Microsoft

Fact sheet: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (Preview)

Microsoft is preparing to update Windows to version 8.1 and is offering us the chance to preview the changes before it is officially released.

This fact sheet will be continually updated with the latest details as we learn more about Windows 8.1 Preview. You can check back anytime and refresh this article to get the latest updates.

Updated information

Microsoft has announced that Windows 8.1 will be released as free update on the Windows Store to all Windows 8 and Windows RT users on October 18, 2013.

After digging its heels in initially, Microsoft relented and on September 10, 2013, the company made Windows 8.1 RTM available for MSDN and TechNet subscribers and for Volume License customers.

What we know

  • Prevalent caveat: Microsoft makes a point of offering this warning before you install Windows 8.1: This preview is mainly for experienced PC users, so if you're not sure whether it’s right for you, read the FAQ.
  • Noteworthy caveat: You are required to have a personal Windows Live account or the enterprise equivalent in order to finish the installation.
  • Availability: You can download and install the Windows 8.1 Preview from the Windows Store for free. There is also a Windows 8.1 Preview for the Enterprise available for download.
  • Search integration: Windows 8.1 features a single search feature that will return results for a search from your computer, your applications, and the web.
  • Updated basic apps: The standard Windows 8 apps are updated and retooled in 8.1, including the mail, photo, people, and calendar.
  • Cloud storage: SkyDrive is the default location for saving documents as opposed to the C: drive, for example.
  • Internet Explorer upgrade: With Windows 8.1 you get the updated Internet Explorer 11.
  • Apps: One of the new apps included with 8.1 is Fresh Paint, an updated and modern interface version of the venerable Paint program.
  • Search improvements: Besides integrated search, Windows 8.1 also includes several new Bing apps, such as Bing Sports, Bing Travel, and Bing Health & Fitness.
  • Windows Store: The Windows Store has been redesigned to be simpler to use and to provide you with a better shopping experience. Apps should be easier to discover with 8.1.
  • Compatibility: Windows 8.1 is completely compatible with all Windows 7 apps, including Office 365.
  • Adaptable windows: In Windows 8.1, you can have up to four apps on the screen at the same time and you can size and arrange those windows anyway you choose.
  • Multi-monitor support: Windows 8.1 has a more coherent approach to support for multiple monitors, whether operating in the modern interface or on the traditional desktop.
  • Across devices: Personal settings for desktop backgrounds, favorites, documents etc. can synchronize across various Windows 8.1 devices.
  • Social connections: Windows 8.1 Preview expands on the concepts of social connections by integrating social features into Outlook, the Mail app, the People app, and Skype.
  • BYOD: Coupling 8.1 Preview with Windows Server allows more flexibility when managing personal devices in the enterprise.
  • Security: Enterprise-grade security is available through enhanced access control, data protection, and encryption.
  • Connectivity: Windows 8.1 Preview includes several improvements to connectivity, such as enhanced mobile broadband functionality, NFC based tap to pair with enterprise printers, and native Miracast wireless display capabilities.
  • Annoyances: Many of the complaints about Windows 8 revolve around what I would classify as simply annoying. Windows 8.1 Preview fixes a few of these:
    • Shutdown/Restart/Sleep: A user can now Shutdown, Restart, or put a PC in Sleep mode from the Desktop by right-clicking the Windows button (where the old Start Button used to be) and navigating to the appropriate menu item. Total number of clicks required for the procedure - two.
    • All Apps: Users can see all the available apps by clicking the arrow on the Start Screen. (To see the apps in Windows 8 you had to right-click on an empty part of the Start Screen.)

