Disaster Recovery optimize

How do I create a reliable backup with Acronis?

Jack Wallen taps into his experience as a consultant to show you how to create a reliable backup using Acronis.

Is it even possible to place a dollar amount on the importance of a good back-up plan? Many people seem to think so, as they often refuse to purchase back-up software capable of handling the job. The problem is that when you begin to create a back-up job using an application like Acronis Backup and Recovery 10 you might find it to be a rather overwhelming application. Or, you might find that the back-up job you have created simply doesn't work. Why? The frustrations experienced with trying to create a sound, reliable backup with Acronis can be many and great. But with a little help, you can have smooth running backups that will give you the peace of mind that often comes with an application that should be "set it and forget it" but rarely is.

In this How Do I blog post, I am going to show you how to create a reliable backup using Acronis. Understand that no two people will agree on what the best practice is for backups. Every situation dictates a different need and different configuration. What I am going to show you is the setup that has been the most reliable for our clients and has managed the fastest turnaround when disaster strikes.

This blog post is also available in PDF format in a TechRepublic download.

Before you start

I will warn you that the back-up plan I am going to outline shoots for simplicity and reliability as its foundation. This plan works only with full backups, so depending on the amount of data you are backing up, you will need the largest external drive possible. We tend to deploy either 500GB or 1TB drives for this purpose. Yes, the backups are large and they can take some time, but they are very reliable when disaster strikes.

This document will assume you already have the Acronis application up and running and that you have access to an SMTP server for sending out e-mail notifications. This will also assume you are running Acronis Backup and Recovery 10.

Step 1: How to begin 

After you have Acronis started, you want to click on Backup Plans and Tasks (Figure A) and then click on New | Backup Plan. You will now start to create a full backup that is sure to be reliable.

Figure A

The Acronis 10 user interface is light years ahead of the Echo release.

Step 2: What to back up

This is the first step in creating your backup. This is where you configure exactly what you are backing up. Most likely you are backing up disks so that you can leave that as is. By default Acronis is going to pick up any and all drives attached to the machine. More than likely you will need to change this to deselect the drive you are using to house your backups. To make this change, click the Change button and uncheck your destination drive.

Step 3: Where to back up

You will basically do the same in this step, except you will make sure your source drive is unchecked and your destination drive is checked. Here's another good tip. In the Name text area, make sure you give your backup a unique name. By default, the application will name the backup "Archive." I prefer to give those backups machine (or task) specific names so I know for sure what each backup is.

Click OK when you are done with this step.

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Step 4: How to back up

This is a crucial step in creating a solid backup. From the Backup Scheme dropdown, check Custom. When the Custom scheme expands (Figure B), you are going to click Change on the Full Backup section.

Figure B

The custom backup allows you to set up Full, Incremental, and Differential backups. For this task we are going to create a Full backup.

When you click Change for the Full Backup, a new window will appear asking you to schedule the task. Decide your backup's schedule, making sure you give AMPLE time for the backup to run before the next business day starts. Midnight is usually a good choice.

After you have set up your schedule for the full backup, click on the Change "button" associated with Retention rules. In this new window (Figure C), you will want to set up how many backups you want to retain.

Figure C

By default, Acronis will keep five backups. This is smart only if you have the space for it.

If you know you have the space for five full backups, keep the default setting. If, however, you do not have the space, go ahead and lower the number of backups to be retained. For some clients we keep only a single full backup. There are instances where keeping only one backup is not smart. Make this choice wisely (it is often dependent on the needs of the client). If you opt to retain only one full backup, you will want to make sure that you have notifications set up and that you monitor it every day.

The last piece of this step is to configure when to apply the retention rules. This option will appear only after you have created the retention rules. If the space available for backup is tight, I would suggest applying retention rules BEFORE the backup begins. If space is not an issue, you can apply the rules AFTER the backup completes.

OPTIONAL: Validation is an important step for backup. The problem with the Acronis validation task is that it can take a long, long time to finish. If this is not an option, you can schedule a validation for a nonbusiness day. Validation will ensure your backup is spot on and SHOULD be a viable recovery solution. NOTE: I say SHOULD because I have seen instances when a backup that has been validated would not restore, even using the Universal restore feature.

