Windows

Determine if your hardware can support Windows XP Mode in Windows 7

Greg Shultz helps you cut through all the hype surrounding the hardware requirements for running Windows XP Mode in Windows 7 by describing the procedures he went through to determine if hardware would support Windows XP Mode.

One of the most innovative features in Windows 7, from an IT perspective that is, is the new Windows XP Mode. This feature makes it easy to install and run Windows XP applications right from within Windows 7 by way of hardware-based virtualization technology and the new Windows Virtual PC utility -- the successor to Microsoft Virtual PC.

I've wanted to experiment with Windows XP Mode in Windows 7 for quite some time, but only recently got around to accomplishing that objective. I now have Windows XP Mode up and running on my Windows 7 system and am truly amazed by the way that it works. It really is a very nice piece of work that should help alleviate the types of application compatibility issues that prevented Vista from gaining a strong foothold in the enterprise. Now, companies that rely on applications designed to run in Windows XP, will be able to move up to Windows 7 and still use their old applications.

As I began my initial exploration into what I would need to be able to run Windows XP Mode in Windows 7, I found myself stymied by apprehension, confusion, and misinformation related to the hardware requirements, as well as the lack of readily available instructions on how to get started. As you may know, there are a plethora of articles on the Internet decrying Intel's lack of support for virtualization technology in many of its CPU chips. This fact alone paints a daunting picture and thus fed my anxiety. Then there is the generalized notion that hardware-based virtualization is something that needs to be enabled in the BIOS before you can take advantage of it.

In this edition of the Windows Vista and Windows 7 Report, I'll help you cut through all the hype surrounding the hardware requirements for running Windows XP Mode in Windows 7 by describing the procedures that I went through to determine if my hardware would support Windows XP Mode. In future articles, I'll explain the Windows XP Mode installation procedure and show you in more detail the benefits of running Windows XP Mode in Windows 7.

This blog post is also available in the PDF format in a free TechRepublic Download.

My hardware exploration

While I am successfully running Windows XP Mode on my Windows 7 system, the road was fraught with trials and tribulations. I began my hardware exploration on the Microsoft Windows Virtual PC site, which outlines the system requirements for Windows Virtual PC as follows:

  • Hardware Virtualization Technology enabled
  • 1GHz 32-bit / 64-bit processor required
  • Memory (RAM) 1.25GB required, 2GB memory recommended
  • Recommended 15GB hard disk space per virtual Windows environment

My test system for this project started out as a bare-bones MSI box with an AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ CPU and 1GB of RAM. So, the first thing that I did was install another GB of RAM. My processor was definitely fast enough and I had plenty of disk space. As such the next question was whether my AMD processor included AMD-V, which is the name of AMD's hardware virtualization technology.

When I originally built this system in December of 2006, hardware virtualization technology wasn't much of a blip on the radar, so I wasn't sure.

According to AMD:

"All CPUs AMD is currently shipping, except Sempron, include AMD-V and therefore support XP mode."

In relation to its older CPUs, AMD stated:

"With the exceptions of Sempron-branded processors and Turion K8 Rev E processors, all notebook processors shipped by AMD include AMD-V and therefore support Windows 7 XP mode. With the exceptions of Sempron-branded processors and pre-Rev F Athlon branded processors, all of the desktop processors shipped by AMD include AMD-V and therefore support Windows 7 in XP mode."

While it would have been better if AMD had provided a list of all the processors that provided AMD-V support, based on this information, I was pretty confident that my AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ CPU supported AMD-V.

Assuming that I would have to enable it, I went into the system setup to look for a setting in the BIOS related to AMD-V but didn't find anything. However, I did notice that the BIOS was dated 10/19/2006. So, thinking that access to an AMD-V setting would be provided in a newer BIOS version, I took a trip to the MSI site and used the Live Update Online service to download a BIOS update. After flashing my BIOS, the new version date moved up to 2/23/2009, but there was still no setting related to AMD-V.