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

66 comments
al5555
al5555

don't use Linux trust me you will get bored of it I have and love windows8.1  the only down side to it is the 8.1 version has some issues when it comes to installing an antivirus is not compatible with most of them is also kind of expensive to me ithink isn like 280 bucks now,i got it for 60 when it first came out Microsoft needs to consider lowering down the price,besides if you have to pay like 200 dollars for every upgrade keeping your pc up to date can get expensive

lenb
lenb

I upgraded to Windows 8.  So far, it seems to be a polished up Windows 7 with a fancy screen saver.  I don't feel I got my money's worth.  It looks like 8.1 will be just a big vacuum to pull everyone into Mama Microsoft.  Amazing.

mark.stewart
mark.stewart

RE annoyances / all apps you overlooked my favorite there. Which is, instead of Win80 right-click corner squeeze to get at those essential system tools, Win81 simply click on the taskbar Windows icon... RE Continuing annoyance, Win81 insists on forcing All Apps onto a separate screen from Start. SERIOUSLY PEOPLE! 99% of us are not in Kindergarten any more, and those clunky tiles look and feel extremely stupid. We would all rather see a default option for text lists that occupy much less screen real estate. Start "favorites" should list right beside All Apps "tagged applications". Also we would all appreciate a MISSING see-through integration with our ACTIVE DESKTOP, not the lame Win81  peek at a desktop graphic. When Microsoft finally gets that original concept working... THEN we all sure hope we get back those Win7 see-through Windows borders with the sexy, soft round corners. HARD TIMES FOLKS! Let's hope Microsoft can pull it all back together.

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

Still a lame OS, I have a feeling Windows 7 will be around for another 10 to 11 years sort of like XP was...

Mr. Tinker
Mr. Tinker

I have to say this, it should some what clear up the thoughts of W8's supporters that we don't like the interface because of aesthetics. What is not being said - is related to the aesthetics:
As a heavy business user, and most people using Windows products are, we read and respond to words much faster than pict-o-grams or pictures. The start of the "dislike" was when the Office team decided that by default we no longer needed to have the abilities to print (a default) via a once recognizable word that was attached to a small icon. (very little waste of the desktop space.) Instead, it was replaced with a huge ribbon, offering very little business usable functionality by default, and further obscured those most used default functions. How and when someone at their golden desk decided that we no longer used those most important functions was and still is beyond my comprehension. Now to W8... I have always maintained a clean and clear desktop - NO ICONS, and a Picture(s) that are soothing to look at. No I don't care for Metro - too cluttered and uses too much of the space I paid for. MS is attempting to draw the younger "social" crowd, I get that... but forcing anything "ritualistically" social down our throats is outright unpalatable. Telling us that we cannot complete the registration without an email account to "their" service (can you say apple???) further enhances the distaste. Sorry Apple-Fanz... but this is one of those reasons why Apple hasn't ruled the workplace, and Microsoft is repeating the same behavior thinking they can make it work. The backlash is because of the lack of focus on what made Windows (the O/S) useful and in demand in the first place. I started out from a Mainframe world, and see the "cloud" as a way of going back to it. However, most of us feel that doing it with any cloud service provides no better of a way of storing one's personal things with a safety/comfort level that is any better than keeping it on our own personal drive(s) - or personal network storage devices. In other words, taking away the control we once had over our systems along with the basic defaults that we have to scour around for on how to change back, is something most of us, are now just plain disgusted over. (How many hours do I have to spend scouring tips online to make MY SYSTEM usable again in MY NETWORK, not the Internet?)

gdkay
gdkay

Even in WIn8.0, using Office 2013, you can change default save location for Office to your C drive or wherever else you want it to save docs. If you don't want your live account "living" all the time, change your account settings to tell it to do so-- disconnect Live account and default to network account.

CAVEAT: These suggestions are available on a corporate network basis. I haven't begun to use Win8 at home yet. It's annoying, but no different from Apple's preferred mode of operation (sealed biosphere) and it primes everyone for future of renting software on cloud instead of installing it. Microsoft is evolving but so far the business world isn't.

MINI RANT: Biggest problem is Microsoft's *total lack* of communication or desire to reveal their 5 year plan and how we can all prepare for the upcoming changes. They spend so much time and money telling us that the Surface will save us from all evil that they forget millions of us have to use their stuff on laptops at work.

PhilippeV
PhilippeV

Cloud storage: SkyDrive is the default location for saving documents as opposed to the C: drive, for example."

This just demonstrates that Microsoft only focused on making Windows 8(.1) for smartphone and tablets used in mobility, where storage space is small.

