Windows

I like Windows Vista better than Windows XP


It seems people have a Love/Hate relationship with Windows Vista. I have been with Windows Vista from pre-birth. I have used Vista, Leopard, Ubuntu, and many other operating systems. I have seen the good and the bad of Windows Vista-agonized over driver incompatibility, praised security and enhancements to the user interface (ui). Now that I have been working with Windows Vista, I wanted to share with you some of the things I love about the new operating system. We all love to talk about the bad stuff daily but let's for just one day, talk about the good.

Let’s begin with how Windows Vista is branding its new editions. They have created 6 different versions of Windows Vista to handle the needs of consumers, small businesses, and large enterprises. The versions are packaged as follows: Windows Vista Home Basic, Windows Vista Home Premium, Windows Vista Ultimate, Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Enterprise, and Windows Vista Starter. For consumers, you have the choice of Home Basic, Home Premium and Ultimate which has all the bells and whistles. Businesses can take advantage of Vista Business or Enterprise which handle the business side of Vista such as encryption and virtualization.

I have been working with the Windows Vista Ultimate edition and for starters, the installation of Windows Vista is aesthetically beautiful to the eye and simplistic by nature. The installation went very smoothly and in less than 30 minutes I had my new operating system singing. I loaded Windows Vista on my laptop and my laptop supported Aero Glass which is the eye candy of Windows Vista. All I can say is amazing. Every time I work on my laptop, I find myself smiling at how beautiful the interface is.

Once I got past the interface, and starting digging around I found that configuring a wireless connection was a snap and that the security that came with Windows Vista was top notch. I was able to create a standard account and elevate my privileges to administrator when the need arises. For example, when I run as a standard user, any time I have to install software, I am asked for the administrator password. Any time I have to get into the admin tools or control panel or any area that requires administrative rights, I am prompted for the admin password. Windows Vista was built similar to Linux in that you do not have to run your computer as a root user. Kudos to Microsoft for finally getting this right.

A feature of Windows Vista that I love is Windows ReadyBoost. This technology allows me to place a USB key in my computer and improve performance without adding additional memory to my computer. Once you put the USB key in you are prompted to view the files on your USB key or speed up your system. My laptop already had 2 GB or RAM. I had a 2 GB USB Flash key and my system is screaming speed.

The newly improved Start menu has been working great for me. In the past you had a huge Start menu with tons of programs on it. With Windows Vista, you simply click Start and type the name of the program in the search bar and it finds it within seconds. For example, you could type work and it brings up Microsoft Word. You know longer have to navigate through the tree to find the program you want. This is a real time saver.

I am also enjoying Windows Flip 3D, Windows Flip, Live Taskbar Thumbnails, and the Windows Sidebar. If your computer supports Windows Aero Glass, you will be tickled by Windows Flip 3D. It allows you to flip through your open window in 3D. It is fantastic. The only drawback is that you need Aero Glass support to take advantage of this feature. Windows Flip is the ALT + Tab combination but it also gives you a graphical presentation as well. Live Taskbar Thumbnails is also a welcomed enhancement to Windows Vista. By simply running your cursor over the taskbar, you get a graphical presentation of each open document. Windows Sidebar is a sidebar that runs on your desktop that allows you to add gadgets. It is identical to dashboard widgets in Apple’s OS X Tiger. On my desktop, I have a calendar, notepad, stocks, headlines and weather gadgets running. I can also go online and download more gadgets that are helpful to me. This is a feature I am really enjoying.

On the backend, all profiles are no longer stored in documents and settings. You now have a users directory and each profile is stored within this directory. Microsoft has also done away with My….There is no longer My Documents, My Pictures, etc. It has been replaced simply with Contacts, Documents, Desktops, Downloads, Music Pictures, etc.

These are just some of the features I have come to love about Windows Vista. It has so much more to offer. I believe other people might see value in other areas of Vista such as Windows Mail, Windows DVD Maker, Windows Games, Windows Media Player, Windows Photo. These are areas I have yet to explore but as each day goes by that I use Windows Vista, I find myself unlocking more of its mysteries.

