the hardware.

6: QuarkXpress

QuarkXpress is a must-have for many users, and none of the equivalent applications is as powerful or standard as Quark. I use Scribus for PDF creation, but it can't import Quark proprietary files, nor can it edit PDF documents (it can only create them). Scribus is an outstanding application, but Quark is one of the mainstays for larger business use.

7: Microsoft Outook

Outook is here for only one reason -- Exchange. Yes, there are Linux clients that can connect to an Exchange server, but none of them enjoys full Exchange support. For the home user, this isn't such an issue. But for the business user, it is. Many businesses depend on Exchange and (in some cases) allow only that software for serving e-mail and sharing calendars. If Evolution would finally get to the point where full Exchange integration is a reality, Outlook could be removed from this list.

8: Intuit QuickBooks

QuickBooks is Quicken's big brother. This version of the tool ups the ante, taking it to big business and enterprise computing. In the Linux, open source world, there really is no equivalent software that will get your business up and running as easily (and globally) as QuickBooks. You could cobble together a few open source tools to equal it, but is the time and effort worth it? Better would be a real port of QuickBooks to Linux.

9: Corel Home Office

Corel Home Office evokes a bittersweet memory of when the Corel Word Processor was ported to Linux. The tool worked well, and everyone saw signs that Linux was going to get all the necessary tools for a powerhouse operating system. But the rug was pulled out from under the feet of the penguin, and Corel stopped producing the Linux version. Now Corel has a home office suite, but only for Windows. Is this a necessary tool when there are so many outstanding alternatives, such as Microsoft Office and OpenOffice? Maybe not so much. But Corel once supported Linux, and a move to restore that support could initiate support from other companies. And remember, at one point, the WordPerfect word processor was the king of the hill.

10: World of Warcraft

World of Warcraft is a game. I hesitate to include any game on this list, but World of Warcraft is a completely different caliber. It is THE game and will remain THE game for a long time. At one point, Blizzard was one of the companies that supported Linux. You could get Diablo and Diablo II working on Linux. Now the games require Cedega to run. If WoW were to be ported to Linux, there would be a large number of migrations -- simply to play a game. Many apps and ship-jumpers would quickly follow.

What's on your list?

This list represents a collection of applications that would, almost certainly, bring leagues of new users to the Linux operating system. Are they all essential applications for all users? No. But more than likely, at least one of them is a must-have for you. What other critical apps would you add to the list?

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About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

83 comments
jfreedle2
jfreedle2

Linux is on its way out of existance, there is no need to port applications to a dead operating system. You must leave the dark side (linux).

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Itunes. That was the one that actually made me itch. What did *nix users ever do to Apple to justify the kind of punishment using Itunes would be? I don't even want that on my Windows machines and barely tolerate it on osX machines. Ideally, Apple would release interface specs or write there own plugins for existing *nix media managers. Photoshop made me giggle. My understanding is that Adobe tried this once before. They then claimed that there was no market since no one would pay the Photoshop asking price. This claimed without considering that they'd price themselves far outside of competition with existing alternatives. The difference between existing apps and Photoshop did not justify the difference in price between them. Not sure if that's true but it's the story I heard.

n2add
n2add

Your list included the two applications I would like to see ported to Linux: Quicken and WordPerfect. I have long been convinced that most users would not care what OS was on their systems as long as the applications they use work properly. There is very little difference between the Windows GUI and GNOME or KDE - nothing that couldn't be handled after a brief familiarization period.

parnote
parnote

Whoever decides to port their Tax software to Linux first will be the king of the mountain! Actually, I'm rather surprised that none of the tax software vendors has considered creating ONE version of their application, utilizing Java, that can be ran on any and all platforms, without the need to create special versions for each platform.

rajaiskandarshah
rajaiskandarshah

Lotus Notes (however ancient it sounds) would make a better replacement of MS Outlook. But then again, with Google Apps in Offline mode, who cares for either of the two ?