Byt why such exclusive use of Skydrive when people will want to choose their own cloud storage (including private clouds on local networks which are increasingly connectable and reachable from anywhere on the net). Microsoft clouds are limited in size as well as in terms of speed, even if they are highly secured and kept really private.

But Skydrive does not offer a good protection against accidental public shares, and then it exposes data to immedaite deletion (meaning previous personal data losses and breaches in privacy).

We all need better management of online user profiles, separation of security realms, better access control (including the possibily to revoke other rights at any time, even in the copies of data they could have been usable to get).

And we can't trust Microsoft (or ny other single provider) to be the only one providing the ultimate security and trust. We need the choice between independant providers at all times an for indepandant domains of applications (never restart something like Facebook in a OS where your data is completely out of control).

Microsoft should better work on making applications available and installed on your desktop, and using local storage (not the cloud) to be remotely accessible from other small touche devices. But what is really needed for mobility is the management of data synchronization for use when you are offline and the remote location is not accessible.

Modern applications should offer multiple displays (with adapted views), multiple input devices, and should transparently work in a virtual personal network where the cloud is not the only option but just an optional support service. The OS should be user-centric rather than host-centric. And each user should have as many profiles as needed, isolated in sanfboxes, for each external service provider or installed software (the software should also be scalable to run transparently on local hosts, or remote hosts, or on application servers).

In fact the OS itself should become completely invisible. What you need is just an environment that looks and behaves like a web service, except that you could be able to create your own personal webservices, and share an access part of it with people you want, orsplit this share into as many profiles you'll want, without.

But Windows lags far behind what mobile OSes are offering for their applications. We nee applications that can work together in dynamic views, with reflowable contents and personalisable display options.

Today, the OS is not the host. The OS is "the" network, but not the Microsoft network or necessarily the Internet, but the netork you configure yourself easily and separately for each kind of interaction or usage with soneone else's data or media, or wil

ajanelson
ajanelson

Yes, Windows 8 has its annoyances. I built myself a new gaming system recently and was debating sticking with 7 or going to 8. I decided to give 8 a try. At first i didn't like it. I was used to the 7 layout. I had to find everything again it it took me a long time to get to know it. However, I kinda like it now.

I work in IT so I enjoy learning new things and being up-to-date. I cannot see this being easliy deployed in an office. I can see it being a headache with it looking and behaving very different and having to teach everyone how to use it.

With XP support coming to an end companies are forced to upgrading to 7. I can't see 8 being widely used in an office environment anytime soon.

gigi98
gigi98

I bought an ASUS laptop i5 high-end to use as my primary home device and, of course it's loaded with Windows 8. I despise this OS. I have lived through all of Microsoft's OSs, and maybe I'm just an old cranky IT geizettee, but how do I get rid of 8? I installed Start8 which helps but the thought of all that bloatware and being conjoined with Microsoft and the NSA makes me sick. I still have an XP box, a 5 year old Sony w/Vista, a 3 year old HP w/7 and a brand new ASUS ruined with this cartoon-like UI. Does this new regime at Microsoft not know who has the buying power in the marketplace?? Is it possible to detach myself from this monster by creating a partition and loading Windows 7? Meantime, I'll keep using my RazrHD and the Kindle to do my computing until I can get rid of 8! LOL

henry
henry

What I want to know is does 8.1 have the W7 legacy backup feature put back because as far as I could see it was removed from the trial version of 8.1? I installed the trial ver 8.1 on an older laptop some 2 months ago and could not see it there. Or has 8.1 not been finished yet for the likes of us ordinary folks. I will certainly use the disconnect feature when loading 8.1 as someone suggests. Good one and thanks to you.

eaglewolf
eaglewolf

Part 1

1- "You are required to have a personal Windows Live account or the enterprise equivalent in order to finish the installation"   You should not be forced into a specific e-mail account in order to use a program.

2- "... a single search feature that will return results for a search from your computer, your applications, and the web."   If I want to search the web, then that's exactly what I want to search.  NOTHING else.  There are far better ways to search a file system than even the current 'search' option - if you know how to file things in the first place.   It's already bad enough with the Bing search that includes social media.