Step 5: Which backup options

For many, this is a portion of the back-up process that is too often overlooked. The Options section should ALWAYS be configured for your backup as there are some very crucial settings to take care of. There are times when a backup will fail because of issues with VSS (Volume Shadow copy Service). If this is the case, you will want to disable this feature by going into the Options window, clicking on Volume Shadow Copy Service, and then clicking Create Snapshots without Using VSS (Figure D).

Figure D

Although VSS is a very helpful tool when doing backups, the VSS service can often lead to failed backups.
Next in the Options section you will want to set up your e-mail notifications (Figure E). This option is fairly straightforward, but you will need to have a working SMTP server and you will need to know the authentication credentials.

Figure E

Make sure you have checked all three options in the Send Notifications sections so that you will be notified if jobs fail.

One thing I like to change is the Subject line of the outgoing e-mail. Replace ABR10 with the name of the Server or job (such as Exchange Server or even the client name) in case you have Acronis e-mail notifications coming from multiple machines. This makes it easy to quickly tell which machine was successfully backed up.

Finally, in the Options section, I always like to disable the Fast Incremental/Differential Backup option. This ensures that only a full backup is being done every night. Some will argue against using this type of backup alone, but I have found it to be a very solid solution.

Now that you have completed those option settings, go ahead and click OK in the Options window and then OK in the main window. You will have to give the administrative credentials in order to save the backup. After you have successfully authenticated, your backup will be saved and ready to run at the scheduled time.

You now have a full backup that will be saved to your external drive.

Final thoughts

As long as you have the space for full backups, this type of back-up scheme should work as a reliable means to recovery from disaster. Although there are plenty of dissenters out there who bemoan the full backup over the full/incremental/differential configuration, we have found this setup to work flawlessly for most situations.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

61 comments
amberlodge1
amberlodge1

I cannot understand for the life of me why a major company like Acronis find it impossible to create a Rescue Disk that leaves the drive letters as when in Windows. It just seems stupid or idle to create the extra confusion when restoring an image. I am terrified of over writing my second drive. I even created a WinPE disk and it is still the same with mixed up Drive letters. I would even pay for one if it could be supplied.. Not Good

cal_ford
cal_ford

We tried to use Acronis for over a year with nothing but failures, especially in their 2012 edition. Company denies they have issues however 100's of people on the net, and their own forums, complained about the same issues we had. The execs at Acronis are less then honest and spend most of their time covering their butts and little time on customer service or product. I never seen a company that is so obsessed with PR over doing a job. We moved on to another backup service, could afford the $100's a week screwing around making the back ups work, then validating that it did work.

glnz
glnz

The HD on my wife's laptop (75GB) is too small, and I want to get here a bigger HD. But how do I clone the original onto the new? Use Acronis? I have a 1TB external drive, so do I use Acronis to make a clone of the original HD on the external drive, then somehow copy that image onto the new, larger HD? How do I do that? Step-by-step, please, or please point me to a link that shows how. THANKS.

rodzilla666
rodzilla666

I'm still using a years-old version ... I couldn't get purchased later versions to work and the team of offshore cheatsheet readers they jokingly call "support" sucks!

DaleCisco
DaleCisco

I've been using a different "class" of backup software lately, and it seems to be worth considering. It's call Zinstall zPOD (no, not apple :). What it does is actually create a VM of the PC, placed fully on an external drive. That VM is a full backup image, which is also runnable, on any other computer, without installs. So, if anything happens, you are covered. Its downside is that it does not support scheduled, daily imaging - it's more geared towards manual creation.

eric.smith
eric.smith

I love Acronis! It is so simple, even a noobie System or Network Admin would find it difficult to screw up.. I do, however, find it necessary to point out that Acronis WILL NOT save to a dynamic disk partition.

dave
dave

I have Acronis True Image Home 2010 and began having some problems with the UI after I upgraded to this version this year. The backups themselves seem to be fine but I often experience the UI to be slow or non-responsive. One problem seems to occur when running it on my secondary monitor. Certain parts of the UI completely lock up. Things are better when running on the primary monitor but still odd.

