Microsoft

Latest poll results: What percentage of your enterprise is running Windows XP?

Microsoft Windows XP is still prominent, but the tide has definitely turned toward Windows 7. Windows 8, however, is out of the picture.

TechRepublic has been asking a very simple question several times a year for the past four years, give or take:

What percentage of your enterprise is running Windows XP?

Over those years, we have seen a slow but sure trend away from XP toward Windows 7 and our latest poll results show the trend continues. It also shows that a good many enterprises are still running Windows XP even though Microsoft plans to stop support for that older version of the operating system in 2014.

Results 2013

Back in June 2009, I suggested that it would be a good idea to begin working on a plan to migrate off of Windows XP. That suggestion was met with considerable resistance, which I found a little peculiar since it was obvious that such a migration would have to take place sooner or later. Since 2009, we have been polling the TechRepublic membership on their Windows XP usage each year to six months to see what movement had taken place.

The latest results from a poll in March 2013 show increased migration to Windows 7 away from XP, but a very definitive rejection of Windows 8 at the enterprise level. Here are the results from the March 2013 poll.

Results 2012

In October of 2012, I asked the same poll questions, the results of which are shown in the pie charts below.

As you can see - there is a definite acceleration in the pace of migration to Windows 7 from XP. If your organization is still using Windows XP, it may be time to ask yourself why, because by the end of 2014 your stakeholders will be asking that question and you probably should have a good answer.

Also read:

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

48 comments
rroberto18
rroberto18

...preferably from its small biz division. also willing to sell an on-site service contract for it? Reformatting a Win 8 desktop back to Win 7 will invalidate the contract. And I don't want a re-furbished machine.

cvicd9
cvicd9

Is irrelevant the question. As after certain time new hardware comes with ONLY new OS and there is no choice. I got use to XP knowing all the kinks and now windows 7 have to learn new ways to do something that was already done. To obtain same result now have to learn new keystrokes. So the benefits are minimal and we can not keep older OS by choice, we are forced to. Business practice not too ethical.

rduncan
rduncan

...Windows 7 true story

lachandler2000
lachandler2000

To me, Xp was the most stable and user friendly OS Microsoft produced. I would be using it now if drivers were available for my laptop. It worked the way I wanted and not Microsoft's way. I do not believe MS thinks much of it's customers, except for the high-end business customers. The impression I get is that customers are stupid and have to be led by the nose. I would probably use Ubantu if it ran everything I use.

kfyap1
kfyap1

Windows 7/8/10 are totally different OSes. Although it retains facets of the old 'Windows', there is a very steep learning curve for the 'not so tech-savvy'. Power users and 'video-philes' would be more inclined to migrate than the mums and dads and the in-betweens. The new OSes seem to be MORE servicing the CPU, Motherboard and Grafics Cards manufacturers than anything. LINUX IS THE GO!!! The Penguin is comparatively cheaper. So are the 'office suites'. What is wrong with a Pentium 4 PC?

jameslajeunesse
jameslajeunesse

Unfortunately, it's not just the cost and pain of upgrading WIndows. Many hardware devices and other software applications are left stranded. The IT community loves the to use terms like "upwards compatibility" and "seamless migration". What a lot of nonsense. When we invested in a bunch of high-end scanners built by HP that operated very well under XP, little did we expect all of that investment to be in jeopardy because HP failed to provide an updated driver. It wouldn't take too much time and effort for an experienced programmer to make the necessary changes to a driver to render the existing hardware operational under a new release of Windows. We all know HP's motivation is to sell new hardware but the original equipment worked just fine and we made an investment in their product. There are other serious migration problems with speciallized software applications developed by small companies that are also left to die since they don't necessarily have the financial support to keep rewriting code just because Microsoft releases a new version of the OS. Microsoft just doesn't see the bigger picture, and other large companies like HP are perfectly willing to leave customers who bought their hardware stranded just because of an OS upgrade. In the early days, I was amazed how easy it was to add hardware and upgrade software on the Mac. I've had to move to the PC platform due to the availability of certain software products that were not coded to run on a Mac or run slower under the Windows compatibility mode. I think it's good for Microsoft to keep developing new systems and to provide new technology but don't loose the exisitng capabilities along the way.