After a bit of searching on the AMD site, I found, downloaded, and installed the AMD CPUInfo utility. While it sort of provided me with the confirmation that my AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ CPU supported AMD-V, the information was conflicting. To begin with, instead of identifying the hardware virtualization technology as AMD-V, the CPUInfo utility identified it as Secure Virtual Mode, as shown in Figure A. Furthermore, while it verified that that the CPU supported Secure Virtual Mode, it also indicated that Secure Virtual Mode was not enabled and as such, not available -- more confusion.

Figure A

The AMD CPUInfo utility provided conflicting information.

However, Googling Secure Virtual Mode turned up a link to a January 2008 blog entry by John Howard who is a Senior Program Manager on the Hyper-V team, Windows Core Operating System Division. In this blog, John states:

"...On Intel platforms, you can normally turn VT on and off in the BIOS, whereas on AMD platforms, AMD-V is on all the time (at least I have not come across a BIOS which contains an option to enable/disable AMD-V)."

With this bit of wisdom in mind, I decided to just go ahead and install the beta version of Windows Virtual PC utility. It installed without a hitch. So I proceeded to install the beta version of Windows XP Mode and it too installed without a hitch.

Curious, I then ran the AMD CPUInfo utility again and discovered that while Windows Virtual PC is running, the Secure Virtual Mode is listed as enabled, as shown in Figure B. However, as soon as you close Windows Virtual PC, the Secure Virtual Mode is listed as not enabled. As such, it seems that AMD-V is designed to recognize when it is needed and will automatically enable itself.

Figure B

When Windows Virtual PC is running, the Secure Virtual Mode is listed as enabled.

Intel CPUs

When it comes to using Windows XP Mode in Windows 7 on a system powered by an Intel CPU, I can't offer any firsthand experience with Intel VT at this time. I don't currently have an Intel system and haven't used one in quite some time. I'll see what I can come up with though.

However, according to articles, such as Ed Bott's recent Microsoft Report blog How many Intel CPUs will fail the XP Mode test in Windows 7?, over on ZDNet, there are a lot of Intel CPUs that do not provide hardware virtualization technology support. You can find out if your Intel CPU supports Intel VT by using the online Processor Spec Finder or by reviewing the lists on Ed's blog.

What's your take?

Are you experimenting with Windows XP Mode in Windows 7? If so, what type of CPU do you have Intel or AMD? What was your experience with your hardware? As always, if you have comments or information to share about this topic, please take a moment to drop by the TechRepublic Community Forums and let us hear from you.

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About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

53 comments
Jacky Howe
Jacky Howe

I'm a bit dissapointed that if your Motherboard doesn't support Hardware Virtualization not only can't you install it, you cant run Virtual PC 2007 either.

enochsvision
enochsvision

There is an easier way to determine if your CPU is capable of XP Mode. Download Securable from security Guru Steve Gibson's site. It needs no installation. Run this tiny app and have your answer in five seconds. http://www.grc.com/securable.htm

dhamilt01
dhamilt01

Since Microsoft is ending XP support soon, will Microsoft support the version of XP to be used in Windows 7? If not, what's the point? If they will, can you use any updates/patches for the Windows 7 version of XP on the original XP that is no longer supported?

reisen55
reisen55

Just because Micro$oft releases something new does us no good reason to trash a successful product. I am sticking with Windows XP until Windows Seven (of 9) is a road tested, proven product. That means six months or more and field results come in. Hey, be my guest to screw up your clients computers.

paragdhungana
paragdhungana

my bios says i don't have intel VT, but i could install the virtual xp mode on my windows 7

john3347
john3347

It does appear, after perusing the specs, that Windows 7 will run quite satisfactorily on a $50 processor. XP will run on even less than that, but to run virtual XP requires A MINIMUM of a $100 processor. Now, isn't that progress? We all know that the $100 processor is then going to add $300 to the price of the equipment to run virtual XP. Nice move Microsoft.

