Microsoft

Build a simple timesheet in Excel

Excel makes it easy to set up a system for tracking time. Follow these steps to create your own or download our sample timesheet template and customize it to fit your needs.

The process of tracking time is unique to every employee or position, so there's no one-size-fits-all sheet that will do the job. Still, certain principles and features will generally play into most timesheet models. For instance, before you start formatting cells and entering formulas, you need to decide why you're tracking time, who's going to use that information, and how:

  • Decide on a time period. (Management will probably make this decision for you.) Most of us track hours weekly, biweekly, or monthly.
  • Tracking just time isn't always enough. Many companies bill your hours back to clients. Therefore, you must allocate your time to specific projects.

This article will show you how to create a weekly timesheet you can easily adjust to track biweekly and monthly times and projects. As is, this sheet doesn't document breaks or allow for flexibility in scheduling. However, the basic structure and formulas are present, so you can easily customize the sheet to fit your needs.

Note: This article and sample timesheet are available as a free download.

1: Determine your needs

When preparing a template other people will use, you need to consider several options:

  • How to solicit and validate input from users to eliminate typos and other invalid data.
  • How users will access the template -- from an Excel workbook on their local systems or via a browser and a Web-based application.
  • How to protect the template sheet so users can't alter formulas and automated features.
  • How to secure confidential data.

If you're creating a timesheet for yourself, your job is somewhat less complicated.

2: Enter labels

The first step to actually building the timesheet is to enter the appropriate labels. That includes the following headings:

  • All applicable employee information, such as name, social security number, employee identification number, department, and manager. Include only data that's truly required.
  • A time period. This could be the first day of the work week, the start and end date of a bimonthly time period, or even the first day of a fiscal month.
  • Generating dates is necessary. Including the names of the workdays might seem unnecessary, but your users will probably appreciate your attention to helpful details.
  • Time in and out, breaks, sick, vacation, overtime, and so on.
  • Subtotals and grand totals, as required.
  • Employee and approving manager signature lines, if required.
A weekly timesheet for tracking hours might resemble the one shown in Figure A. Enter meaningful labels in bold, center the column headings, and apply the appropriate borders. You'll want to customize the labels to fit your specific needs.

Figure A

Enter the appropriate labels to identify your timesheet data.

3: Automate the dates

You can require users to enter the dates manually, but that leads to mistakes, even with the best trained users. If you know the exact time period, the simplest solution is to automate the required dates as follows:

  1. Have users enter the first date of the time period in cell B2.
  2. In the first cell in the Date column, A7, refer to the input date using the formula

=IF(B2<>"",B2,"")
as shown in Figure B.

Figure B

Let the sheet generate dates based on the first date of each time period.

If the time period cell (B2) is blank, this formula returns a zero-length string. If there's a value, the formula returns it. The formula will return a date serial value until we format it (which we'll do later).

  1. In cell A8, enter the formula

 =IF(A7<>"",A7+1,"")
as shown in Figure C.

Figure C:

This formula adds 1 to the value (date) in cell A7.

  1. Copy the formula in cell A8 as needed. For instance, if you're tracking time by the week, copy the formula in cell A8 to cells A9:A13 for a total of seven rows (A7:A13). For a biweekly timesheet, you'd copy the formula to cell A20, and so on.

The next step is to enter a formula in column B that returns the name of the weekday for the dates in column A. To do so, enter the simple formula =A8 in cell B7 and copy it to cells B8:B13. (Later, we'll format B7:B13 to display the day of the week by name rather than the actual dates shown in column A.) If there's no date in cell B7, the sheet will appear empty.

4: Format Date and Day of Week columns

Right now, the General format displays serial values in the Date and Day of Week columns. First, let's format the dates in column A, as follows:

  1. Select A7:A13.
  2. Right-click the selection and choose Format Cells from the context menu.
  3. On the Numbers tab, select Date from the Category list, choose the appropriate format, such as d/m/yy, from the Type list, and click OK.

Next, format the dates in column B, as follows:

  1. Select B7:B13.
  2. Right-click the selection and choose Format Cells.
  3. On the Number tab, choose Custom from the Category list.
  4. Enter dddd in the Type field, as shown in Figure D, and click OK.

Figure D

The dddd format displays a date value as its day of the week.
As you can see in Figure E, the sheet clearly denotes the dates for which you're tracking hours. Now you're ready to start adding formulas for tracking time values.

