Windows

Find a better Windows 2000 Professional calculator

Your desktop calculator is fine for simple equations, but you may not know that Windows 2000 Professional has its own scientific calculator for more exotic applications. Learn about a few of its uses and where you can find it.

Do you ever needed to work with hexadecimal, binary, or octal numbers, degrees or radians, trig functions, logs, or other high-level math operations? If so, you might have spent time scouring the Internet for a good calculator program, and maybe even paid a shareware fee for the privilege of using it -- when you might have had the calculator you need all along, on your Windows 2000 Professional system!

A lot of people never touch the Calculator program included with Windows 2000, believing it's limited to just basic math operations. But in addition to its Basic mode, Calculator has a Scientific mode that gives you all the functions mentioned above, plus several others. To switch to Scientific mode, open Calculator and choose View | Scientific. It's not the same as having an expensive calculator that gives you everything including a can opener and screwdriver, but it won't cost you anything extra. To switch back to the "cheap" version, just choose View | Standard. Calculator opens in whichever mode was active during the previous session.

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8 comments
ouzhiyuan
ouzhiyuan

Sorry, it's a duplicated reply.

ouzhiyuan
ouzhiyuan

it supports more functions than the windows calculator, and it's also an unit/currency/color converter. it's skin chaneable. I think it's the best alternative to the windows calculator.

scotts
scotts

Microsoft also has a PowerToy Calculator that does graphing as well as all of the functions of the calc plus.

hambidge
hambidge

Microsoft also provides (as a download) Calculator Plus. Calculator Plus offers conversions between different measurement units for area, temperature, volume and more. It also includes all the mathematical functions offered in Microsoft Calculator. Notice: This application is free and is distributed "as is", with no obligations or technical support from Microsoft Corporation.

SiMechanic
SiMechanic

CALC98 is still my favorite, visit the website at http://www.calculator.org/ It has a library of constants, and conversion factors need for engineering. It doesn't graph, but that is not what I use calculators for. It also supports RPL. It has worked across multiple releases of Windows.

keeperocrumbs
keeperocrumbs

I second that. Calc98 is a much better option