72 comments
micky_lakshya
micky_lakshya

I like everything about Vista. For me I believe in moving on. People wanted their xp in vista which wasn't possible. Pros and Cons aside, nothing matters if one remains prejudice.Nothing is going to change until we got ready to accept the new ones. Until xp came none of the windows enjoyed much time with users. In months new windows started coming but xp has enjoyed 6 years and now the people are stuck to xp denying its drawbacks. For me, I love Vista truly and it has suffered mostly because of its predessor xp. I even love xp but I understand that vista is far better than that and for those there are drawbacks in vista, weren't they were more in Xp at its release... Think again about Vista, its not that bad, actually its lovely..

hass_alsheikh
hass_alsheikh

I don't really know why every time I search online about windows vista I find people criticizing it, they complaint that it is very slow, unreliable and generally incompatible with hardware and software. For me, the first time I used windows vista, the sp1 was already released. it is a very reliable OS (much more reliable than XP), not slow at all, and compatible with both hardware and software, I can say that because I have a dell OPTIPLEX gx520 and although dell doesn?t have a single driver for windows vista for OPTIPLEX gx520, windows vista automatically installed all the drivers for my machine without telling me to do anything. I just added 1 GB ram in order to speed things up although it was already running okay on 512 MB ram. I also read many times that the most annoying thing in vista is the UAC, but in sp1 you can turn it off in control panel. For me, the worst two things in windows vista are 1- The internet explorer crashes frequently while using it. 2- The weather gadget doesn?t work if you changes the locale to a non-us. But I am sure that Microsoft will fix these things and add some extra features in sp2 or even earlier as a patch or fix.

ashm_01
ashm_01

I dont think it is better work-wise. I am all for new technology but not when it stops me from working. It is really upsetting when I am composing email in gmail and suddenly vista intercepts and restarts the IE. Crap! Luckily gmail saves drafts. But then I lose the window in other tabs I was viewing. Many time after waking up from hibernate, my opened IE are all frozen white while my cpu is hovering at 100% for several minute to half hour. Crazy. I forget why i started my pc for. Stupid. It seems the icons and windows keep refreshing or repainting every so often behind the scenes again costing time. On IE, sometime a click to go to a link at the bottom or do ctrl-F takes a long time to respond. Vista is generally slower despite 2-3 time powerful cpu. I have an xp on celeron 1.5ghz and vista on 1.8ghz AMD 64 athlon x2. I run them side by side, xp returns results faster. At least it feels that way. I dont care about features if I cant work on the pc efficiently. I am sure many people feel the same.

roy.evison
roy.evison

AS an individual user on limited funds Vista is way too expensive.You admit yourself many of Vista's 'new' features are available on Linux and have been for sometime; these include some of the bells and whistles,thumbnails 3D etc. Mandriva 8 is very pretty if you like that sort of thing. Does it have full command line back up, I doubt it.6 types of vista to choose from try dozens with Linux. As for Microsoft copying Linux/Unix security methords-the greatest form of flaterry-surely? The advantages of Vista are, therefore, academic.

jnanning
jnanning

My only dissapointment with Vista (I use Ultimate with 4gig Ram and 1.5Tb of memory storage [yes, a T like in Terra) is that the GIF enhancements were only applied to the first level screens. If you generate a pop-up you'll notice they haven't been updated to maintain the new look and by my guess are as old as Windows Version 3. I do love the new file management system and the gadgets which can't seem to make up their mind as to whether they belong on top or behind my desktop. I also use Windows LiveOne care and can't say enough good things about it. After being a McAfee user for many years it would not work on my computer with Vista but LiveOne Care has been seamless and does a great job, protects all three of my computers and all for less than $20 bucks a year. There are still some bugs in Vista and my only complaint is that MicroSoft seems to have lost its enthusiasm for fixing known problems and that I have been unable to figure out why Vista keeps asking me to get admin approval when I already have it. But these are minor issues for an overall very good piece of software. I don't expect perfection...it isn't going to happen.

squirrelpie0
squirrelpie0

Love Vista? You gotta be kidding! What a waste of a day! Resources squandered on a super bloated OS. Run XP ( which is bloated enough itself- w2K worked fine). You are right about eye candy-Just what the diabetic, obese brain needs- more cranial calories. Invest your time in something worthwhile. Death to Vista, the ME of the 21st Century!!