lastchip
lastchip

The Sage accounting software suites. It seems the whole professional accounting fraternity uses this stuff, as it's approved by the governments taxation department (HMRC). On a personal note; irfanview, the cracking little graphics viewer and basic editor. The Gimp is great, but sometimes I only needed a quick, simple viewer, with basic resizing tools and that's when irfanview came into its own. I really miss it now I'm using Debian.

georgelawlor16
georgelawlor16

A good Data base type genealogy program like Roots Magic should be ported to Linux for us old guys and our genealogy hobby.

songhurst
songhurst

Whilst OpenOffice might be an acceptable replacement for MS Office as it seems to handle spreadsheets, documents and power point well, it is not fully compatible with MS Access. For databases you seem to need to build everything from scratch. Dispite many searchs both on the OpenOffice site and on Google, I cannot find any manual for the OO Database. The help in OO Database makes MS help files look good. If anybody knows of a manual for OO Database I would like to know where to find it.

Gaius_Maximus
Gaius_Maximus

... just get the Libre Office guys to add the top 3 killer features of WordPerfect to Writer: Reveal-codes, the WP macro engine, and command-line switches.

rtrujillo@metalsurfaces.
rtrujillo@metalsurfaces.

Just switch to Apple to get most these benefits (plus Unix). I did. I'm a Windows Systems Administrator, but own more Macs at home. I only have one PC laptop. The rest are Macs.

jbb1
jbb1

...GRUB. And that usually installs automatically with a decent Linux distro. I'll add that some of the Linux equivalents are the equal of, or superior to, their Windows counterparts. Even when they miss the mark a bit, price-performance ratio almost always favours Linux software, especially open-source.

jkiernan
jkiernan

FreeCAD works well for me when I need to open prints and some 3D models. It's at http://bit.ly/R8f9y ... available for multiple OS platforms. I'm not an engineer, so I can't attest to its strengths or weaknesses when creating specs or drawings from scratch.

snorkleface
snorkleface

There's only one reason that I have to keep a computer running Windows. Tax preparation software like TurboTax. This is sad because I have been using Linux for over 10 years now and the only thing I need a windows computer for is doing my taxes. As another reader pointed out, everything else can be handled with Linux applications. Make GIMP more powerful and improve the features in some other Linux apps.

cavehomme1
cavehomme1

Ha ha! It will never happen of course. But penguin fans (I too have linux on 3 PCs at home), please don't tell me that Open Office, Evolution, Thunderbird is good enough. For a business user who has to fully integrate with other Office files completely seamlessly, it has to be MS Office. Despite its quirks, Outlook remains by far the best email and calendaring suite. Linux also needs to have smartpone syncing apps such as activesync (another ha ha) and Nokia PC suite. Dream on.

EJK
EJK

Turbotax is the primary reason I run VirtualBox on my Linus PC. I could live without Quicken, and may still move that data to GnuCash or something similar -- but there is no reasonable alternative to TurboTax.

mark
mark

Must include Visio !

adimauro
adimauro

I used Dreamweaver years ago, but it's gotten too bloated. It's only nice for people who like to drag and drop and build visually. For coders like me, JetBrains makes the best IDEs, including WebStorm or PHPStorm if you do PHP. They even have Python, Java and Ruby IDEs. And, best of all? They ALREADY work on Linux! The big three, Windows/Mac/Linux are all supported by JetBrains software. No matter what computer I'm on, I don't have to switch to a different IDE. It's great.

Dr_Zinj
Dr_Zinj

If you're shooting for a U.S. only market, with a small share in Western Europe, and a smattering of primarily English-speaking users scattered around the world, then a Microsoft-only game is okay. However, if you're a SERIOUS gaming company interested serious money in a world-wide customer base, you'll provide native access for all major OSes; which at the moment are Windows (of course), MAC, and the common Linux denominator. Emulators add a level of complexity that your average gamer is not going to want, or be able to, overcome. Plus, they add overhead to a system that may prevent the game from operating due to lack of memory or other hardware problems.

bblackmoor
bblackmoor

If Adobe CS (Photoshop, etc.) had a Linux version, I would not need any Windows machines at all, and could finally get rid of them. Nothing else on this list is a must-have. (And QuarkXPress? InDesign -- part of Adobe CS -- replaced that years ago.)