bstrickland
bstrickland

Does this programe back-up all of the system and program files such as Windows 7, Word, Excel etc in case of complete hard drive failure and back-up can restore all of the files necessary on a new primary replacement hard drive that will boot up as those nothing has happened?

bwiedor
bwiedor

We purchased this earlier in the year, and I now wish we hadn't. First, they informed me in May that they had no support for our new Dell server's PERC S300 RAID drivers, but check back with the next update. That next update was September, and still they had no concept of it. Finally they informed me that because Dell did not use open source drivers for the PERC S300 RAID, they could not include them in their Linux bootable media. But they suggested I make first a BartPE disc with the Acronis plug-in, and then a WinPE disc, with same. However, their plug-in on both refuses to properly pull in NIC settings (though most notably in the case of WinPE, the WinPE itself can ping the server). Their support is horrendous, half the time they did not even know what I was talking about, or gave me patently false 'help'. The other half of the time, they are blaming everyone from Dell to Microsoft ("Yes, this sounds like a problem with WinPE. Please contact Microsoft for help.") Avoid. Avoid, I tell you.

john.randle
john.randle

While I use Acronis True Image Home 2009 to automatically create "backups", I have never tried to do a restore from them so their true usability is unknown. What does works better in my mind is the Acronis "clone" feature .. except for that you can not schedule it to run unattended and you need to manually start it.

zafereo
zafereo

I use Acronis' Bootable Backup CD to back my laptop drive up to an identical drive occasionally. This has saved my butt a couple of times. I've downloaded "CloneZilla", but haven't tried it yet. Any feedback from those who have?

Rob C
Rob C

Why Seagate DiscWizard ? It is FREE and reliable, if you do it the correct way. Download the program from Seagate web site. Make a bootbale CD Always boot into the CD to create, or verify, or restore images (I shudder when people create images, whilst Windows is running) Buy an external Dock for $30 (It connects to your PC via USB or eSATA). Buy a Seagate 3.5" drive, and shove it into the Dock (Goes in vertically, and sits there in the fresh air) Create the desired folders. Boot into the CD, and create an image (DiscWizard is based on Acronis, and has been reduced to just a few options). Verify the image. Never stuff with your images (don't rename, don't copy, don't move) "Now who could argue with that" (Blazing Saddles, in the Church)

amj2010
amj2010

well sometimes it gives you the #1722 error, then you have to install the whole program all over...

mike.walsh
mike.walsh

At home I have a Seagate Mirra Sync and Share server that I picked up for $300. It lives in a low-risk room. My family's computers are all set up with partitioned HDDs. The OS lives on one partition and the data lives on a different partition to protect it from the OS getting scrambled. All directories that contain valuable data, on both partitions, and on all computers, are synced to the Mirra server. Any file that is added, or changed, on any computer is normally backed up to the Mirra within 10-20 seconds. The Mirra keeps all files for 8 versions back in case the file is scrambled by a user and saved in a scrambled state (the version system allowed my wife to recover a scrambled address book in 5 minutes by going back 3 versions). Future plans are to move the Mirra to my shed thereby having it in a different physical building for better fire-risk, and to upgrade it to a Seagate BlackArmor NAS. We live on a hill where floods are not a credible threat.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

There's not a lot of data change on that machine, so I back it up once a week (Saturday night) and only keep two backups: current and previous. With a 120 GB drive in the PC, a 250GB USB drive holds it all quite nicely. For the work laptop, I clone the hard drive with Clonezilla every Friday morning (my "Saturday"), or after significant changes in the data on the drive. Corporate only provides an 80GB drive for backups, and it's an 80GB drive in the laptop, so before I start the new clone, I have to delete or move the old one.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Did you back up your data last night? Last week? Last month? How often do you back up your data and is the process automated?