RCS
RCS

I am amazed that an avid windows XP user finds the "glossy" interface and the simplistic menu system to have any additional value over the enormous resources required to run an OS that really only brings those features to the table. The AERO GLASS feature chews up graphics at an alarming rate. 2GB RAM just to run this feature - hardly seems worth it. Especially if you are using it in an office situation. Get a nice picture to put on the desk.... The installation of XP is only an issue because of the required service update. If the bring out an all inclusinve SP3, this too should be a non-issue. The menu issue also strikes me as interesting. I have well over 200 programs on my primary PC (I support a lot of people) and when I open my menu (in classic mode) I am presented with 9 categories. Each houses subdirectories for all my programs. Essentially, a PC is an electronic filing cabinet, if you are organized it makes life a lot easier. There is also the quick launch to access the most often used programs or folders.... Not really a hard trick to master. I never have a problem finding programs, even those infrequently used. Finally, I am an advocate of the KISS philosophy Keep It Simple, Stupid. More choices doesn't make a better product... Home, Media or Pro (Tablet is self explanitory) depending on your needs is a lot easier to discuss and advise then 6 choices, with divergent feature sets that are non intuitive. Home basic vs Home premium vs ultimate for example. I don't think a slower interface, basic funtionality (which is also available in the previous version of windows) and some gadgets (also available as 3rd party addons), lack of drivers, less intuitive user interface, and considerable hardware requirements to run adequetly makes for a "wonderful" operating system. For what it is worth, I have yet to see a practical advantage associated with a change from XP to Vista....

ac567
ac567

Well, I hope you get your upgrades for free, because if that is the most positive spin we can make for Vista (and there are, as you mention, also many negative views), I'm going to stick to macOS, Linux and XP!

ctdak
ctdak

Some people are easily pleased. I can't believe the euphoria over eye candy. And yes, there are some functional improvements over XP, but not enough for many of us to jump on the bandwagon.

bonkyhead
bonkyhead

You chronic complainers and those of you desperate to show how smart you are can't help but focus on what's wrong with Vista instead of what's cool about it. Perhaps you've forgotten when XP came out how much it was reported to have sucked??? Or maybe you're too young to even know that? Why is it always the bad... never the good we hear about? Is there something wrong with admitting you like something? Is it more "cool" to remain narrow in focus and join in the little club to say this product blows instead of to report what is good about it? Are you that impatient???? As for me I'm jumping on the Vista wagon at work and at home and am leaving XP behind. I waited this long for drivers to come out just like I did when XP was released. My patience paid off and I'm ready to rock, 64 bit style. The fact is I really like Vista, and while I'm still getting used to it, just like I had to with XP, I know I will not be looking back. I respect those of you who have chosen to use your favorite flavor of Linux, Unix, Mac, Atari ST or Commodore 64 for your computing world. Stick with what you like and trust and be happy. As to your telling us what schmucks we are for liking Vista and that we're stupid for not following in your tracks - shut up already.

toats2006
toats2006

you got it right brother!!!!!! windows vista has alot to offer and much exciting to use, as day goes by using this OS you will be thrilled by its features!!!!!!

catseverywhere
catseverywhere

Advanced firewall settings, there is excellent control of just about everything that could possibly be going in and out of the network interface. Just type "mmc" in that quick search thing and navigate to the firewall. You can bookmark places in the advanced configurations, too. Very convenient. Cutting regular users out of the root is also a vast improvement, as noted above.

crt
crt

Seriously you think that having 6 versions is a good thing. Talk about an easy way to loose credibility.