3- "SkyDrive is the default location for saving documents as opposed to the C: drive, for example."   Absolutely not - nothing I do can be stored on the Cloud.  By saying it's 'default,' there is the assumption that you really *can* save to your C:\ drive.  I'd hope that's true.

eaglewolf
eaglewolf

Part 2

4- "...you can have up to four apps on the screen at the same time and you can size and arrange those windows anyway you choose"   It says 'up to' .. which implies you can't go beyond that number.   And why restrict the Metro user?  

5- "...expands on the concepts of social connections by integrating social features into Outlook, the Mail app, the People app, and Skype"   I do NOT want 'social features' in Outlook (and does that include the Hotmail takeover?), mail, or Skype.  Social media doesn't rule my life and I don't want the senseless waste of resources - not to mention the content.

Microsoft will never listen.   They are joining the volitile consumer market where rapid change IS the game and their users will happily jump ship if somebody else comes out with something with more 'glitz.'   At some point, the PC manufacturers will catch on and offer a choice to the o/s. 

JJFitz
JJFitz

The last three comments showed a lot of hate for Windows 8. Most of it, in my opinion, is unfounded.

In response to some of your issues: 

@victracy17 , I have installed Win 8 and 8.1 on several pre-Windows 8 computers -from desktops to laptops to convertible tablets and have not experienced any instability issues. It sounds like you have just had bad luck. Did you run the compatibility tool before you installed it? Did you check for updated drivers for your hardware?

@dsimic If you are familiar with the Windows key on your keyboard which has been useful since Vista, you should be able to navigate Windows 8 with ease. You also brought up a very common myth regarding needing a touch screen. A touchscreen is ABSOLUTELY NOT required for Windows 8. My home computer is running on Windows 8 and I don't have a touchscreen. The mouse is still fully supported. In fact, it is much faster to use the scroll wheel on your mouse to scroll through tiles than it is to use your finger. It is also much easier to select tiles to reorganize your start screen than it is to use your finger.

Also, if you are familiar with Windows XP, Vista, or 7, the learning curve to use Windows 8 is very shallow. The folder system is almost exactly the same and the desktop screen is alive and well.

@carlsf The start button returned (mostly) with Windows 8. Clicking it opens the start screen where you can access all of your apps AND full featured programs. Right clicking it opens a list of the old Start Menu favorites: Shutdown, Control Panel, Search, Run, File Explorer, Programs and Features. Plus a lot more that weren't on the old button.  


victracy17
victracy17

installed win 8 and as of now I found it was and is a total waste of time, created more system instability than even vista which in my opinion was the worst window experience I had ever encountered before today , this will never be installed on any system I own or my small company owns in the future , biggest waste of time and effort by Microsoft ever

dsimic
dsimic

Win 8? Just got new comp for kids and decided to go with windows 8. THE BIGGEST piece of junk ever. My company will never go to win 8. If forced to move, we will probably move to linux. Learning curve for win 8 is much steeper then for any of linux desktops. My advice to anyone buying desktop: if you do not have touch screen avoid windows 8 at any cost.

carlsf
carlsf

SORRY Microsoft 8.1??? NOT an option for our business.

If we cannot get and use on install (NOT to purchase another desktop) the Start Button/Menu as in WIN7 then we will be using another O/S.

WIN8 is the most unproductive O/S ever, and in our business we make money being productive not spending hours learning a new O/S or trying ti find how I used to do tasks.

David Hill
David Hill

Crunchbang for me. Windows is a pain to use.

the_tech_mule
the_tech_mule

Is SkyDrive as the default location for documents true in the Pro and Enterprise versions of 8.1 as well? I know that I can probably redirect manually or via GPO but that's really problematic from a business perspective. As an example, my wife works for a small organization in the mental health field with no internal IT staff and mostly self-service IT support; this could easily cause them a world of hurt if they start storing mental health records in SkyDrive and aren't even aware of it. Of course, it could be said that's their responsibility to know where the files are going. I just hope the installer is making it quite clear that they are going to SkyDrive by default.

sonicsteve
sonicsteve

Venerable paint program? Venerable is the last word I would use to describe Windows Paint. Laughable perhaps, useless... definitely. Not venerable. 