dldorrance
dldorrance

I do not own Acronis True Image 2010, but I do have the 2009 edition. Assuming the two are similar I can outline how to clone your drive. First of all, you will need to format the new HDD. If you cannot place it into a functioning Windows computer as an extra drive to format it with Windows, you may need to buy an adapter so you can hook it up as an external USB drive to a Windows machine . I know, you already have a USB HDD. Here is an example of such a device, which may come in handy in the future. http://www.usbgear.com/computer_cable_details.cfm?sku=SATA-IDE-U2&cats=497&catid=739%2C497%2C170%2C161%2C2345%2C140%2C177%2C141%2C142 If you don't know how to format a drive from within Windows, you might want to google this issue. Now a key admonition. Cloning can be dangerous. The most important part of this process is to be very sure which drive is which. If you get them backwards you will end up cloning your 75 MB drive with the contents of the USB drive, which is probably empty. This is a game ender, as you end up with no data and no operating system and hence a non-functional computer. So be forewarned and be very sure your choices are correct. First, Make sure your BIOS is set so that the CD-ROM drive boots before the HDD. Make sure the USB HDD is hooked up. Shut down the computer. Insert the Acronis CD into the CD-ROM drive and boot from the CD directly into the Acronis program (the Acronis CD is bootable). Now, with the starting screen of Acronis visible, on the left and side of the screen, select UTILITIES. Next on the right side of the screen select CLONE DISK and on the next screen choose AUTOMATIC (RECOMMENDED). At this point you have to choose the HDD to be cloned (the source) and the target HDD (in your case the USB drive). This is where the wrong choice will ruin your day and your computer. Do not assume Acronis's first choice is your internal HDD. On mine, the USB drive(destination) is listed first. Am I the only one who considers this non-intuitive? The process above will take a while to finish; it is slow enough if both drives are internal and even slower when one is a USB drive. At the end of the process you should have a carbon copy of your internal HDD on your USB HDD. Now remove the 75 MB HDD from your computer and replace it with a new HDD which has been you previously formatted with Windows. Having said all this, it occurs to me that you still don't have a drive to place in your computer. If the USB HDD you have can be removed from it's case can you use it? Otherwise, if you buy the adapter referenced above, you could format the new drive with it and transfer your existing software to it.

Rob C
Rob C

Does it self boot (assuming motherboard can boot from USB device) ? or Do you run some Windows OS, and from within Windows you then run the VM ? PS We should mention that it is $99 in case there are other Scottish viewers.

Rob C
Rob C

I use the free (and simpler) version of Acronis (Seagate DiscWizard), as you can see from my other posts. Does your purchased version allow you to create your images when Windows is running, and also allow you to use it when Windows is not running (from bootable CD) ? I would only run it from the bootable CD. Just run it when you go for a meal, or watch TV. Rob PS if I was offered $1,000 provided I only did images from within Windows for the rest of my life, I would NOT accept the $1,000

john.randle
john.randle

If you use the "clone" feature, a bootable copy of the entire hard drive (or selected partitions) is made which can then be used to physically replace the original drive. Very handy when moving to a larger drive.

AntonDeev
AntonDeev

Hello bwiedor, Thank you for sharing your experiences with our products and support. I'm Anton and I'm writing you on behalf of Acronis Customer Centreal. I am very sorry to hear that you had issues with our product and support, however, if you could provide me with the case number, we can definitely assist you with creating a proper WinPE disk. Should you have additional questions or any other issues, please do not hesitate to contact me. Best regards, Anton Acronis Customer Central

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I'm using the Ubuntu-based distribution. There's a minimal GUI that will build the backup command line for you. Since it reports the drives as hda/hdb, you will need to know the brand and size of both your source and destination drives. Over a USB2.0 connection, it runs at about 1 gigabyte per minute.

steveschwab
steveschwab

CloneZilla works great as a bootable disk backup. It will do backup to file or disk to disk backup. The command line interface is not exactly intuitive but if you spend the time to read the comments as they come up geeks shouldn't have problems. I wouldn't give it to my Mother for her backups.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I've been using some old microfloppies that I wrote with DiscWizard, and am still using it for older drives with XP. Works like a champ! I found out the disk diagnostics can save drives once thought to be dying, but just had malware hidden in supposedly bad sectors. Once I analyze the drive, I can zero fill/low level format and make the drive like new again. I only use them, that way, on Seagate or other brands under the Seagate corporate family. The back up works for anything. All of them are still going to this day!

frank.doyle
frank.doyle

Hi Rob, We have a common language, but being 1/2 world away, some word meanings are difficult. Your "Boot into the CD" does this mean "boot the computer from the CD you create"? Your "Never stuff with your images ...." do you mean that once the DiscWizard file is created in a folder, then do not save any other file in that same folder? How do you verify the image? Do you actually attempt to "recover the data" from the DiscWizard file you just created?