alashhar
alashhar

Really I am surprised to your opinions about Vista. I have worked with vista but I found it slow and sometime unstable! Is it because my PC specification which are P4 3.4G RAM 1G? However few weeks ago I read an article, which is wrote by Jeff Jones at blogs.MSDN.com (http://blogs.csoonline.com/blog/jeff_jones ), the article classify the Windows Vista is the most secure Operating System.

vindasel
vindasel

I have a mostly positive view of Vista Home Premium after having used it for the past few months, but there are a couple of 'features' that are so annoying and haven't been fixed in SP1. (which, BTW was a real headache to install). The defragmenter has been updated to enable volume selection in SP1, but no other improvement apart from that. Not even a GUI. With the high frequency of file activity on my machine, fragmentation builds up rather quickly, so it has to be dealt with. I am aware that scheduling or manually running a defrag is obsolete, given the ever increasing drive sizes. But atleast a GUI and option of selecting defrag modes would have been welcome....and ofcourse speed and performance. No such luck! Anyway, I went with a third-party(yes, paid) utility that has all the benefits of auto defragmentation and way more control than Vista's. It's awesome and fixes the problem perfectly. The second annoyance is the UAC that nags me all the time. I was hoping SP1 would silence the UAC and make it less intrusive while preserving security, but again, no such luck :/ I don't see why it has to ask me to confirm everytime I want to access something in the control panel. Intensely irritating....and no fix in sight apart from turning it off! All said and done, there is no way I'd go back to XP. Vista makes XP look obsolete and clunky. Just ensure you have atleast 2 GB RAM and stable drivers. The Vista UI is generally excellent (apart from the above) and its performance/monitoring tools, stability and compatibility are excellent. I am even able to run Photoshop 6 on it perfectly!

jdclyde
jdclyde

If you have to continually type in the admin password, hope you don't ever pick up a keystroke logger? Just a thought.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

UAC, User Access Control. Think of it as a warning that the operation needs admin level access. The goal in Vista is to minimise the need for it. This could be you running regedit, trying to save a file in a restricted directory. e.g. program files, or the root for instance, or installing a piece of software. Or it could be non Vista compatible software anting this sort of thing. The reason it's doing this is because you like many others are admin. You shouldn't be, you should create another user for your day to day stuff. That way if anything does sneak past 'your' outer security, it will have to ask you to put in your admin password. The big problem is if you get a lots of 'false' alarms through using non vista compatible software, you'll get used to Oking and let a bad guy rip your system up. I average about two UAC prompts a day at work and maybe one a week at home. So when one comes up, I either already know it's going to, or I read the dialog very thoroughly. Basically MS are nagging you to work more securely.

Steven Warren
Steven Warren

It is not a bandwagon at all. In the morning I like whole wheat English Muffins. I usually follow that up with a 5 mile run. After my run, I love a glass of orange juice made by Florida's Natural. I could buy Tropicana but I like Florida's Natural. The juice tastes better in my opinion and the box looks cooler. It is all a matter of choice. Do not make a conspiracy theory when there isn't one.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

In the main and for Vista discussions on this site, there's been a fairly positive reaction. I like it as well, I fail to see what my liking has to do with anything though.

wild0104
wild0104

I think looking at it from a consumer perspective there are only 3 versions (basic, premium, and ultimate). Could you include business in there? Probably. But most consumers aren't looking at pc's coming with business. Is that more than xp? Yes. But by the time vista launched there are now 4 versions of xp (home, pro, tablet, and mce). So is it really that much more? I do however think that microsoft kind of shot themselves in the foot, by releasing versions of vista without media center functionality. That seems to me like a step backwards in their business model and roadmap for windows and other M$ products. While I haven't gotten around to getting vista loaded on either my laptop, desktop or work pc, with the falling price on DDR2 RAM that someone else mentioned, getting 4gb and installing vista is seeming more and more like a good idea.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

generally Aeroglass won't even be available in low RAM systems but if it is enough to offer Aeroglass desktop, disable it, it isn't THAT fancy you'll get bored of it real soon and it IS a major resource hog.

wesley.chin
wesley.chin

What version of Vista are you running? Anything other than Basic calls for at least 2 GB, cause anything higher has Aero on by default. It is surprising to hear of the configuration you mentioned.