Sepius
Sepius

Even in the Windows world there are newer and better applications than outlook (Thunderbird by far). Although I have not used Outlook since 2003, by then it had the look of being old, tired and archaic. It makes developers very lazy as well, thinking it is the only contact, email client that hand-held owners use. Outlook must go from this planet for good, for the benefit of those who like real choice.

eCubeH
eCubeH

Animation is an area of great interest (though very limited knowledge). Curious to know how Linux based FOSS animation tools match up with those in the Windows world... On a separate note - I used to use DreamWeaver many years back, but since I moved to Fedora some 4 years back, have been very happy with Quanta Plus (for PHP / XML) and Eclipse (for Android / XML)

dosida
dosida

1: Photoshop Instead of trying to port Photoshop because some people can't be bothered to learn how to properly use the GIMP please let's just make GIMP more powerful. 2: Quicken 3: AutoCAD 4: Dreamweaver 8: Intuit QuickBooks Learn how to use the alternatives. 5: iTunes Reason for existing? cause some are really lazy and can't learn how to properly rip Audio CDs. Learn how to use the tools properly. 6: QuarkXpress Scribus is up to the job. For proprietary formats use Quark and export to other formats that Scribus can handle. Migrate your data don't port the program. 7: Microsoft Outook Learn how to use Evolution. It covers Exchange servers just fine 9: Corel Home Office Learn how to use OpenOffice/LibreOffice/AbiWord/Gnumeric etc etc 10: World of Warcraft Irrelevant. Linux Gaming is taking off all one needs to do is keep a closer eye on the Linux Gaming Scene and be patient I wonder why this trend to want to commercialize Linux... it's just going to end up turning it into Windows. It's gonna ruin it for everyone and just make businesses happy. Linux is for everyone and to make it a commercial product and put all the restrictions in its development (such as tight deadlines and features with hefty requirements in resources) will only bring the quality of the whole thing down instead of soaring it up to the top of the pyramid. Besides if a pyramid is not based on a strong base it will spectacularly collapse.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Rumors of it's demise can't have been greatly exaggerated; you're the only one who seems to have heard them. Supporting links or evidence for this deathwatch, please.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

A few posts here have mentioned tax software. I don't get why anyone buys TurboTax or any of the other consumer-oriented tax apps. You can do your federal taxes on line for free, and most state returns on line for less than the cost of a stand-alone app. Isn't the TurboTax on line the same as the retail app? Why pay for an app you're going to run once? Is it a question of data privacy, or something else I'm missing?

lastchip
lastchip

please let me know. I've drawn a blank too and OO Base remains a mystery, having consistently failed to get a basic database up and running. Having said that, databases are not a strong point for me, so perhaps I'm being a little unfair.

aminy23
aminy23

OS X is a great OS, but it will only legally run on Apple hardware. Many are against Microsoft because they have a huge software market share, and it would be sad if Apple ever gets a hardware and software monopoly. There hardware is overpriced, and I don't think OS X justifies the cost. It will also be horrific news for those who build there own computers, and all existing hardware will be useless which will be terrible for the environment.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Macs appear to be significantly behind the curve on 3D performance.

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

Certainly you may do that on your personal desktops, but an enterprise that must draw tens of thousands of employees from the available work force is a different ball game.

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

You don't seem to be aware of the millions of joes and janes that make up the work force. With Windows expertise, they can more easily find a new job when their company has downsized. Work force mobility is paramount. Linux is stuck in back office applications.

joels
joels

The vast majority of the publishing industry runs on InDesign CS. Photoshop, acrobat, flash, etc., all run seamlessly. We dumped Quark 10 years ago & no one has ever complained.

jkiernan
jkiernan

You're missing the point. Full interoperability with Exchange is what's necessary for the business world. Thunderbird 3 on Windows is horrendous. The interface is cartoonish, font rendering is totally botched, and reliability was flushed down the toilet. I regret updating. Lastly, I guess you can't see any irony in the preclusion of Outlook for freedom of choice.

