Microsoft

Incompatibility sidelines service packs as Microsoft tries to find a Vista strategy

An incompatibility with Microsoft Dynamics Retail Management System (MDRMS) has sidelined the upcoming service pack 3 (SP3) for Windows XP and the same compatibility issue exists in the first Vista service pack. Microsoft is creating a filter for their Windows Update site that will check to see whether customers have MDRMS installed before applying the service pack for either operating system. In the meantime, Microsoft is advising their customers running MDRMS to avoid installing the service packs for either OS until they can come up with a patch.

An incompatibility with Microsoft Dynamics Retail Management System (MDRMS) has sidelined the upcoming service pack 3 (SP3) for Windows XP and the same compatibility issue exists in the first Vista service pack.  Microsoft is creating a filter for their Windows Update site that will check to see whether customers have MDRMS installed before applying the service pack for either operating system.  In the meantime, Microsoft is advising their customers running MDRMS to avoid installing the service packs for either OS until they can come up with a patch.

Windows XP service pack bugs out (New Zealand Herald)

The newest Microsoft bug comes at a time when the Redmond based software giant is trying to find some way to get Vista sales out of the basement.  Paul Mah wrote in his blog post Monday that Dell would "downgrade" new PCs to XP even after Microsoft's June 30 cutoff date.  This announcement comes on the heels of research showing just how sluggish sales of Vista have been.

Last week, Forrester Research noted that Vista has been pretty much universally dissed by corporate America. Some 89.5% of corporate Windows users ran Windows XP on Jan. 1, 2007, as Vista started to be seriously pushed by Microsoft. But a year later, XP use actually increased, to 89.8%.

One of the features that Vista users don't like is User Account Control (UAC), a service that Microsoft admits was designed to "annoy users" to the point that they will complain to software vendors about the programs that Microsoft says are "written badly."  There are some steps you can take to reduce the annoying features of UAC without actually removing the protection altogether, but it seems unlikely that Vista will suddenly take off, particularly if customers continue to have the choice to downgrade to XP.

Dell: We'll install XP for you, even after the deadline (News.com)

Dell joins Lenovo in allowing customers to 'downgrade' to Windows XP (Freep)

Fixing Windows Vista, Part 2: Taming UAC (ZDNet)

I haven't been a huge fan of Vista even after trying it for nearly a year on a tablet that I used for nearly a year.  I am getting ready to purchase a bunch of computers over the course of the next couple of months and will certainly choose XP as I am confident that it is a solid operating system without the slow response of Vista.  Is there anything that Microsoft could do to get you to want Vista on your machine?

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