MPG187
MPG187

So let me get this straight, you need fancy hardware to run Windows XP mode, so you need better hardware that to actually run XP? If a PC has good enough hardware to run Windows 7 then it is sad if it can't run XP mode. What about 9x mode? I have some old games I wanna play!

gjjacob
gjjacob

I di hope Windows 7 will work with Windows XP, I am runing Windows Vista now, (if not I will move to Mac)

jaydpiii
jaydpiii

I can NOT get to the MSI site. It keeps timing out? What's up with that? (www.msi.com)

pgit
pgit

Excellent info, thanks for digging in and ferreting this out. Ironic, isn't it, that intel is the one not offering the broadest support. Makes me glad I've mostly recommended AMD based hardware...

Dogcatcher
Dogcatcher

To those who say XP Mode with Windows 7 is not needed when you have the real XP at hand, I say you're mostly correct. At least for right now. But this computer technology moves forward at a quick-march, and there will come a time when Win7 will connect to devices that XP cannot. In the meantime, XP Mode may help people who purchase new computers with Win7 pre-installed -- if they were lucky or smart enough to get a CPU with virtualization capability. But I sense there may be something even bigger going on here. Today's virtualization may be merely the primative steps in a fundamental change in our computers. To me it seems likely that in the near future the entire base operating system environment will be placed on a chip of our choice that we plug in. On top of that, we'll add the desktop interface of our choice, as we now do in Linux, and then run applications in their own protected environments.

Dogcatcher
Dogcatcher

Thank you for the article on virtualization with AMD processors. I have an older laptop with a Turion 64 x2. When I looked in the BIOS for a virtualization setting and found none, I had come to the wrong conclusion regarding the availability of that technology. The laptop does indeed have the capability and runs XP Mode just fine, albeit slower than my newer systems do. Nevertheless, it is adquate for testing and demonstrating the capability. Thank you also for the link to the AMD CPUInfo application, and the tip that the element of interest was called "Secure Virtual Mode". I was unable to find the utility without your link. Dunno why AMD keeps this useful tool so well hidden.

Veneco_2008
Veneco_2008

Well obviously is about applications that run under XP. It is like a backward compatibility issue; once the transition is done. Bye bye XP! I hope! ; )

frank_s
frank_s

For me it was no trouble at all to install XP mode and use it to run an old MS-DOS program that I still use. It's considerably simpler and faster than using a dual boot setup, which is what I was doing previous to installing XP Mode. The two computers I use most often are both less than a year old with Intel processors. It was easy enough to enable VT in the BIOS and then install Virtual PC and XP Mode. FWIW one system is running Window 7 32 bit and the other 64 bit and both work fine in XP Mode.

mikeshears
mikeshears

Why go through all this when we already have XP? My current hardware already supports XP so why upgrade? And does this mean a whole new set of apps for win 7?

douglasgross
douglasgross

Yes, this is all fine, and anything is better than Vista, but you can also run the Virtual PC on Vista and install Windows XP can't you? I have heard two sides to the story. That with Vista software vendors had plenty of time to update their programs for Vista compatibility, and the flip side, that it is Microsoft's job to eliminate compatibility issues. My opinion is that if Microsoft wants to continue charging the big bucks for its operating system, it is their job. If I can't run Windows 7 without running the Virtual PC, why continue running Microsoft-based software at all? Why not go with Linux?

dinamic
dinamic

Hello guys. I'm on the IT sector from about ten years now. Currently I have one machine running Intel Centrino2 (Merom with Santa Rosa) T7250 powered by Windows 7 beta and one AMD Athlon64 X2 5200+. I have not experimented, yet, with the so-called "Windows XP mode". It sounds to me like you are just using plain virtualization, which, by my opinion, has nothing in common with having a different mode of your operating system. It's like if I have installed VirtualBox on my Gentoo linux with Windows XP on it and my processor do have virtualization support, so would it be right to say that I have enabled the 'Windows XP mode' of my Linux? I don't think so.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Are you experimenting with Windows XP Mode in Windows 7? If so, what type of CPU do you have Intel or AMD? What was your experience with your hardware?