atreides2112
atreides2112

Your post doesn't really demonstrate any knowledge of the way things work in the enterprise. For a home user, sure, you could learn GIMP or use other tools. But, when you get into businesses, entire production teams could already be trained on Photoshop. Why? Because they've been using it for years. The same is true for Quickbooks and Quark. These are mainstream programs that have become industry standard. When you've got an established user base in the millions, you're going to have a hard time switching them over. The other issue is the lack of polish with regards to many of the open source programs. If you've got to cobble together a bunch of pieces of software to get a somewhat cohesive system, at the very least we should hope that those pieces of software will interact with each other, at least a little bit, and not crash every ten minutes. It would also be nice to see an update more than once every three years. Finally, how about some useful documentation. About a year ago, I had a project where a customer had wanted to adopt open source software to lower costs throughout their organization. It was a medium business (500-1000 employees). Evolution does NOT work with Exchange (other than basic functionality). Firefox does NOT work with Sharepoint. We did attempt to use Scribus to replace Quark, but the only places it stuck were in tertiary roles. Scribus is a great program, but it's not as functional (or as polished) as Quark, which is a terrible shame given the price of Quark. I guess what I'm getting at is that Linux will never be adopted in the enterprise unless good, reliable, commercial software exists to help make the transition possible.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

For those conscious of such things, data privacy is probably much to do with avoiding websites. Personally, that's the biggest reason I stick to local apps. If I knew a server admin who also ran a website on that server which provided tax analysis and submission; I'd probably use it happily. For lack of that, I've found benefit in local apps: - data privacy as mentioned - I can reopen previous filings - pull data that carries forward from previous year's data A website could probably dump a data file to be re-opened for review or to contribute carry-forward data. Maybe an SQL dump file format or something. A webapp is going to inherently lack on data privacy though; a local app can remain local, a web app can't remain local. Another hitch may be site changes that make previous year's data un-usable where I can always go back and open QB2007 or QB2008 for the applicable data file.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I am just guessing, I have never used one of those tax programs before.

itssri
itssri

the article's talking about WINDOWS and LINUX, not OS-X. well you could of course say - 10 windows AND os-x apps that are needed on linux!

RipVan
RipVan

But thinking like tens of thousands of others isn't thinking "outside the box," is it?

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

wouldn't know there were running a Linux distro when you sit them down at a computer. They will see a difference in the display, but once they are taught the procedure they handle, they'll get used to it.

risely
risely

Yes very valid points. The Linux system works well, solid & fast, just feels good. But, one can't sit at a desk all day playing with an OS! Well most folk can't. Time is money. As said before Scribus is good, but there are so many things it can't do - print, scan, edit text simply etc. I can open Serif's PagePlus and do everything I need to do in one package and quickly. Likewise PhotoImpact is so much easier to use than either Photoshop or Gimp. The much talked about Wine program only works with a very few windows programs. However, I still use Mint for those jobs I can do in Linux. It just feels good.

bblackmoor
bblackmoor

You appear to using the word "enterprise" to mean "lazy and obsolete". Not every enterprise is run that way (just the "Microsoft shops").

dosida
dosida

Let's just say that I know nothing about the enterprise. And I probably don't you're right there. What exactly are the requirements that the enterprise puts on software that open-source solutions DON'T have? Do they lack the lustre? the functionality? The support? The documentation? All these are valid points, but at the same time does the enterprise know how Linux and FLOSS software processes really work? or do they just want the tool to behave like Windows so they don't have to retrain their people (essencially looking for a cheaper Windows knockoff)? And besides. WHY do you need Linux on the enterprise? The enterprise has it's own Microsoft-based systems and relentlessly refuses to try something new. This is why we have so many people eating up what Microsoft, Oracle, Intuit and other companies are feeding them for so long. But some are already trying to break the rules there. Take LSE for example. With their new Linux based system they got record speeds in trades. It's easier to say that Firefox is not compatible with Sharepoint rather than try to get a straight answer from Microsoft as to why they don't follow standards like the rest of the enterprise world does and have to do things their own way? But hey Microsoft is Microsoft right? Bottom Line is Linux can work for the enterprise as long and as soon as the enterprise becomes a bit more open-minded and a bit less lazy. Sure you got people trained. But how much does their training make them flexible to use tools that are not so mainstream and do the same task as with their ordinary tools? Those who have done so have not lost. They gained. Exchange Server support is basic on Evolution? Get the IT guys to contribute to Evolution and you'll see in the next iterations Exchange support will be there. Linux is a "want it but don't have it? Go make it" kind of deal. Enterprise or not... people need to regain control of their tools instead of being handed one program and that's it. And enterprise should teach the rest of us and learn from the rest of us IF any attempt for Linux and Open source to enter this ecosystem. Otherwise all this is purely academic isn't it?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