Figure E

The sheet generates dates for each time period if you provide a beginning date (cell B7).

5: Enter a formula that calculates the first eight hours of each day

At this point, we need a formula that evaluates the In and Out time values up to and including the first eight hours of each day. If overtime isn't an issue, you won't need such a complex formula. However, for most hourly employees, overtime is a possibility. Enter the following formula into cell G7, as shown in Figure F, and then copy it to cells G8:G13:
=IF(((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24>8,8,((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24)

If the number of hours worked in one day is greater than eight, the formula returns 8. If the number or work hours is equal to or less than 8, the formula returns that amount. For now, the formula returns 0 because there are no time values to evaluate.

Figure F

This formula returns the first eight hours of each work day.

6: Enter a formula that calculates overtime for each day

Overtime constitutes hours over eight in any given day or any hours over 40 for the week. You should check your company's policy. This sheet simply tracks overtime by the day. How you compensate the employee isn't necessary at this point, as this sheet doesn't deal with wage earnings -- it just tracks time. To track overtime by the day, enter the following formula into cell H7, as shown in Figure G, and then copy it to cells H8:H13:
=IF(((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24>8,((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24-8,0)

Figure G

When the number of work hours is greater than 8, this formula returns the overage.

7: Format In and Out columns

Entering In and Out values can muck things up a bit if they're not formatted correctly, but before we format those cells, let's take a look at why you must. Figure H shows a few days' worth of In and Out values entered as general numbers. As you can see, the formulas just don't know how to handle them all.

Figure H

When calculating time, work with valid time values to avoid troublesome errors.

Now, you might think that a different set of formulas could handle general numbers. What would happen if you delete the *24 components in both formulas? Those formulas work up to a point, but neither handles all timelines. For instance, neither formula can handle an In value that's greater than its companion Out value (such as row 10 in Figure H).

To format the In and Out values appropriately, do the following:

  1. Select C7:F13.
  2. Right-click the selection and choose Format Cells.
  3. On the Number tab, choose Time from the Category list.
  4. Select the 00:00 format and click OK.

8: Provide In and Out default values

Because entering time values is prone to errors, consider providing default time values. That way, users will have fewer opportunities to introduce errors into the sheet. The default values you save with the sheet depend on each user's schedule, and you might have to provide individual sheets for many individuals. However, Figure I shows the most common 40-hour week schedule.

Figure I

Enter default time values to avoid user input errors.

The default values shown here are entered using a 24-hour clock. 13:00 is 1:00 PM (check the Formula bar) and 17:00 is 5:00 PM. You can enter 1:00 and 5:00, but you must train your users to also enter the PM. Excel will assume that 1:00 is 1:00 AM and 5:00 is 5:00 AM if you don't specify that it's PM. Either way, entering time isn't intuitive for most users, so providing the default values is helpful.

In this example sheet, Saturday and Sunday aren't regular workdays, so it stores 0 values. Of course, you can customize the days normally worked to suit each employee.

9: Enter defaults for sick and vacation time

You'll want to enter default values for sick and vacation time. In this case, just enter 0s and format as General displaying two decimal places, as shown in Figure J. Format these values as follows:

  1. Select I7:J13.
  2. Right-click the selection and choose Format Cells.
  3. On the Number tab, choose Number from the Category list and click OK.

By default, the Number format assumes two decimal places, but you might want to set that to 0. The two decimal places will allow employees to specify partial hours.

Figure J

Enter default values for sick and vacation time.

10: Enter a formula that calculates daily totals

The next step is to total the daily hours in column K. To do so, enter the following SUM() function in cell K7 and copy it to cells K8:K13, as shown in Figure K:
=SUM(G7:J7)

Figure K

This simple SUM() function totals daily hours.

11: Enter formulas that calculate weekly totals

You'll also probably want to calculate weekly totals for each category of time. To do so, enter the following function in cell G14 and copy it to cells H14:J14, as shown in Figure L:
=SUM(G7:G13)

Figure L

SUM() functions total weekly hours.

12: Validating sums

The week's total hours, which you'll want to display in cell K14, should be the same whether you sum the daily totals in column K or the hourly components in row 14. By checking both ways, you add a level of validation to the sheet. Should the totals not match, you want a formula that alerts you to the problem. Enter the following formula in cell K14, as shown in Figure M:
=IF(SUM(G14:J14)=SUM(K7:K13),SUM(G14:J14),"Error!")