EEnglish34
EEnglish34

1GB of RAM is definately an issue if all of the default services are running. Turn off the Readyboost service, IP SEC, and Tablet PC services if you are experincing slow performance. I also removed the indexing feature and remote differential compression. I'm running an old IBM thinkpad that has 1GB of RAM and it is just as fast as XP after I turned off all of the services I'm not using.

jred
jred

I'm currently running Vista on my work laptop, and it's responsive & stable. Note, this is an UPGRADE install! T2300 1.66 CPU w/ 2GB RAM As for the complaints of UAC popping up "constantly", that's just BS. I see UAC less often than I use sudo. I'm an old-school slackware linux guy (spent all weekend downloading the floppies via 14.4 the first time), and I loathe MS Windows, but Vista isn't nearly as bad as everyone makes it out to be...

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

If it's set up and used corrrectly by IT educated people, it's certainly better than any other windows OS. However given that 99% of the forum vista questions were how do I turn UAC off....

crt
crt

>>the article classify the Windows Vista is the most secure Operating System. More than likely this should read : The most secure Microsoft Operating System. That as always been their claim, the latest is always THEIR most secure.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I add and dump over 6 or 7 gigs per day in various files, folders, etc. I move a LOT of data all the time, studio music, band videos etc. and have NEVER had to defrag Vista Home Premium. No matter what I do, how much I add, copy transfer, move etc. it always shows less thn 5% fragmentation. Doing some reading on Vista, I found that this was common as Vista has a much better way for organizing the HD to reduce fragmentation. I'd check your default settings or something, defrag is a non issue with mine now. As for the UAC nag, that WAS addressed in SP1, and three nags/screens were removed completely to shorten the process of authorization. the issue with your control panel can be eliminated by simply adjusting yoru user settings for access. I never get nagged now....by Vista.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

from Linux sudo or using the "run as" command in server 2003/XP. The risk of getting a keylogger is lower then the overall risk of infection while running as an admin user on a windows machine, or root on a Linux box... its just bad practice. The Vista UAC mode FINALLY forces new users to run as regular accounts, but provides a fairly easy system to have the privileges they need when they need them. I actually think MS did good with this, of course they are 10 years to late with it =\

devilmaster
devilmaster

Unless it's a hardware keystroke logger you're safe. The reason the screen turns black when UAC appears is because it's displayed in a protected desktop in which other applications don't have access. The issue you refer to was identified during development and resulted in the protected desktop we have today.

rbgbaggage1970
rbgbaggage1970

I've been using Ultimate since it came out and yes I had hardware issues on my Vista capable Compaq as far as ram and core solo performance was concerned but upgraded both and it now pops with very many applications running 24/7. I have XP boot dual boot and rarely go back. UAC is not an issue I have had it turned off and now leave it on. It's a thing of beauty to be sure but works like a horse as well.Change involves processes that some people find very difficult so instead of finding a solution lets just complain 1st.

ctdak
ctdak

Since when does the word "bandwagon" suggest a conspiracy? That's a new one on me. I'm happy for you that you've found a wonderful OS, but like I said you're easily pleased. That's my opinion!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I think he was addressing those such as Locrian Lyric. Dropped E is a cool scale, hmmmm, no wonder Cobain blew his brains out. NO MORE LOCRIAN SCALES !!! I CAN'T TAKE THIS CRAP!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

A properly installed and managed Vista box walks all over an XPSP3 box. But hey, no need to be sorry. If you can't get your mom to buy a new PC for you, that's okay. Your Sesame Street picture book game will still run on your antiquated box tomorrow.