Rob C
Rob C

I have a couple of desktop PC's which I image using Seagate DiscWizard (see my other post). I avoid laptops, as they are ornery little critters. However I have friends that have laptops. But I have hesitated getting them on to the same regime as me. Are there extra considerations with laptops, with laptops having their hidden recovery partitions, etc ? No doubt a 'bare metal' image (sector by sector) would do the job, but they take up far too much space. If one did the 'less space using' equivalent, where the DiscWizard finds all the partitions, and the mbr, does that work ok with a laptop ?

glnz
glnz

The HD on my wife's laptop (75GB) is too small, and I want to get here a bigger HD. But how do I clone the original onto the new? Use Acronis? I have a 1TB external drive, so do I use Acronis to make a clone of the original HD on the external drive, then somehow copy that image onto the new, larger HD? How do I do that? Step-by-step, please, or please point me to a link that shows how. THANKS.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Well RARELY, once a year I'll take all my vids and throw them on a giant HD I have sitting around. But then again, this is just a personal notebook, I never have anything on it I can't easily replace or am not willing to lose. When it comes to music storage, DAT's and stuff, I use a different PC, connected to my editing desk and backed up with Veritas onto tapes (hey it was free okay?!)

TechnoDoc
TechnoDoc

Like others, I use Acronis cloning for backups. I have some caveats to help people not learn the hard way about how to do it. Kinda long, sorry... Example: I want to clone a system with a SATA drive C (system and data). To make a clone backup, I add in a second drive (of the same or larger size, and acceptable speed to use as the system drive), usually by dropping it into a SATA removable rack, but on some systems by opening the case and connecting directly to another SATA port and power connector. I then run the Acronis clone process. And here is the key part: I then remove the original drive and replace it with the second drive, and then re-boot the computer. That allows me to verify right away that the drive functions as an exact copy, and it prevent another issue I will warn you about below. I forget for sure if Acronis verifies the clone. I think it does. On rebooting, I suppose there could be some errors in files not related to the basic operating system and boot files, so a successful re-boot does not prove the entire drive is OK. Nonetheless, I usually do not do any other verification if it boots and runs well for a while. But booting does not prove for sure all is well. Critical data could be verified by a Windows comparison program, even something as simple as SyncToy, if you need that extra assurance. The IMPORTANT WARNING about Acronis disk cloning, though: If you leave the new clone drive in the computer and simply reboot into Windows with both drives present, the second drive will PERMANENTLY become labeled as disk "D" (or another letter other than C) I think by the Acronis run-once startup process Acronis left behind on the drives (you see this program run when you are rebooting). After that, if you try to use the drive by itself, it will have become drive "D" or whatever letter it mapped to, and you will find that a lot of your shortcuts and programs that hard code path names no longer work properly, and it's such a general mess that it's unusable except as a data disk. To avoid that mess here is what you do: You can (1) pull the drive and store it with a prominent label and a big warning to ONLY boot with it when it is the only drive in the system if it is needed as a system restore disk; (2) or else do what I do above, and re-boot right away with ONLY the new drive in the boot port, and no other drive in the system. Once I do that, I might as well leave it in the computer and use the new drive instead of the original drive, so basically I move refreshed drives into my computers on a regular basis. After you boot ONE TIME with the new drive by itself, all becomes normal. You can even add it as a "D" drive (or any letter) in the same system and keep your drive synchronized, and it will no longer be mis-named it you later boot with it. If someone knows how to make Acronis behave itself, and not mess up that drive letter I would love to know, but in the meantime I have been at peace that my backup drives are ones that were working fine when I removed them, and that if I accidentally boot it in a computer with another former C drive present, the clone drive letter will not be messed up. The best way to handle all this is to have as extra computer with Acronis installed with at least two open SATA ports. With that setup, you can clone drive-to-drive directly from Windows, and you do not have to buy extra copies of Acronis to keep your other computer's clones up to date. Finally, this all will work the same way using USB connections to the drives, but it will take a LOT longer (and be less reliable) especially if you are doing USB to USB.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