Figure M

Verify subtotals using this IF() function.

13: Fine-tune the formatting

The sheet is now functional, but you'll want to add a few borders to distinguish the sections and totals. Just select each section and choose the appropriate border from the Borders drop-down palette. You might also want to add shading to the weekly total cells in row 14. Figure N shows the finished sheet.

Figure N

Add borders to separate sections.

14: Ensure valid input values

Users will have to change some data, but the sheet is specific in what types of values it needs. To protect the sheet's purpose, you can restrict users to specific types of data. For instance, cell B2 must be a valid date for the date- and day-generating formulas in columns A and B to work. Enable data validation for this cell as follows:

  1. Select cell B2.
  2. From the Data menu, choose Validation.
  3. On the Settings tab, choose Date from the Allow drop-down list.
  4. Choose Greater Than from the Data list.
  5. Enter 1/1/1900 in the Start Date field, as shown in Figure O, and click OK.

Figure O

Make sure users enter only valid values.

When validating this particular date, you can narrow things down a bit. However, if you just want to ensure that the input value is a valid date, the above works fine.

You can also ensure that the In and Out entries are valid time values, as follows:

  1. Select C7:F13.
  2. Choose Validation from the Data menu.
  3. On the Settings tab, and choose Time from the Allow list.
  4. In the Start Time field, enter 0:00. In the End Time field, enter 23:59 and click OK.

As with the date value, you can narrow down the acceptable times. You can even limit the columns individually. However, the "between 0:00 and 23:59" settings will reject anything but a valid time entry.

To protect the Sick and Vacation columns, set up validation as follows:

  1. Select I7:J13.
  2. Choose Validation from the Data menu.
  3. On the Settings tab, choose Any Value from the Allow list.
  4. Choose Decimal from the Allow list.
  5. Enter 0 and 8 as the Minimum and Maximum values and click OK.

Choosing Decimal in step 4 will allow users to enter partial hours. Choose Whole Number from the Allow list to restrict users to only hours. In addition, you can enter clues to the type of data the user must enter, as well as error messages. Applying validation rules adds the first layer of protection.

15: Protect formulas

Once the sheet is finished, add a second layer of protection by specifying what cells users can alter before you distribute it. You can do so as follows:

  1. Select a noncontiguous range consisting of the following ranges: B1:B4, C7:F13, I7:J13. (Hold down the [Ctrl] key while highlighting each range.)
  2. Choose Cells from the Format menu and click the Protection tab.
  3. Deslect the Locked option and click OK.
  4. Choose Protection from the Tools menu.
  5. Choose Protect Sheet.
  6. Enter a password.
  7. Uncheck the Select Locked Cells option and click OK.
  8. Reenter the password to verify it and click OK.
  9. Delete any test values, such as the date in B2.
  10. Save the workbook.

Now users can select only the cells they might need to update. Train your users to open the template and save a new file to create a new timesheet. That way, they can open the template with all the defaults to start each new time period.


About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

53 comments
pamheath
pamheath

I just created this timesheet for my office but for the life of me I can't get it to work.  I did all the formulas as indicated but the darn thing won't add up the hours properly.  Would it be possible to share the spreadsheet so someone could point out why it's not correctly calculating the hours?

sophieot123
sophieot123

We have been using http://www.officetimer.com/ employee time tracking software for our employees, and we are quite happy with it. Moreover, it is priced reasonably. It has all the features that harvest and freshbooks have.

UltraSilver64
UltraSilver64

I like the ideas you have there regarding tracking time from week to week, but have you tried doing this for a whole year - and in one workbook? We had a similar problem doing a Timesheet each week in Excel (one workbook per week), until one was developed that could tackle the whole year. I worked on this (learned a few new Excel tricks I didn't know before) and tested it with our Team for 6 months to iron out any possible bugs with it. Then showed it to Management for approval. It was made company-wide within a week. I've offered support with this Timesheet for the company ever since and everytime I come across a new problem with it, I learn something new about Excel I didn't know before. Excel can be tricky to monitor time at first, but once you find out its hidden quirks, it's easy!

ian
ian

Indicate a vacation by inserting V into C7 (Susans Monday In) In G7, add this =IF(C7="v",8)

tjsan42
tjsan42

When you copy or cut and paste from another spreadsheet, you can't paste into locked cells, as I would expect. However, when you paste into unlocked cells, the format of the target cells is overridden by the source format and the validation is completely ignored.

jhkolb
jhkolb

I created an Excel workbook years ago for use as our Company timesheet. Each workbook has a Sheet for each week of the year and a final sheet to track each employees sick and vacation time that is linked to each individual weeks timesheet. Every fall I go back and re-visit the excel file and make updates and adjustments as needed to fit our business and any changes made to Excel so everything stays fluent.