lineone2
lineone2

Well that was easy! core 2 duo on gigabyte dual bios motherboard - enabled and locked on apparently!

john3347
john3347

"Since Microsoft is ending XP support soon" Where does this come from that Microsoft is ending "support" for XP soon? They have announced support until - what is it? - 2012 or 2014, and will likely extend it beyond that. Security updates will continue well past dropping of mainstream support. My Goodness! I'm still getting security updates for Windows 2000. 2000 is just now becoming unusable for a certain segment of users and not even yet unserviceable for the rest of us. You will have to use both hands and maybe take off a shoe or two to count the usable years left in XP's lifetime. Don't be so hasty to bid XP goodby.

darrylhadfield
darrylhadfield

MicroShaft's new goodies are slick - yes. I think it's an elementary question, too, as to why they're really turfing support for XP Pro.. I have it on several machines (I've got 6, for chrissake!) and it'll STAY that way! I do disagree on the 6 mths bit, though - Microsoft pulled a slick trick when they released the Win7 Beta to public consumption.. look at what it did with XPM vs. not? Paying attention to their customers isn't entirely foreign to Microsoft - they just insist on pushing their own agenda over what that of their customers. Personally, I'd like to see MS release free installation keys for any OS more than two generations old.. maintain the latest fixes (service packs and critical hotfixes) on a CD that organzations can buy at-cost.. and let the Haves support the new OS, while the have-nots use older gear. That sort of pushes them to ensure real value-add in the new OS', wouldn't you think?

JCitizen
JCitizen

Just wondering how that relates to the story? Not that I blame you; IE 8 has a crossscripting vulnerability that is not being addressed by Microsoft, in XP/Vista; and this is the longest I've seen such listed by Secunia. I was just getting to like Vista x64 and IE8, too! Now I'm madder than hell! Not that Mac's don't have vulnerabilities too, just that it makes a big difference on a Windows machine. I usually throw any application away that refuses to close the gap. Looks like I'm going to FireFox with NoScript after all. Wonder if Macs support x64 bit cable compliant systems? I've never seen that listed in the OEM sites premium cable content; so far they are the only ones being allowed to build most of those machines.

JCitizen
JCitizen

In IE8 64bit without even having to click "compatibility mode". Must be something clogging you're connection. Maybe you need to dump your temp files; I use CCleaner. I can't get very far, for very long without it.

dang
dang

Win XP works perfectly. Developers love it. Users love it. Business love it.... If MS wants us to use a new windows to catch on, they have to learn what made XP so good. In my opinion, they could have easily improved XP and launched XP Lite. Sold it for $50 (like normal software) and it would have been a HUGE success... A bloated OS is NOT what we want.... We want a lean mean operating machine. Buying the new mac seems more inviting every day.....

leelord
leelord

I'm currently running Vista Premium and just per-ordered Windows 7 Premium. I notice that Microsoft only offers the XP Mode in their professional, Ultimate and Enterprise versions. Once I upgrade to Windows7 will I be able to download and manually install Virtual PC and XP mode and have it work in my Premium version? Yes my AMD BIOS supports it. Thank you!

TNT
TNT

I agree with rsotoz in that I can't wait to get away from XP. I've been on Vista for almost 2 years now and would never go back. I am looking forward to summer 2010 when, assuming Microsoft releases 7 this fall, my entirely XP workplace will be upgrading to Win7. Why am I looking forward to it? Because Win7 is significantly better than XP. How is it better? Couple Vista or Win7 with a Server 2008 based network and you experience faster network speeds. XP does not support the new networking "magic" in Server 2008 and cannot exploit its benefits. This is just one real world improvement that will effect every user on your network. Stability is another factor. While XP is more stable today than when first released, I'll put my Vista box up against any XP box any day of the week. XP with SP2 never performed as reliably or as quickly as Vista does on the same hardware. But we've drifted far from the purpose of this thread. I found out my processor does support Intel VT and I plan to look at it tonight to see about enabling it (if its not already) and seeing what I need to do to take advantage of XP mode when 7 is released. With all the talk about the vast number of Intel chips that do not support VT, I was surprised to see my old Pentium D does. I plan to see if some of my companies legacy apps will run properly in a virtualized desktop environment. It may buy my team more time to develop and role out the old software's replacement. I'll report back any findings that may be helpful to others.