Venerable;
Accorded a great deal of respect, esp. because of age, wisdom, or character: "a venerable statesman". 

It all hinges upon respect, then you loose me from there. Aged is perhaps the kindest thing that could be said of it.

Coss71
Coss71

Win8 on a table is just a big phone that doesn't make calls unless you use Skype.  I have a tablet with 8 on it and the more I use it, the more I dislike it.  I guess it's just part of MS stumbling block chain (Win ME, DOS 4.0 and a few others).  I will stick with Win7 until I'm forced out of it; and there will be a lot of kicking and screaming on my part.

Ronman1961
Ronman1961

I am happy with 7! Users just get comfortable with one OS and MS changes it. It sucks for the average user!!

Kenogami
Kenogami

I agree, Abbos. I bought a new Toshiba Laptop and decided to go with Win 8. It was a trial at first but I found the apps I needed to get back to the desk top and start button. All works fine now. I almost never go to Metro. Piece of junk. M.S. Outlook does not update itself from Hotmail. Messages will not stay on unless you are signed into something that M.S. took control of. Therefore you never get a message that you received an E-mail or someone is on messenger. Skype has many problems. The only thing right now about Win 8.1 is that everyone at M.S. has their head in the clouds, maybe too many drugs and out of touch with reality. They need to get back to the users not their own ideas.

abbos
abbos

Lol.. what an OS:

Adaptable windows: In Windows 8.1, you can have up to four apps on the screen at the same time and you can size and arrange those windows anyway you choose.

For my work I have at least 12 progs and windows open (6 of them nicely arranged, different sizes, on one monitor). So do most of of my collegues. 4????
Our company is not switching to Windows 8 soon. Neither am I.

It is clear that Windows 8 is not for the desktop environment. And cutting down on open windows and programs? Back to the middle ages...

@ Alfred Use Windows 7 and run XP in Virtualbox. Skip 8, that  version is not needed..:)

RCawdor
RCawdor

One of the other big features is the check box allowing the PC to boot straight to the desktop. This did not bother me to much in 8, but I realize it was cause of issue for others. 

Leonard Anukam
Leonard Anukam

I can not do with out my Windows. Windows 8 is great, will like the look and feel of 7 where it is easy to customize my desk top.

mldennis
mldennis

Is this different than the previous preview released weeks ago?

alfred
alfred

I bought Windows 8 solely for the purpose of getting continued use out of Windows XP which has programs I cannot run under Win 7 or 8. I don't want Bing. I don't use Outlook. I don't want Sky Drive. I don't have or want a Microsoft Account. I have a third party Start button on desktop which works well and makes Win 8 tolerable. What steps can I take to avoid Win 8.1?

cpa
cpa

A grand total of 4 windows open at one time?   I guess I should be grateful, it's up from 2.... this operating system may actually be usable in real business environments at some point....  


Jim Stout
Jim Stout

Once u use it for while it's pretty fast

Brian Knutson
Brian Knutson

I prepared for windows 8 by usb bootable copy of windows 7... Just sayin. Linux is amazing and free. If you new, try Ubuntu it's easy to start with.

al5555
al5555

@lenb that's kin of true but windows 8 is a little faster I have both 7 and 8  

mark.stewart
mark.stewart

Sorry, have to add that on my box, with my Windows account, Win 7 also made non-active open windows semi-transparent, so moving your active window aside, or simply clicking taskbar to turn all windows semi--transparent, we could all see exactly where and what was going on. Win81 does not come close to that USER-FRIENDLY interface. Yes, we all wonder why Microsoft dumped that amazing Win7 functionality. Well it all still there, under the covers. She just needs a mother load of tweaking. The ASTRONOMICALLY HUGE benefit of Win81 over Win7-80 is system resource management. Specifically, memory. Win7+ has the Administration tool to chart your memory use. Win7 never got more than 4 Gb out of my 32 Gb RAM pack. Win80 got up to 14Gb, but got hung up in a limited  500Mb swap cache. Win81 deploys 28 GB with a 4 Gb swap. Thing like Win81 installation time, 4 minutes. No more hardware conflicts either. Back to Win7 for sophisticated user interface, or GET THE JOB DONE FAST... Questions, anybody?