McGnity
McGnity

Thank you Susan once more for such a helpful, clear and very well explained tip.

jsowell42
jsowell42

Whew! That's simple eh? Don't misunderstand - I'm not knocking it, but man that seems like a lot of work! Thank you so much for sharing! I love knowing how to use my tools!

ppearsall
ppearsall

On my timesheet I need to indicate a "V" for a vacation day on that day of the week (the supervisor doesn't want to see a number). But that V must equal 8 hrs. Is there a formula I can create where V equals 8 when I type V and still be part of the sum of my weekly hours?

dogknees
dogknees

I like your step by steps, the following are things I usually do to make it easier on both the developer and the user. When you're adding the columns and formulae, if you do the first row before copying down, then when you enter the next row, or copy down, all the rows pick up it's format. ie Create all the columns, format them and then copy down. To assist the user in identifying the input cells, format them with a different colour fill to the calculated and header cells. I often add a colour to the calculated and total cells, and leave the input cells with no fill. I find it makes worksheets much more attractive if I leave column A blank and make it's width about the same as the row height. I usually also leave row 1 blank. I often also use a dotted border between input rows to make it a bit more like a paper form. If you do this and add thin borders between the columns, you can then turn off gridlines in the View tab and you get a nice form on a white background. This assumes you leave a blank column at the left. Regards

raj_as
raj_as

Good explanation in manage our time in excel sheet but important to every one Now days, all humans know about how much time to spend in one project? and how to schedule it to improve. Time Management is very essential to utilize your work and your employ's work.. Now, we started to develop [Time sheet] : http://qualitypointtech.net/timesheetdemo/index.php web application It is best and efficiency application for monitoring working time and available for employee wise/Project wise/Date wise time report. Just work with our [Time Sheet DEMO VERSION] : http://qualitypointtech.net/timesheetdemo/index.php More Details about [TIMESHEET Application] : http://qualitypointtech.net/webtimesheet/index.php

tiemle
tiemle

Great example. Thanks so much

jen2swt
jen2swt

What is the best way to run a report from said Timesheets? I am using this recordkeeping. Say I want to run a report for said employee to see the first day they started and the last day they worked. What is the best way to record. Should I do a timesheet for all weeks or just a continous workbook for each employee?

maryannwaring
maryannwaring

The timesheet I'm working on is for a salaried employee and has hourly breakdown columns of "straight", "holiday" and "maternity leave"...no "overtime" column. If a person works 9 hours in a day, I don't want the extra 1 hour to go to "overtime"...I want it to stay in the "straight" column. But, without translation of the current formulas, I don't know what adjustments to make to the formulas to make them come out right. Can someone help?

Brian8899
Brian8899

I think you meant =A7. When i put =A8 into the specified cell the days started on the wrong day the last day didn't come out since it was moving into a blank cell

xcel-pro
xcel-pro

All, Someone on Mr Excel helped me with the formula for working past midnight some time ago Here is the formula: =ROUND((MOD(G2-D2,1)-MOD(F2-E2,1))*24,1) Tested for several different scenarios, worked for every test case. You will need to enter all times in Military time (24:00) Ex: 12 midnight = 00:00, 8am = 08:00, 2pm = 14:00 (12+2)

evienne
evienne

how should i correct it?

joelec
joelec

Our company goes from overtime to double time after 3 hours of overtime. How do I adjust the overtime formula and recreate the double time formula.