pgit
pgit

I have one client that's asked me to demonstrate Linux hosts running XP in a vbox. The only problem is the dang windows licensing. Did you know a standard Dell OEM license does not allow you to install the XP in a vbox on the SAME HARDWARE? "genuine advantage" flags it as different, ergo unauthorized hardware. I went round and round with Dell for a couple hours on this. The "help" didn't have a clue what I was talking about.

mist27
mist27

I have a Compaq Laptop with Vista installed. I removed it and loaded XP, Impossible to get all the drivers working,Re loaded Vista all drivers working. Loaded Virtual Box Installed XP, Walla All Drivers Working. So I really dont see Why we need Win7 I have tried it and it will be very hard for any Business to justify the expense of a change.

pgit
pgit

That this is seamless? Rather than a vanilla vbox, this fully integrates with the host system, the article talked about cut/paste between guest and host. That doesn't sound like any old vbox. It's a fine tuned vbox with a specific purpose. I plan on making good use of this. Everyone I service has antique proprietary software they simply refuse to let go of. But we can't have win2k and XP boxes accessing the internet forever into the future.

Eduardo Malbert
Eduardo Malbert

It?s very interesting this new option in Windows 7, especially in the corporate world. But there are other options already available for the common or power user. We?ll need an important difference in performance in Windows Virtual PC to choose the Microsoft way... :)

andrejakostic
andrejakostic

I have an Acer notebook with an Intel processor which supports virtualization, but it is disabled in BIOS and as far as I can see, Acer isn't interested in enabling it. To make the matter even more confusing, some of their notebooks do have virtualization enabled and some do not. And there is no easy way for user to see which do have it enabled and which don't. Also, I haven't been able to find any utility which would show me if VT is enabled or disabled in BIOS.

8string
8string

While I just encountered the frustrations of trying to get this to work, there are some other issues as well. There *appears* to be no "support" for server OS's, but after emailing some friends, it appears that people are able to run Server 2008 under this. You would never know that from the MS site, which assumes you will run HyperV to do this. I would much rather continue to use my desktop for Win7 for 'daily' activities, and then run various server versions for test on it, rather than start with Server & VM into W7. And being forced to *upgrade* to Ultimate simply to run a VM is really agravating. Why not just charge for VPC? It seems that it would just make sense to spend the $200 for VMWare rather than W7Ult?

reisen55
reisen55

Why not Windows 7 in XP Mode? All the more reason to ignore yet another irrelevant operating system upgrade from the company that brought you Vista. I tried release candidate 1, and upon removal back to XP through GHOST it detonated one entire 500gb partition along the way. Beautiful product indeed. And we have Microsoft Office 2010 around the corner too as if the world has not upgraded totally to Office 2007 from 2003 or 2002 (the latter the BEST one they ever released).

leelord
leelord

Hey mark, I haven't experimented YET. I did order Windows 7 Premium instead of Pro because in doing the "Windows Upgrade Advisor" all my Vista hardware/software is compatible with 7 except for my card reader. I'm told, over all, if XP/Vista supports your hardware/software, 7 will as well. Because of that I decided to order win 7 Premium. With XP Mode, first you need Windows 7 Pro as Windows 7 Premium doesn't support XP Mode. To determine is your computer is compatible you need to download and run the CPU AMD "CPUInfo utility"(assuming you have an AMD Processor) and check if you have "Virtual Mode Support" in the resulting readout. If so XP Mode will work on your box. If you have an Intel Processor here's some information: http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=946 I hope this helped some. Lee