I don't need to back up my Data as it's not stored on C:\ and I always have multiple copies spread across multiple disks that are set up in pairs ie. what goes on D: also goes on E: the only data that is at any "risk" is the temporary working copy on the scratch disk _ The OS / Programs Partition is another story; I use Symantec Backup Exec System Recovery (BESR) and I manually take a monthly image just prior to MS Crash Tuesday and also take a temporary image before any hardware / software changes doing this means every system image takes less than a full Data DVD, even the image of the most SW populated system is under 4.7GB

louwin
louwin

There was/is a lot of press about restoring a SSD backup. Acronis doesn't/didn't set the alignment correctly. Has this been addressed and fixed yet?

knudson
knudson

While I am still using home 2009, I have it scheduled to run several different backups. System (C drive) gets a daily, weekly and monthly image. Weekly full data, with daily incrementals. I have used it to restore files and full image and it performed as expected. I love the image restore, it recovered my system from a HD format in 30 or 35 minutes. The only issue I have had is sometimes it chokes if the backup file is too large, even with backup splitting. But that doesn't occur often. Note I BU to an eSata external HD. To whoever mentioned they use it, but have never tried a restore. YOU DO NOT HAVE BACKUPS. Unless you have successfully restored a file, and maybe done an image restore you cannot consider your backup process complete. If nothing else it will minimize the panic if you do need to do a restore. You will have some knowledge on HOW to do it.

craigc
craigc

My full backups (from business laptop) take nearly 12 hours with Acronis. I back up via Gigabit SAN to DLink 321 (mirrored drives). Incrementals daily with the option "Create a new full backup after" 6 "incremental or differentials" selected.. I've also selected "Archive Splitting" size at 100GB. I had some issues when the NAS became full. I've never used validation. Version "Arconis True Inmage Home 2009" seems to lack "Retention Rules". (I could find no reason to 'upgrade' to the 2010 version.) It was replaced with a horrendous "Automatic Consolidation" option. I now delete old backups manually. Acronis "consolidation" never completed, and so I abandoned it early on. I also perform a "Full Backup" to another external disk once a month for off site storage. Acronis support is poor. I do not love this product, but so far it has been the best I could find. It MOSTLY gets the job done.

bruce
bruce

My aim in upgrading to Acronis True Image Home a few months ago was to 'non-stop backup' my 100 GB system and dynamic data drive, and full backup this and my static data drive (200GB) on a 3-4 day cycle to 3x eSata drives that are physically cycled off site each week. Sadly Acronis crashes frequently and the support team seems somewhat incompetent, and is certainly at a loss. Clean installs with just full backups still crash on verification guaranteed. The backups seem OK with a second manual verification, but the software seems so flakey I daren't restore more than a few files at a time. I'm now prepared to pay more for proper software and support that will at least have the appearance of working properly. Any tips?

Rob C
Rob C

Hi Frank, Yes you create a bootable CD, and start the PC with that in the drawer. It is like a Live CD, with it's own OS (Cough). It shows you a Form asking do you wish to boot into Windows, or into the DiscWizrd. If you choose DiscWizard, it looks for what drives are present/connected, and offers another screen with some choices, EG - Create Image Verify Image Restore Image After it has finished creating an image, you can immediately click the verify image. The verify just reads every portion of the image, to ensure that it can be used (later) for doing a Recovery. You do not need to do a restore, to verify the image. I have a pre-created folder called SDW_Images_P2-8 and I place my images into that folder. I can end up with a few images in that folder. Regards, Rob

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

...a laptop isn't that much different from a desktop. After all, most OEM desktops ship with a recovery partition, too. As far as the recovery partition is concerned, if DiscWizard allows you to select partitions for backup, you should be able to exclude those. My work laptop has a corporate image on it, so the recovery partition is out of the pool. The primary reason I use Clonezilla to back it up is I'm not going to buy a second license for TrueImage. Not wanting to install more software than necessary for work is also a consideration.