swifttime
swifttime

The Swifttime is an electronic web based application making it easy for employees and managers to improve work efficiency. Best suited for firms with remote employees and companies with hourly employees where proper documentation of working hours are required. This application can be accessed from any web based device like mobile devices(Blackberry or iphone). It has following advantages: ? Provides a menu driven user interface. ? High accuracy in payroll management. ? Employees and managers can easily access this application via Internet or mobile devices. ? No start-up cost is required. ? Nightly backups of all data. ? Helps to ensure compliance with federal wage and hour laws. ? Advanced reporting module. ? Integrated billing and invoicing module. ? Data can be exported to Excel spreadsheets for further processing. ? Integration with payroll programs like ADP, Quick Books, Peach tree and others available Visit : http://www.swifttime.me/

jamesxxx
jamesxxx

Hi, I am creating a timesheet that has needs both daily overtime and overtime after 40 hours worked. So in your timesheet ,for example, works 10 hrs on Monday then that is 8 straight and 2 ot, then he works until Saturday at 8 hours per day, so Saturday should show no straight hours worked, only 8 ot hours. How can I have a formula that calculates daily ot and ot when over 40 hours. I need both as this is common

RRB
RRB

The tricky part is entering the time values. In figure H, they are entered as decimal numbers, meaning that 8.5 is actually 8:30. It is easier, up to a point, to enter 8:30, 17:16 or whatever time you like, directly and I concur with the author in using 24 h format as it is easier. Excel uses a convert the calendar and hour systems to a decimal system. 1 is one day, 0.5, 12 hours and so on. That way it facilitates the calculation. Try entering several hours as 8:15, 8:20 and so on, and then format the number as general and you will see the decimals. If an employee works past midnight, you will have to enter the date also. For example: In 1-10-10 22:00, Out 1-11-10 6:00. That way you are always substracting the lesser from the greater number, and you don't get negative numbers. If you want a speedy way to enter time values, you might consider using one column for the hour, another for the minutes and another to convert. For example; A2=8, B2=30, C2 contains the following formula =A2/24+B2/24/60 and then format as hours.

michael.barnett
michael.barnett

This is great and doesn't seem so "simple" to me :) However, I also have to compute (during the same work week) any compensatory time our non-exempt employees earn each week. Whereas overtime is total hours over 40 that the employee actually works, our employees accrue compensatory time when any combination of work, vacation, sick, etc hours total more than 40 during the week. Any "simple" solution for this would certainly be appreciated.

stephenc
stephenc

Better check the formulas for calculating the hours for each day. The same formula =IF(((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24>8,8,((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24) is used for both the first 8 hours and for the overtime. The overtime calculation should be: =IF(((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24>8,((D7-C7)+(F7-E7))*24-8,0)

jblvlma37
jblvlma37

A Very good breakdown of a how to. I applaud your site and it help to the people like myself whoare self taught in both software and hardware. Thanks a whole lot. I will be using this for myself and my sister in laws business.

ssharkins
ssharkins

I'm glad you posted about your success! My tips and 10 steps are only one way to provide a solution. I try to show basics and how to use features so that users can use what they've seen to fit their custom needs. It's great when a solution is exactly what a user needs, but more often than not, it's just the beginning, or it's just a piece. :)

dogknees
dogknees

Then it doesn't mess with the formatting. It's a bit of a pain, but until MS change the behaviour, it's the best option. Try adding it to the Quick Access Toolbar.

ssharkins
ssharkins

I'm glad you found it useful.

MiriahK
MiriahK

is there an excel tutorial on how to formulate all my weekly timesheets to be input to a yearly timesheet.

rdombroski
rdombroski

In our state employees are paid OT for over 8 hours in a day in addition to 40 hours in a week. The simple timesheet would work for me if it factored this in. Anyone have any ideas? I am driving myself crazy trying to figure this one out!

fadiluta
fadiluta

This timesheet is simple, but I need to add something in formula for not calculating Saturday and Sunday as regular hours. We use monthly timesheets, sometimes we have to work on Saturday and Sunday (usually Saturdays and Sundays are overtime hours, in rare cases are compensation hours) My question is how to make the Saturday?s and Sunday?s hours as overtime? Thanks in advance Fadiluta

bobjorg
bobjorg

That is a good point about employees whose shift or overtime period includes midnight. Such "graveyard shift" workers must enter the date as well as the time. Is there a way to simplify this? Most Excel useers don't realize that it comes with the programming language VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) which can automate much of this. However, VBA can be complex to learn since many of the features are not intuative.