jr.golden300
jr.golden300

I am experimenting with Windows XP Mode and I have an Intel i7 920 Nehalem. For me, set up was sooo easy, I was truly amazed. It seems many here are IT Pros, so I wanted to give my take as that employee that will be using the machine that you may or may not put 7 on. Basically, if gives me the choice of operating on XP or 7 - Or Both, which is great! Why does it seems this never comes up? Its always pick 7 or pick XP, I think we may be missing Microsoft's point, "Hey, Let your employee pick whatever they want". or "Oh, 7 isn't working on your old machine? Here, just double click on the XP Mode Icon your IT professional has put on your desktop". Who can argue with more options??? Assuming your companies hardware can support virtualization... On a personal (at home) side of things I will now be able to experiment with Malware as I get deeper into my training in a virtual environment watching malware work with a simple click of a button AND IT COMES WITH 7! Also, my girlfriend is not familiar with 7, so now she just has to double click to open up the virtual machine, and there is trusty ole' XP. I like it, A LOT! Sorry if my words seem unconventional, but that is my take as a Non-IT Pro... Thanks, J.R.

leelord
leelord

I'm currently running Vista Premium and just per-ordered Windows 7 Premium. I notice that Microsoft only offers the XP Mode in their professional, Ultimate and Enterprise versions. Once I upgrade to Windows7 will I be able to download and manually install Virtual PC and XP mode and have it work in my Premium version? Yes my AMD BIOS supports it. Thank you!

apete
apete

I say Dual, but I actually Quad-boot. I have Vista32 Ultimate as the default, and Vista64 Ultimate, Win7RC Ultimate, and XP Pro as menu options. I just built a new PC 4 weeks ago and installed an Intel Core2 Quad Q8300. Now I discover that it does not support VT. I have no intention of upgrading again just for a Virtual XP machine where I have to jump through hoops by changing CPU's, trying to figure out how to turn VT on, etc., etc. I already have a REAL one, and it doesn't have to share memory, video, or any other resources with anything else. It gets the full 4 gigs (well, 3) of my RAM and the full attention of my graphics card. I am slowly weaning myself off XP by continuously installing Vista replacements of my XP Apps, and uninstalling the XP versions. I also test these new apps on Vista64 and Win7 for compatibility. I fully intend to make Win7 my default OS as soon as it is released for sale. Both my work machine and my home machine, are set up this way. I can remote connect from either end, and by executing batch files, I can change the default OS and reboot the machine, then reconnect remotely into the new OS. When I find that I no longer, or rarely, boot into XP Pro, I will wipe the partition and use it for storage.

SoylentGreen
SoylentGreen

I personally have some software, older GPS mapping, that will only work on XP. I don't want to spend the $$$ on an update for something I use maybe once a year to put maps onto my GPS. It looks alot like Server 2008 TS RemoteApp.

Realvdude
Realvdude

Why virtual XP mode? It's a transparent (nearly) virtual machine; no instructing end users on running a VM. With Win7 you're licensed for a single XP SP3 VM. No need to worry about OEM license contraints on the XP you used for your VM. The downside is that it's only available for Win7 Pro and up.

RealAusTech
RealAusTech

in using XP mode under Win7. Once the support for XP runs out, I will simply use a PC with no Internet connectivity to run any applications that are needed, until they get replaced by something newer, which usually happens with hardware upgrades or replacements. Virtualization may be the mode of week after next, but I prefer to dual or multi-boot. From my POV its easier to reboot, than to start up a virtual machine.

JCitizen
JCitizen

but contrary to MS's bottom line - however, why not sell yearly support packages for reasonable fees, like the AV companies do? Say like 40 dollars for a year, or maybe 120 for five? Who knows?

darrylhadfield
darrylhadfield

I am a senior consultant with a major computing firm - whose name I don't specify, for reasons well and good - and my current portfolio of clients includes two major banks (both of which are household names), a printer manufacturer, two large (i.e. Fortune 500) manufacturing organizations, and a myriad of smaller enterprises. Every single IT department head within every single client I've been at indicates at least marginal interest in Windows 7. Several are already well down the path towards integration, having skipped Vista entirely, and moving right to Win7. You're correct that a bloated OS is something no-one wants. Win7, however, isn't exactly what I'd call bloated. Trimmed down, it's a speed demon on my netbook - blows the doors off my work notebook - a dual-core 2.2ghz with 4gb of RAM.