linkinpark187
linkinpark187

@Mr. Tinker  There are ways to make Windows 8 function much like previous versions of Windows, though.  If you haven't heard of it, look up ClassicShell.  You also DON'T have to input an email address.  When you're setting up your computer and you get to the point where it asks for an email address, look towards the bottom of the screen.  You'll see an option to "Use local account only".  It will then ask if your'e sure you want to do that, which of course you can say yes.  Personally I've thoroughly enjoyed the Windows 8 app interface, and while yes, I have to agree with you in terms of that interface being an annoyance for the business user, you must understand that the desktop is only a click (or Windows key + D) away.  It's time for everyone to get off the "I hate Windows 8" bandwagon and give it a genuine shot.

gamesb00k
gamesb00k

@gigi98Any thoughts of switching to an alternative OS - Linux Mint (http://www.linuxmint.com/about.php)  is one that can offer you real power while still being easy to use.  It may also run more comfortably on your older hardware, even if you are stuck with the Brave New Windows on your recent  machines.

PS What is a "geizettee'??  Google has no idea...

fixmypcmike
fixmypcmike

@gigi98 I share your pain. I panned it from the beginning and am slowly getting to like it. It does take some getting used to. You may want to try partitioning your Win 8 drive (if the system lets you) and install Win 7 on the new drive. I partitioned my drive and now have the option of booting to Win XP, Win 7 or Win 8. I haven't tried it yet on Win 8 pre-installed PCs yet, but see if that works for you. Good luck

PhilippeV
PhilippeV

@dsimic And if you use a touch screen, most probably you're already using Androit or iOS... Windows 8(.1) is in fact just Windows Phone ported to the Microsoft Surface tablets.
In fact you also need an OS for large displays, and large displays are definitely not mobile, and completely unusable with a touche interface (except if you have a remote control on your mobile device as an alternate input terminal, but do you need Windows for just displaying and using a remote terminal?)

Also is the finger on a touch device the best input tool for everyting? Most data in fact never comes from such input device.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

@sonicsteve I think you are being a little hard on Paint - it's free and comes with the OS and it does the very basics and it has been around a long time. 


That being said, the point is that the Paint that you dislike so much is upgraded with 8.1 - you may find yourself having more respect for it now.

joeyramone2
joeyramone2

@abbos There are a lot of hysterical Win8 bashing posts like this that are factually untrue. Windows 8 will run all your same 12 programs with them nicely arranged just like on Windows 7. It also adds better features with multiple monitors, better security and better filesystem resiliency from drive or power errors, etc etc.  You can run more than 4 apps at once too, but only can view up to 4 per screen. This is because "modern" apps are designed to bet tiny programs that work on tablets and TOUCH-centric devices.. This is suitable for just checking sports news and weather in a nice fullscreen reader mode or for killing time while on the go. For the immediate future, business users will likely have a need to stick with the traditional paradigm of desktop programs that require mouse and keyboard and maximum use of screen real estate. What Windows 8 does is merge the old paradigm with the new, essentially giving you your fun little ipad functionality on top of your desktop. The difference though is that Win 8 can display 4 apps at once whereas an ipad could only display one, cannot connect to printers or usb drives, etc.. Also when you move from one Win 8 computer to another your apps and settings can follow you, so you don't need to re-learn each tablet laptop or desktop. The downside that I see to Win 8 is there should have been some training videos included because much of the user frustration comes from the fact that some ways of doing some things have changed; not necessarily harder, sometimes easier, but perhaps "hidden" is the correct term, this was intentional to keep it a clean interface, but until you know how to do things you may "feel" like it can't do what you want. If you stay in Desktop mode, it is essentially no different than Windows 7 but simply adds more functionality and a bridge to the future.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

@abbos I should have been more clear (I'll edit the FAQ), that is 4 screens in the "modern interface." The desktop operates as it does in Windows 7.