dhays
dhays

Ours was a little more complicated as it allowed 3 sheets at a time active, when the fourth two week period was opened the first of the three became no longer active, any changes made in it no longer were automaticaly calculated nor added to the annual summary sheet. It was setup for a 26 payperiod year, if we happened to have a 27 payperiod year (once in a great while), then it took more work. The gentleman who had set it up had formulas for everything, in locked hidden cells, that not only provided for calculations but for drop down lists, automatically popluated the days of the week, the payperiod span, the number of hours for overtime, comp time, anyother time not worked...We have since been moved to an Oracle based system that does about the same thing, we also had spreadsheets for our Labor Distribution Codes to help management figure out how their money was being allocated, and for the technicians, it was a way of "charging" their time to a project, the new system is similar, it just standardizes timekeeping across the different divisions, providing a central database accessible from any computer.

broccili
broccili

Mike, Do they accrue time off at a regular pay rate, or at a time-and-half (overtime) rate? The simple solution up front: if you built the spreadsheet from this tech republic article you have an Overtime field, and that would be your hours OT for a pay period. Might need to tweak the scale/calculations to adjust for your employees!

ssharkins
ssharkins

Thank you so much -- I apologize for the inconvenience.

dwight.wright
dwight.wright

I noticed the same issue but validated tht the downloaded file has teh correct formula

ssharkins
ssharkins

You probably don't need a complex formula. First, your overtime hours for Sat and Sun are already there in your subtotals -- any Sat and Sun time is overtime, right? Just sum them. Then, subtracting your Sat and Sun hours from the straight time would compensate there, right? If I misunderstood your requirements, just let me know.

ssharkins
ssharkins

I think there's a formula that can handle expanding midnight, without requiring both dates -- I'll see if I can find it.

michael.barnett
michael.barnett

They accrue at regular rate and the spreadsheet would have to be configured, if possible, to differentiate between overtime or comp time while providing a weekly, or in our case, monthly total. Way over my head for sure!

fadiluta
fadiluta

Thank you for your prompt answer, ssharkins.. ?any Sat and Sun time is overtime, right? Just sum them. Then, subtracting your Sat and Sun hours from the straight time? For the time being I am doing the same, but this has to be done ?manually?, and when I do that it happens that time to time I forget some hours for our employees. So I believe that having a complex formula that makes hours of Sat and Sun as overtime would saved me (and probably many other, too). I believe that formula has to be something like this on G7 =if(B7=sat or sun,0,(then the other part of the formula), on H7 =if(G7=0, sum (c7:f7), (than the other part of formula), (I have tried this but I got lost) Thanks in advance

ssharkins
ssharkins

There's no column for holiday pay in the sheet. You could easily add one. Or, you could use what's there, as is and enter holiday hours as vacation. However, I think if an employee gets paid holiday pay, a separate column would be easier to track. The sheet doesn't deal with compensation, but that would be easy enough to add by adding a row that included rate for each column and totaling them. I don't think most companies would honor comp/overtime in a holiday week, but you know, they might. That's why the sheet is so simple -- every company has their own policies, but this sheet can be easily enhanced to provide more information. Excel can do it all for you, if you use the right formulas!

ssharkins
ssharkins

The example sheet still handles your situation, doesn't it? You just go buy the total at the bottom rather than the daily subtotals. Wouldn't this work?

michael.barnett
michael.barnett

Another thought I had, just to give you more detail. It is possible for a n/e employee to accrue overtime and comp time in the same week. Example: Monday is a holiday (8 hours) then the employee works 11 hpd Tue-Fri. Total hours for the week would be 52 hours. Of that, 4 would be computed as overtime (x1.5) and 8 would be computed as comp time.

michael.barnett
michael.barnett

Thanks for your response. The key for us is not how many hours an employee works per day, but per week. (Our work week is Sun-Sat.) We are not tied to working an 8 hr day. For exampe, my supervisor grants me the latitude of a flex schedule and I work 8.5 hrs M-T, then 6 hrs on Fri. Even though I work more than 8 hrs per day, my schedule only totals 40 hpw. If I happened to work 7 hrs on Friday, then I would accumulate 1 hr of comp time for the week. It's the same for n/e personnel, except they do get the overtime for hours physically worked over 40 per week. Hope this makes sense.

ssharkins
ssharkins

We can come up with a formula for you -- but I need all the details. Now, the overtime in this particular sheet is greater than 8 hours worked in any given day, but it only considers actual hours worked. You want anything over 8 hours in a day that also considers sick time and vacation? That one confuses me a bit -- if an employee took 4 hours of sick time and then worked 5 hours, they'd be an overage of 1 hour. Why wouldn't the employee just claim 3 sick hours instead?

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