DWalker88001
DWalker88001

Yep, it does appear to be different hardware. This is something that the OEM license didn't anticipate. The OEM license if restricted to the same "hardware" and it's true that a virtual box has different virtualized "hardware". The OEM license check should be fixed, in my opinion. Actually, the retail license check might also think you're on a new box when you're using a virtual machine. I don't know how that's handled.

kellyswanson
kellyswanson

Rebooting is a thing of the past. Virtuls boot in seconds 5-10. DOuble clicking on an desktop package shortcut couldn't be easier. The energy and space savings of it are incredible. I used to have 5 desktops for various testings and now I have one nice big workstation that runs them all.

dareeves
dareeves

I agree with you there. Upgrade my OS just to run XP mode, forget it, I'm just sticking with XP Pro and save all the hassles and more BS spin from M$

syhprum1
syhprum1

I have setup Virtual XP on my AMD Phenom 8450 trple core computer with 4Gb memory but it was not really a success, the object was to run WxToImg satellite software that is a problem in Win 7. To be on the safe side I setup antivirus software within XP but the main problem was to get the audio signal in from the satellite receiver the sound card was not recognized until I loaded in a "sound blaster" driver and then the received pictures had phasing errors every 30 seconds or so. It is much easier to boot up a native XP system!.

mike_patburgess
mike_patburgess

I liked this statement about MS getting bored, but when are you people going to bite the bullet and get an operating systme CORE that does not change with anyones whim? Speak to MS with your IT budget and move into UNIX or LINUX to run your mission critical applications and leave MS to gaming or other non-critical stuff. I've just received an update message from MS to update my IE to version 8.0... Ahhhh no. not on my watch until I know that this thing is widely used and stable. Last time when I updated from IE6 to 7, nothing worked and I tried Firefox and what a joke that was.. UNIX or Linux people ... get used to it and you'll never look back.. or maybe you will just to think that you should have done the move sooner.

junk
junk

You guys miss the point completely. Some of us work in small shops with in-house apps that only run on XP. We don't have the manpower to convert our software every time Microsoft gets bored and shifts the ground under our feet. Unfortunately, it's a mess a lot of us have inherited and are stuck with. The XP virtual mode in Windows 7 gives a lot more flexability running our software and integrating it with newer software and the (few) advantages of Windows 7. I have nice new Win 7 apps and old XP apps running alongside each other, interacting normally (cutting/pasting/sharing files/etc.) and generally getting along. NOW, on the topic of Bios etc... I work in the field a lot and have Win 7 installed on my Toshiba Notebook with a Centrino T7200 which DOES support virtualization. It was, however, turned off in the Bios and Toshiba was no help at all getting it activated. None of the literature with the computer or on their support site showed how to even bring up the Bios settings. They provide a 'hardware config' utility for Windows which sets up the Bios, but it did not include Virtual mode settings. The normal Bios hot keys on startup did not work (Del, Esc, F12, etc.). They only document hotkeys for system recovery and boot device. After a lot of pounding forums I figured out that hitting F1 multiple times did the trick (once didn't work!) and I got it turned on. After that all went smoothly. On the bright side, the Virtual XP does work well and generally shares clipboard, files, ports and devices with its host. It does this much better than the old Vista version of Virtual PC. On the down side, the file sharing needs some work and can be occationally slow accessing because it runs through the Windows Networking interface. More importantly, where Windows 7 has been bulletproof compared to the horror that is Vista, having multiple virtual XP apps running alongside Win 7 apps has caused some freezups and other problems more reminiscent of Win 95. Hope this helps.

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