Disaster Recovery

How do I ... scan, cure, and optimize Windows with RegCure?

Windows users know how critical it is to keep the registry clear of obsolete, missing, and/or corrupt entries. Most users (and/or administrators) do not have the time or the skills to search through every registry entry to find problematic entries. For that there are plenty of cleaners, like RegCure, to handle the task.

If you are a Windows user, you know how critical it is to keep your registry clear of obsolete, missing, and/or corrupt entries. Most users (and/or administrators) do not have the time or the skills to search through every registry entry to find problematic entries. For that reason, there are plenty of cleaners to handle the task. RegCure Registry Cleaner is one such program.

This blog post is also available in PDF format as a free TechRepublic download.

RegCure

RegCure Registry Cleaner fixes the following errors:

  • Windows install errors
  • Driver errors
  • Windows boot errors
  • JavaScript errors
  • Windows and third-party application errors
  • ActiveX errors
  • EXE errors
  • DLL errors
  • Duplicate entries
  • Invalid program shortcuts
  • and many more

RegCure also contains a start-up manager tool that helps you enable or disable services at startup. The tool is as easy to use as it is to install.

Getting and installing

As with any Windows application, installing RegCure is just a matter of downloading the installation file. Once you have that file downloaded, double-click it to begin the installation process. You will be happy to know there is nothing out of the ordinary for the installation.

Once RegCure is installed, you can select to run the application upon completion of the install.

The main window

Every action of RegCure is handled through a single window, as shown in Figure A. This window has five main buttons, four each to handle a specific task and one to show the results of a scan.

Figure A

Once you click on a task, you only have to click the Scan button to Start Scan.

Obviously the first task to handle is to take a peek at the Settings window and make sure the RegCure settings fit your needs.

From the Settings window (Figure B), you will see three tabs. The first tab, General Settings, will allow you to configure RegCure to shut down after repair, automatically repair after scanning, create a system restore point, check for updates, and prompt before downloading updates. From the Ignore List tab you can manage a list of ignored issues that you create post-scan. From the Scheduling tab you can schedule automatic scans.

Figure B

If you select to automatically repair issues, you might accidentally "fix" an issue that you do not want fixed.

Once you have your settings taken care of, click on the Scan button. From this window select each of the items you want to include in the scan. After you have made your selections, click the Scan Now button and RegCure will do its thing.

On a Vista laptop, the full scan took under two minutes and found 838 problems (Figure C). These problems range from ActiveX entry issues to File Associations.

Figure C

If you're confident in the results, click the Next button to have RegCure fix your issues.

Once the scan is done, click Scan to resolve all the issues found. The next screen will allow you to select specific issues for RegCure to NOT fix. Of course if you are using an unregistered copy of RegCure you will be able to repair only font issues and file associations.

Licenses for RegCure start at $29.95 for a single computer and go up to $549.00 for an unlimited site license.

Backup

RegCure also contains a backup option, which creates a backup of your registry. It is very wise to make a backup of your registry before doing any editing on it. When you make a backup, make sure you are backing up a current, working registry.

With this backup in place, should problems arise with your registry, you can always go back to that working registry. Use this with caution of course. If you have installed new applications since your last backup, those new applications will not run.

The backup (or system restore point) is created prior to any repairs being committed to your registry. This means that every time you run RegCure you will get a new backup.

To restore to a backup registry, just click on the Backup button, select the registry you want to restore to, and click the Restore button (Figure D).

Figure D

If your list of backups starts getting out of hand, it would be wise to delete backups you know you do not need.

Start-up manager

The last feature of RegCure is the Start-up manager. This feature allows you to select various services and prevent them from starting at boot. To do this, click on the Manage Startup button, go through the list of services (Figure E), select those services you do not want to start, and click Disable Selected.

Figure E

You can hit the Select All, but most likely you will not want to keep every service from starting.

This is a simple way to stop some services from running without having to delete the application.

Final thoughts

If you are looking for an outstanding solution for the often-troubling issues that are caused by the Windows registry, RegCure is the solution for you. It's easy to use and reliable and will keep your registry clean and free of errors.