joeyramone2
joeyramone2

@cpa To all the people considering Windows 8.1, it can run ANY number of simultaneous programs just like Windows 7 or Xp. Don't be confused by "APPS". Apps are basically little toy programs that you run on your smartphones and tablets, like weather, stocks, facebook, games. So yes, Windows 8 lets you run more than one app onscreen at the same time which is more than previous ipads could do. Business users will likely stay in the traditional Desktop mode which lets you run all your software as you can in prior versions of windows. The difference is that you can leave the office and have a tablet with your cute little apps on the same device; and since all your apps and settings can travel between your Windows 8 computers, you won't have to re-learn how to do something on your tablet vs your desktop or laptop etc. This is the future.

mark.stewart
mark.stewart

Tile concept? For the little kids in your life, thumbnails of lastopencurrent. Lol. Given Flickr-Facebook reception of new Win81 app updates, that concept could be a long, long, long time coming.

Mr. Tinker
Mr. Tinker

@linkinpark187Thank you for your input... I'd like to state that my real desktop has a pencil cup, stapler, tape dispenser,, and a coaster/warmer for my coffee cup... its never hidden by a "click away". I come in & sit down to my already available desktop.

"Dealing" with  (and I quote) "A Modern" desktop that actually reminds me (and my grand daughter too by the way) of cartooned cave drawings is not my idea of a modern interface that I'm supposed to plunk down big money for, to get a "Professional" (??) O/S with klugey methods to get any real business done with. NO ONE should have to jump through hoops. I've been with MS since Dos 2.0. I'm no stranger to getting around programmer's screw-ups. Forcing an Apple/Mac-like experience down our  throats is just too much for me to "bear".as a screw-up. You can accept it, you can even like it, I prefer to keep my social life and computer life separate, my business and play life separate. I tried it - and am just too damn tired to re-engineer an Apple clone. (jump through hoops to change so many bad-choice defaults to settings that make business sense. I wouldn't use those default settings in my home either.)

(Please do not take this an attack you sir! It is not. Its stating outright what peeves many of us beyond the simple annoyance factor.) 

linkinpark187
linkinpark187

@gamesb00k @gigi98 The only problem with switching to a Linux distro is that, so far as I know, there's no support for USB 3.0 and many new computers come with 3.0 standard, now.  I've tried running current versions of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and PinGuy on my desktop, none of which supports USB 3.0, and all crash before you can even get into a live interface.  Maybe I'm missing something, though...

davidlak
davidlak

First of all there all os' s and second of all you can have 10 inch tablet for win 8 that has the same os as "large displayed screens" (aka desktop windows) and thirdly there are large screen mobile displays

sonicsteve
sonicsteve

@Mark W. Kaelin @sonicsteve  

I haven't seen the paint that comes with with Windows 8. I know that the version that comes with Windows 7 isn't terribly capable, the version in XP was really a "why bother?". I say that because the other free options out there GIMP and Paint.net are what  would call venerable. MS Paint has none of the hallmarks of a true paint program.  I teach digital paint to Junior High students and it would be pointless to teach with MS paint. To this point MS paint could not be described as venerable, perhaps in the future if they actually spend some time on it. Anyone who spends any time at all using digital paint software doesn't give it a second look, therefore it isn't venerable.


sonicsteve
sonicsteve

@Mark W. Kaelin @sonicsteve  

I'm glad to hear it's still there. As much as  I think it's inadequate as a paint program the only thing worse would be no paint program. On that line of thought it seems like fresh paint isn't designed for the same purpose. Admins need a traditional paint program on a regular basis. Fresh paint looks cool and worthy of a try (or more) but it doesn't look like it can handle screenshots, and basic image manipulation.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

@sonicsteve @Mark W. Kaelin Paint is still Paint, but there is a new "Metro" app called Fresh Paint, which has more features. Whether it is better than Paint is subjective.

meezer
meezer

@sonicsteve @Mark W. Kaelin Everybody who needs this type of programming already own a decent one -- Paint is just a waste of diskspace & easily off-loaded. I've still got a full copy of MS Digital Imaging on a Vista desktop & it's still awesomely easy & productive. Too bad it won't read on 8...

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