Windows

Are you ready for when your enterprise hardware fails?

Since we established that Windows XP will be around for awhile, the question becomes, when do you plan to upgrade the hardware.

During the past few weeks I have been picking the brain of the TechRepublic Community of IT professionals about their plans, or lack thereof, regarding Microsoft Windows XP. The results of the poll questions make it quite clear: with regard to enterprise operating systems, the majority of decision makers are not planning to migrate off of Windows XP anytime soon and not at all until some reason presents itself that makes the move a necessity.

Part of my curiosity was sparked by my own recent need for a new workstation. My 5-year old Dell desktop was dying, and I requested a new workstation. I received a mid-tower HP with 3GB of RAM and a dual-core AMD CPU. Coupled with a DVD player-burner, I was very happy with the hardware. However, as a company, CBS Interactive is still on the Windows XP platform. I began to wonder how much longer XP would be the operating system of choice for the enterprise now that the natural product cycle of the installed hardware base is aging.

Question

So, since we established that Windows XP will be around for a while, the question becomes, when do you plan to upgrade hardware. Are the desktops in your enterprise failing at increasing rates? Are you planning to purchase upgrades all at once or just replace what needs replacing whenever it happens?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

7 comments
danar96
danar96

I'm attending an academy for a 2-year degree working with Adobe CS3, Max 3ds and more. Most of these programs failed with Vista on my desktop. So I purchased a laptop with Windows XP and my programs work great. I reverted back and intend to stay with XP. danar96@vtlink.net

sidekick
sidekick

Ya, I wish I could replace computers before they died. I would love to get some of my users a decent computer. I have not yet been able to convince management that the increased employee efficiency will cover the cost of the computer.

blackepyon01
blackepyon01

Management has never had to support and maintain these things (computers)

fatman65535
fatman65535

(satire) Please explain why you are repeating yourself?? I have always held that dumb and management are often one and the same thing. (/satire) A colleague of mine has been trying to replace a couple of machines at his workplace because they "have one drive in the grave". Management keeps telling him that there is "no budget money" to replace these machines. Yet, management has decided to make sure that some of their perks have NOT been cut due to the sluggish economy. Since we are speaking about a small privately held company; my colleague is trying to decide if he should speak to the owners. Or should he wait until one or more machines fail, and let management take the hit. He has done all of the necessary CYA (with lots of paper, by the way). My recommendation is to let management take the hit, (i.e. 'step out of the way, when the "fan" starts up').

macgvr
macgvr

We used to try to replace 3 computers a year, we are a small firm, to keep the life cycle within the 5 year range. Two things changed that, hardware got better such that even older machines ran acceptably for a longer period of time, and, money got tight. So here we are, I have some computers that are now 6 and 7 years old. I have discussed the need to do something but the response is, when the economy improves we will.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

When do you plan to upgrade hardware. Are the desktops in your enterprise failing at increasing rates? Are you planning to purchase upgrades all at once or just replace what needs replacing whenever it happens? What are the hardware issues you find yourself dealing with most often these days?

pgit
pgit

Hello, Mark. I don't work for one company, I'm all over the place, even dealing with individuals. (a lot lately it seems) To a one of them, so far as I know, they will not replace any hardware until it breaks. In the aviation biz we used to call this "achieving maximum utilization." Problem lately is obtaining XP. The bigger clients mostly have a proprietary app or two that runs great on XP, but like crap on vista. Furthermore, thanks to tech republic's excellent writers, I was able to determine that all of these apps will require XP mode if windows 7 is pre loaded on any new hardware, meaning we'll have to be very careful about what hardware they obtain. It also means windows 7 pro or ultimate. So most of these operations see the future as rather bleak. Win 7 is going to drive up costs across the board.

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