$dunk$
$dunk$

[i]with the falling price on DDR2 RAM that someone else mentioned, getting 4gb and installing vista is seeming more and more like a good idea.[/i] I can almost guarantee that the cost will include more than just the RAM and new OS. Be prepared to buy new hardware also.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

just have ot pay attention to the claims and read teh reports. Vista WAS the most secure, OUT OF THE BOX. It has reported fewer exploits and holes than ANY other platform, OUT OF THE BOX. This does not suggest it is more stable or secure than Ubuntu or anything else, just that when you first install it, fewer patches and plugs are required to secure it out of the box. or a fresh install has more security protection against exploits than other systens do upon fresh install.

jdclyde
jdclyde

I have NEVER heard of a virus you can pick up on a linux system just by veiwing a web page, regardless of running as root or not.

jdclyde
jdclyde

I admit to not knowing that. It just jumped out at me as a possible security breach if your having to type in the password repeatedly. Of course, I wonder how this will effect the number of users calling up because they can't remember the root password? Having to type it regularly means they will either remember it or will realize they DON'T remember it more often? Can't win either way, huh?

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

2gigs, with 4 gigs of ram, runs like a top. Of course its not a P4 but even with minimal, cheapo hardware it is speedy quick.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

When will that age old bitch end? When XP came out, it was "don't waste your time it is crap and you need to buy a new machine!" Now it is Vista, same thing. But a new machine doesn't cost f-all anymore. I got a really quick notebook for $899.00 Canadian on sale, a high end PC now is less than $1200.00. What's the issue there? Iif you don't have any money, fine, but it's not like Vista means you have to remortgage your house (sorry, I guess that's a sore spot for Americans these days).

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

of Vista Business, runs like hot snot on this system A brand new quad. :p Boot time is about 30 seconds, and login, aero desktop, side panel et al, about 3 seconds. Lovely, it only cost me twice as much as my last system as well. I did consider sticking with XP, but I'm using Vista at work so the extra learning time has come in handy. Anyone who believes that crap about it running on your old 2.4 with a gig, I have a bridge...

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

OMG... you made perfect sense, AND made be blow coffee out my nose... The problem really then is that of being bombarded. On my system it was basically just Office, a few packet scanners, and a media player. I got few UAC requests, and they made sense to me. I guess my pattern of experience with Vista UAC does not match that of many others. I have no answer for this other then software companies fixing their permission structure. I know of several programs we use daily that require local machine admin permissiosn to function correctly, and I would bet they would cause UAC issues... Maybe I should try.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

If you have a pre- vista app and it keeps requesting permission to get out of teh sandbox, it keeps asking. Similarly if you IT admins use the opportunity to lock down desktops, without exactly consulting.... Probably the biggest argument against it, and why a lot of people turn it off, is if you are being bombarded with UAC alerts, eventually you are going to stop reading them and authorise some nasty to go right ahead and buttf**k you...

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

UAC is a good step forward. And after using Vista for a month, I had no issues or annoyance with UAC. I really do not understand every one's complaining about it [UAC].

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

proper separation of privileges. It's far from perfect, but it was about the best MS could do in phase 1. Most hadn't (haven't !) even moved their apps towards XP's security model, going towards a mainframe based full system would have meant rewriting absolutely everything ms wise and unless they went down the VM toute nothing that currently existed would work. In some respects they did do that in terms of protected mode in IE7 and the virtual store. I'm well known as not a fully paid up member of the MS fan club, but I can't knock UAC as long as it is phase 1.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

discount that UAC is a good improvement, just that activeX is crap =)

mailman907
mailman907

You don't have to type in an admin password..it's a split token to kernel, just has you confirm you want something to access the kernel. Now if you're not an admin, too bad for the Lusers.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

disabled UAC or are running as admin. It allowed MS to shift the blame on to third party developers as you should get very few UAC prompts if you follow the model. Course that made it absolutely hilarious when the first unexpected one I got was from MS Visual Studio. :D

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

people will simply turn off uac. And thus run as an administrator, and become bots for the bot nation just as did their XP forefathers. A little patience with the nag screen could save thousands of bots a year...(any non-single man should have no real problem ignoring UAC's nagging)

Editor's Picks