To be honest, I'm at the same place as you; there is information there but how can it be abused. This combined with the Mr Steel's first rule of information; all information given out will eventually be used for purposes not intended. The biggest threat may be personal information; names, addresses, SIN/SSN number, wife's information, children's information. The most likely being an insider breach on the data server or a database lost on a flashdrive/laptop. You also have the risk of company retention practices; if data hangs around, the company can be obliged to hand it over. if on hard times, they may be required to derive any profit from the data that they can.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't think I care who knows how much I make or how much I had withheld. That may be because I don't know what could be done with that info, other than target my income bracket with the appropriate spam.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

With the online app, you have to provide intimate information to an unknown third party for storage and processing on there server. "Pay for our local app or give us your deets for free" (as I admitted elsewhere though, if I knew the server admin and webapp dev well, I'd probably have no personal issue using their service)

fairportfan
fairportfan

...the main difference between buying TurboTax and using the free online version is paying for it. Thanx, i'll keep using an online service.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

At 40 or 50 for a dial-up 56.4bps; someone's getting robbed. Well, your dialup isp market may suck also. I'm seeing about 24$ advertised by Tech Savvy around these parts.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I dropped dial-up about two years ago, but at that time I was only paying about $16 USD a month.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Cheaper in some areas though if high speed is also available.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

although more people are going 'cellular only', and not having a land line eliminates that option.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Perhaps for those people's computers that are so infected that they can't even open their web browser???

Slayer_
Slayer_

At least in Manitoba it seems to be. I very significant percentage have no internet access, and others have access to 56k dialup only. Only people in the city or close to the city have cable/dsl. Computers have no trouble playing games and being word processors, sound system,s burning CD's, etc. without internet access.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Now I really don't see why anyone bothers buying it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If it's in a secure environment, odds are you aren't going to be allowed to install a retail tax package anyway. If it's in a home environment, I suggest you'll get more value from your computer with an Internet connection, more than you'll get from a once-a-year tax app. Can't afford the monthly connection charges? Odds are you don't make enough to get any benefit from the tax app; you can probably file the 1040-EZ form (A. What did you make? B. How much tax is due (see table)? C. What was withheld? Subtract B from C. Where do we send the check?)

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

There are many reasons that TurboTax must connect to the internet. The IRS (in the US) doesn't finalize many tax code revisions until after the product must be available in the marketplace. Intuit then frantically prepares updates and distributes them. TurboTax will prod you to update on installation and again when you are ready to finalize your tax return.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

But there are going to have to be a lot of advantages (including ROI) before an organization can justify converting existing functional systems over to new platforms. When does researching alternatives end? You can't spend all the time chasing the next most efficient solution; you'll never get one implemented.

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

Are all identical? I would think that any "enterprising" organization would do the research to determine what best suits *their* need. To assume that MS Office will be good for all seems asinine when there are alternatives for Windows. In their research they might find alternatives to Windows, too.