TechnoDoc
TechnoDoc

By the way, the above was with Acronis True Image Home versions from about 8 through 11. Also, the progress meter is usually quite a bit off when cloning, and the process goes a lot faster than you think it will. At some point it jumps ahead. 1 TB drives that are 3/4 full can clone in a few hours if you use SATA to SATA.

rodzilla666
rodzilla666

> "the support team seems somewhat incompetent" TOTALLY incompetent!

Acronis Support
Acronis Support

Hello Bruce! Thank you for sharing your experiences with our products. I'm Yana, and I'm writing you on behalf of Acronis Customer Central. I completely share your concern and frustration regarding the situation with support and product. We've managed to find your cases, and very sorry for the inconvenience. The issue with Non-Stop Backup is related to the glitch in the snapapi components. This was addressed and solved in the Acronis True Image Home 2011, and the fix will be implemented in Acronis True Image Home 2010 in the upcoming update. We would like to solve the issue to your complete satisfaction. Our Management team is going to contact via e-mail for the problem details. Should you need anything else or have any further questions - feel free to contact us at your earliest convenience, we will be happy to help you! Thank you! -- Best regards, Yana | Acronis Customer Central

mike.walsh
mike.walsh

It is an upgrade of the Mirra system. Very simple, and full automatic.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

check again: (Test Results) - 22GB on USB = approx. [b]29 - 35 Minutes[/b] - 22GB on Gigabit Network = approx. [b]11 - 15 minutes[/b] - 22GB on e-SATA = approx. [b]7 - 9 minutes[/b] the variable times comes from the file sizes and number of files

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I can't believe that you saved a whole 3 minutes! Man, what am I doing just wasting 3 minutes transferring files? Oh right, going to the bathroom, checking my VMail, email etc. So your case for SATA vs USB is faster data transfer that saves 3 valued minutes, I know what you mean, I used SATA too with the desktop, but I generally use firewire with the sound desk transfers (if needed) but mainly use DAT tapes, as do most studios still.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

22GB on Gigabit Network = approx. 11 - 15 minutes 22GB on e-SATA = approx. 7 - 9 minutes the only thing slower than USB is a 10/100 network, Dial up or worse a floppy and I'm using a 1TB WD Green 5400 RPM HDD attached to the e-SATA for the e-SATA test the following files were used in the test 376,616,760 - 00000001.wav 1,129,844,934 - 00000002.wav 403,422,040 - 20040229a.wav 382,434,666 - 20040307a.wav 412,578,324 - 20040314a.wav 458,225,614 - 20040321a.wav 491,628,818 - 20040328a.wav 440,479,320 - Record-01.wav 376,616,760 - Record-02.wav 1,502,930,762 - Audio~01.wav 1,502,930,762 - Audio~02.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~03.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~04.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~05.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~06.wav 1,502,930,762 - Audio~07.wav 1,502,930,762 - Audio~08.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~09.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~10.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~11.wav 1,502,930,774 - Audio~12.wav 635,042,832 - Template1.wav 846,724,192 - Template2.wav Total > 23 File(s) 23,988,783,500 bytes (yes I do Audio) Edit: Formatting

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

"USB is not good for transferring multiple GB's of data " And there I was thinking it met my immediate needs.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

I gave up on USB and converted all my systems to e-SATA the only USB connections I have now are for Card readers thumb/flash drives scanners / printers and normal external "di[b]s[/b]ks" are connected by e-SATA ports even my portable audio editing unit has a 2-port PCMCIA e-SATA card and a pair of 500GB 2.5" "di[b]s[/b]ks" in an e-SATA box that travels with the unit (my next unit will have an express card slot) USB is fine for the average user who might drop a few photos, docs, mp3 tracks, etc. on to it at any given time but USB is not good for transferring multiple GB's of data