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About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

26 comments
objunior.bhz
objunior.bhz

CCleaner, RegSeeker, Glary Registry Repair, PCCheckUp, SpeedItUp Free are 5 free pieces of software that I have installed in my PC that will do exactly the same as the subject of this article. All work perfectly well, ie, will not leave me with a non working windows based PC or hanging applications. I would really like to hear about freeware that brings some new and useful features rather than paid advertisement.

Ravensnest
Ravensnest

I have been to the forums, here and just about everywhere I can think of regarding this subject. It is about time that microsoft itself came out with a one stop program that does everything. From basic cleanup all the way to complete registry defrag,optimizing and the rest of these maintenance procedures. Everyone says theirs is the best. Since microsoft knows the windows programs better than anyone else I believe they should come out with this themselves and alleviate the confusion. They could release it as a purchased item or include it in the OS as a built in utility or put out an update that would install the sofware into the OS. Having to look for all the maintenance software programs in vista is time consuming and I really don't know what I am doing anyway. So it would stand to reason that microsoft should come out with the right program for vista and other OS to allow people who are not experts on pc workings to be able to go to one place and get the entire pc up to speed and keep it running at it's best automatically so we don't have to play around in areas that we don't know anything about.

JimTheEngineer
JimTheEngineer

One advantage of this article comes from reading the comments! It does appear that RegCure is a bit "iffy" - but others suggested Eusing Software's product: http://www.eusing.com/free_registry_cleaner/registry_cleaner.htm and Advanced SystemCare (ASC). I found ASC a bit dishonest in suggesting that their "Pro" version was free. It was - IF you purchased something else. Worse yet, the non-"Pro" version was difficult to download and install, and, when run, continuted forever without doing anything I could see. I stopped it. Eusing was really free, it downloaded and installed without problem (Win 2000 PRO) and analyzed the registry to produce a list of 2800 problems. However, I can't figure out how to verify that a problem is really a problem, and their help files aren't very helpful. I would REALLY like to reassure myself before going ahead and telling the program to fix stuff. I did select ONE of the problems (invalid help file) and told it to fix it - and it DID! :o) 2799 more to go! Again - thanks for the article BECAUSE of the user comments!

Ocie3
Ocie3

I was really disappointed to read the entire review only to find out, at the end, that the product is crippleware. To use any feature of it that is significant, we must pay the license fee. I'm not convinced that RegCure is worth $30. Reading the review was a waste of my time. I'm not complaining that the software is a commercial product. I am criticizing the fact that Jack Wallen, the writer of this article, did not disclose that fact at the beginning. The number of Windows "registry cleaners" that are on the market at various prices (usually at least $20, some as high as $50 or more) is truly astounding. How many of them provide any benefits that justify their price is anyone's guess, IMHO. BTW, I don't recall ever seeing a Windows "registry cleaner" that was either "open source" or available without a license fee.

DesertPete9
DesertPete9

Both CCleaner and jv16 Power Tools 2009 work great. The first is free, the second worth the small investment.

chiachung1
chiachung1

Well...it seems I might be in good mood this morning, not after carefully read and compare other simliar tools, I just go ahead and purchase it. And guess what although there is a promotion but they through a 9.99 privacy control software in your cart when checkout. I don't feel good and i guess no one well feel good on this. I guess I will carefully review what the author was selling behind the "how to" artical.