Orodreth
Orodreth

I'm sure you're correct about Windows Enterprise support. OTOH, Linux users have very few Windows applications they want ported to Linux and like the Mr. Wallen those are generally preferences. Mr. Wallen doesn't seem to do his homework either because Scribus has been ported to Linux. Exception is ActiveX/DirectX games running natively on Linux, although some Windows games and applications run fine under Wine, VMware, CrossOver Linux, etc. Otherwise, Mr. Wallen's list doesn't speak for most Linux users. Point of fact, quite a number of Linux users haven't used Windows in years, even those who have dual boot Linux and Windows machines.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

That's my personal interest in it. I'd like to reboot less. Games run on my primary home desktop. A few Windows specific apps do also. Everything else I use run on *nix. I have enough hardware to happily run Shogun Total War in the foreground with whatever going on in the back ground. I just want run a few turns through and check back on my other tasks but nope; rebooting to Windows will require putting all other tasks on hold (or restarting them). My game playing and purchasing has decreased as a result of not being able to simply run the game without booting over to Windows. Tax season is another example. Quickbooks is fantastic at this time of year. Oh.. but again, you'll need to boot up Windows for that bit of annual joy. I'd really like to pop open my tax app and data without first pondering what I have to save and shutdown for reboot. At least with Quickbooks, I have the option to use a Windows VM to save closing everything else just to confirm an accounting data point. VM technology is not there yet for gaming though. For games, you still need to be against bare metal and OS so you can see all the gaming hardware. I can't yet just pop Shogun Total War open in a VM and go. Hopefully soon though.. Nvidia latest drivers, Debian 6 going Stable, Virtualbox including full 3D GPU access.. I'm not going to push Crysis2 but I'll get some fun out of older games.

tbmay
tbmay

...worked in production environments, and don't realize playing with computers is NOT the purpose of the business. I'm a little disappointed to see FOSS become such a cause of fanboys to begin with. For me, some of the greatest benefits associated with it come from it's lack of commercialization. There is some darn good code to be found in FOSS and if projects start pushing to make deadlines, etc., to appease the masses, that will erode. Or, at the very least, the reputation of the code will erode, even if those who care still know how to find the good code. I use BSD and Linux as part of my business, but the end users generally don't know it. With few exceptions, they don't care. They just want to do their jobs the same way they always have. They have NO interest in learning something new. For better or for worse, that's the way most people look at IT. We're a necessary evil.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't know too many people who support Windows in an enterprise environment who push to have their apps ported to Linux. Most of what I read on this subject is from Linux supporters who think porting those apps will improve Linux' chances of getting installed on enterprise desktops. I'm pretty sure that was the intent of Jack Wallen, the article's author. What some of those advocates (but not Jack) don't seem to get is there's more involved in a company-wide OS migration than merely desktop applications. Regarding #10, there's also a strong contingent of Linux users who want to see the most popular games ported to the Penguin. I can't blame them for wanting that, but I can't blame the developers for ignoring an (unprofitably?) small segment of the market.

dosida
dosida

Why are all the enterprise-savvy people then just complain that Linux isn't for the enterprise? It's MUCH easier to get Microsoft to give you crumbs of free stuff in exchange for sales contracts :) Why bother with Linux altogether? Linux doesn't NEED Photoshop or TurboTax or any other program on that list. Distros have their own tools. Honestly Palmetto please enlighten me. Out of curiosity, why do people in the "Enterprise ecosystem" always try to push for Apps ported to Linux that they already have in their Window machines?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"...does the enterprise know how Linux and FLOSS software processes really work?" At the enterprise level, we don't care how the software is developed, just how well it functions and is supported. "or do they just want the tool to behave like Windows so they don't have to retrain their people" Yep, you got it. "But how much does their training make them flexible to use tools that are not so mainstream and do the same task as with their ordinary tools?" What's wrong with using mainstream tools? They're often mainstream for a reason. If I can do the task with a mainstream tool, why do I need another? "Linux is a 'want it but don't have it? Go make it' kind of deal." But if what I want already exists for Windows, why bother making it for Linux?

michaewlewis
michaewlewis

"Linux is a "want it but don't have it? Go make it" kind of deal. Enterprise or not... people need to regain control of their tools instead of being handed one program and that's it." That's part of the reason why Linux won't make it in the enterprise world. When most IT admins are already doing the work of two, trying to test something that doesn't work in order to make it better for someone else's project just isn't possible.