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I've seen so many people say they removed Win7 or mroe commonly Vista after a few minutes and reverted to XP. HOwever, I have a $600.00 notebook that absolutely flies along with Win7. 7 is a completely different animal than previous Win releases, plus you get the security and added functionality that XP lacks. Win7 is excellent with dual core processor management, which wasn't even available (wasn't an issue) when XP was released. It manages teh disk much better too, nearly a year now and I still don't have to defrag, even though I add and delete severak hundred gigs or mixed data each week. Even with indexing and Aeroglass turned on, I have no problems whatsoever. I work with business apps and files, run it through my sound desk for audio mixing/engineering, run teh full Adobe Master Suite for web, graphic and print design, run two or three video editing apps (rendering speed is much faster than with XP), download craploads of TV shows and movies, and play FPS games like COD and MOH (granted I have to back off the graphics settings a bit due the the GPU but I can still get a decent frame rate and more than fair graphics). Let her play with it for a while, if needed you can tweak thing but I'm sure it will work out, IF HP actually sold a compatible notebook with it.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Though it will probably get worse for while now, reasons irrelevant.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

okay that was typo of the year I think. :D My point was merely that people who don't like the partition idea because A) it removes available space, B) if lost is not recoverable or C) they prefer a set of restore diSks, should realize that hidden retore partitions (on any computer I've seen in the last 10 years) actually work around all these issues. they prompt the new user to insert a diSk on first boot (and several more reboots until the prompt is dealt with or the disk is made). They remove themselves after a disk is created and then allocate that space back to th HD automatically. You end up with a factory restore disk, not just an OS install disk. As for larger drives, 500GB is a fair size still, ESPECIALLY in a notebook. If you need mass storage at the desktop, larger drives are available of course, but I have seen fewer people actually NEED one than I have people who just don't remove crap from their systems and fill it up with old movies and music instead. I have a large external USB drive, I don't even bother settign up the network functionality of it anymore, it's just at home, unplugged and used as needed to back up files, store larger files on that aren't used a lot etc. just like an archive.

Rob C
Rob C

I have purchased a laptop for the neighbor. HP COMPAQ 620 15" LED laptop Dual Core 1.8GHz 250GB It is new (but probably not current model). I will apply your advice, when it arrives. I wonder if HP still offer XP downgrades ? I reckon a laptop that is not super powerful, would run better with XP Thanks for 'heads up' Rob

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

You know, that's a lot for a slug. Not much for ... one of those ;)

santeewelding
santeewelding

Slipped right on by me when I read him. But, then, with Oz, I go into automatic supply-the-correct-spelling mode without thinking.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

I'm not inserting that into a PC and I don't recommend anyone else insert it either most notebooks / laptops etc. can't use the 12.5mm 1TB HDD's yet

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

In the case of OEM's with preconfigured partitions, there is generally a shortcut on the desktop, right after first boot it will prompt you to insert a disk to create the OEM recovery disk. Once this is done, it will delete the preformatted partition and add it to the main drive. Now you have a full HD and a factory OEM restore disk too! Most notebook manufacturers will also provide a full OEM DVD to restore the product for around $20 CAD. Notebooks have about as much power as a desktop, good sized HD's (no more 40GB limits),as much connectivity, nice wide screens, FAIR audio (for what they have to work with) all in a small package that can easily be carried around. I said goodbye and good riddance to desktops ages ago.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

it was free. Acquired form a company I left in 2005. I swapped them over to dual DVD backup and they let me keep the tape drive, Veritas I had a few copies of already. Point is, it's backed up. I live with tapes too, artists still use a lot of DAT's as hardware in studios generally runs to DAT before copying to CD.

gishmonster49
gishmonster49

Hi I have several versions of Acronis. I use them to Clone my Systems every few months. I have never had a Clone fail when I switch them out occasionally. This summer my 2 year old WD Black Edition failed and 5 minutes later I was up and running. I was only 1 program behind to install. It is easy for a home user with SATA. I put my data on seperate drives that I back up manually. As I said good for a home solution and it works. The other issue on backups is a problem sometimes. I have had customers backups stop working for some reason and have to redo the settings. But I love the cloneing feature!!!!

bruce
bruce

The snapapi resolutions made things quite a bit worse, so I have given up on the Non-Stop component. I have been working up to raising another support case item, while I build up a history of backup failures. I will appreciate contact from your team. Bruce

ArtShapiro
ArtShapiro

I'm a Windows Home Server user (which has its own share of problems), but seeing a response like this can't help but give one the proverbial "warm and fuzzy feelings" about Acronis' products. Art