TallerAxMan
TallerAxMan

While this application may have some useful features, Techrepublic should preface at the beginning of their review that the author is going to endorse an application that requires a fee to use. I would get more use from a comparison of registry cleaners available and which ones are free to use rather than require a key to unlock the functionality described in the article. As it is now, this article is a waste of time.

kentee
kentee

Everytime I run it (if I'm not careful), it kills my antivirus software (Sophos). If I allow it to resolve Com/ActiveX problems Sophos is disabled immediately. If I clean out empty Registry Keys Sophos is always disabled after a reboot. After that it's either Restore or reload Sophos. Still working on a resolution. Triumph955

bjorntalma
bjorntalma

Any1 ever herd of TuneUp System Utilities? Well...THAT is something worth checking out instead of this RegCure crap. First of all it looks better, it has way more functions, the user interface works smooth like a babies butt, it always delivers what u expect from it, it's like openening a magical box and IMO one of the best all in one tools cuz u can tweak a lot of stuff, its not just bout the reg. Ohw...btw...mr. Angel6677, ALL software is free! it is called WAREZ!!! :D -------> CHECK THIS OUT: Tune-Up homepage: http://www.tune-up.com/products/tuneup-utilities/

eddie.eastwood
eddie.eastwood

Would like to ask Jack Wallen how many continuos scans he had to do to clear the reported 838 problems. From my experience with RegCure or any other cleaner, is that you need to do 8 to 10 continuos scans to them to clear less than 200 reported problems. Then there are a couple let that do not get repaired. Regards clint

je4na
je4na

There are many free cleaners that work alot better ... than Reg Cure

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

I haven't taken the time to clean my Windows Registry lately. Do you think cleaning the Registry file is an important as it was just a few years ago? Do you use a third-party cleaner to do the job? Which one do you prefer?

jose
jose

Hi, I don't know how long you have seen the Pro vs. free issue, as I discovered ASC very recently and it is clearly stated that there is a Free and a Pro version. However, what I would like to point is I don't have the same experience (and opinion) as you have about this product, and I would suggest that you take a closer look at it. I tried ASC Free and I am well impressed with it, and find it comparable to TuneUp Utilities. I don't know if I will renew my subscription of TuneUp, at least before trying the ASC Pro, and all the tools, which are more than those of TuneUp - of course this can change over time. One last thought about free tools vs. payed tools. Everyone like freebies. However, as one must respect others work and as long as asked price is reasonable, I prefer to pay a few dollars and have a good, mantained, and payed author tool over a free one. Thanks.

techrepublic
techrepublic

I totally agree - this article has made me seriously suspect the independence of TechRepublic. A quick google search reveals many unhappy users of this software, and many complaints of a refusal by its manufacturers to honour their 30-day money back guarantee. I'm pretty unhappy about this article.

hideaway
hideaway

You would get a lot farther in this world by making a positive comment and suggestion about your favorite program (and you might even make a friend along the way) I have used both of these programs and they both have their place. In other words if you can't write helpful constructive criticism then SHUTUP!!!!!!!!!11

MyopicOne
MyopicOne

Seems simpler to operate than RegCure, too. I've used it for many years without a problem - updated very frequently, too. Also love the way none of the Registry Cleaner links on the right side of the page compared CCleaner with their for-cost products - LOL!

tonytechie
tonytechie

yep I also agree that it is morally wrong for a advisory body like tech republic to be promoting "free" NOT software and especially software that is risky to say the least.

Bestware
Bestware

TechRepublic is losing credibility with articles like this one. Who are they in bed with?

johncarden
johncarden

The manner in which the comments were made was most inappropriate and unprofessional.

ron.dondelinger
ron.dondelinger

I've used CCleaner for 5 years now, at work and at home. It's basically idiot-proof for end-users, if you walk them through on how to use the Cleaner and Registry tools; just remind them to first close down any active applications. CCleaner is a powerful system maintenance utility in a knowledgable person's hands. Clean and tweak the system, configure CCleaner to run at Windows startup, and forget about it!

Bones007
Bones007

You ask "why and application is being pushed on us too." It's a simple answer... it's called "Green Backs"!!! I'm with you... TechRepublic just exposed themselves for what they really are... in business to make money anyway they see fit!!!

pgit
pgit

I've used Linux for a decade, never bothered to check for viruses on downloads. But one day while evaluating f-prot for use on a mail system I happened to run a scan on the (bulging) folder of win apps/tools I'd accumulated over the years, and to my surprise the CCleaner installer I had was viral! I don't recall when/where I DL'd it, but it was a lesson: scan everything before throwing it on people's windows machines!