ViejoLoco
ViejoLoco

I retired as a WAN system admin 5 years ago and moved to a very rural area. Many folk up here are seniors, have HP Pavilions and Dell Inspirons with XP Home and are on very limited income. Internet, email and for some, Facebook is all they use them for. To have to buy new hardware and the OS is pretty much out of their reach so they are stuck unless the big "M" were to provide senior discounts. Yes, I spend more far more time than I had anticipated keeping them running, cleaned up, and clear of bugs but for many those old computers are their window on the world. Me, XP on this laptop, Win 7 Pro on my desktop and Windoze 8 in the box because I will have to learn it. Classic Shell helps a lot.

mjc5
mjc5

Point out how replacing all the computers, all the operating systems will increase productivity. Point out how the money spent will be earned bac kin a short period of time. Point out that people go right over to window 8 seamlessly, and with no retraining. Then they will be jumping all over themselves to get rid of all those nasty old WXP machines... Okay, now back ot reality. The problem with Microsoft bringing out such a radical departure in their OS is that this is not the mid 90's, when computer speeds were doubling in speed every couple years, and when an OS like Windows 95 replaced 3.1, and caught on big. Computing has matured so much from those days that there better be a very good reason to make everyone start over again. There isn't. Because now that Personal computers are firmly embedded in every aspect of business, a company like Microsoft has to realize that they aren't driving the bus any more. A better scheme for them would be to allow users to use the interface they are used to using. That means the whole way back to Windows classic . If they want to add new interfaces, great, but give the users a choice. If Microsoft were to update by doing tweaks to their system that improved security, allowed the OS to run faster, and be less fussy, then they could clean up. Instead of every few years making people start over again, they could have incremental paid updates. If we look at just the Operating system look and feel, you could take an early Macintosh OS user, magically send him through time, and set him in front of Mountain Lion, and he would ba able to figure out how to work things in short order. But there are modern interface elements right there too. But Apple hasn't abandoned the way they work. Now imagine a Windows 3.1 user suddenly sitting down in front of a Windows 8 machine. Or even a W95 user trying to use W8.

sightsandsounds
sightsandsounds

I predict Windows XP OS will get an extension. At least untill Window Hate gets FIXED. In the Mean Time Win 7 will be a safe, practical, and affordable place to "Hide"

ChrisTheta
ChrisTheta

I don't see Microsoft's support of XP as a determining factor in whether or not I switch my company. As far as I can tell, they don't really support it now (try calling them - even for a fee you can't get your question answered). I will switch only when my machines start falling apart, or when a critical app will only run on 7.

Cabo Wabo Addict
Cabo Wabo Addict

... no one will use Windows 8. Please don't prejudice people. Every first release of every OS MS has created had slow acceptance. This is mainly due to businesses having to validate all of their applications and wait for the third party vendors who created those applications to make compatible versions. I have been using Win 8 on my laptop since the Beta. There are some applications we use that are not compatible, so I cannot recommend it to my users at this time. I use a Windows XP Virtual Machine for the tasks that are not compatible. I would not want my users to have to do that. On the flip side, I feel Windows 8 it a great OS. It is extremely fast and very stable. I am enjoying using it. I have started using my laptop as my main system. It is a real pain now to go back to my Windows 7 desktop machine for testing my software on that platform.

kctobyjoe
kctobyjoe

Uncle Sam (U.S. Army) initiated Windows 7 sometime last year (XP NO MORE!) PERSONALLY I CANNOT see Uncle Sam creating an image of 8 anytime in teh future This OS is so chock full off *&^^*) Look at the surface tablet commercials If *I* had people doing twirls on a business table and playing like that they would ALL BE FIRED; it s a work atmosphere NOT a circus IT is an OS for getting a job done but purchasing new hardware to take full advantage of NONSENSE like 8 has; FORGET IT I personally have a licensed copy on my rig but really NEVER use it CRIPES what will 9 bring? Windows 7 Pro 64 bit forever!!!

Organic53
Organic53

The reality (in business) is that some folks just won't give up on what they have (as one other commentator noted, "if it ain't broke..."). We are currently in the process of converting to Win8, simply because that is all our vendor is selling. Why did Microsoft change things that worked, why is there a 'ribbon' in Office now, it really adds no value. I know that I have spent more time using help, trying to figure out how to do things in Office 2010. To anyone who jumps on the bandwagon simply because they are paid to ... remember DOS 4. In the real world, these things may take time.

BradTD
BradTD

While I agree with the overall viewpoint regarding Microsoft always looking to make an extra buck regarding their software and O/S upgrades, I have to shake my head at folks who really feel that there is no need to upgrade a 12-year-old O/S. Windows XP has indeed been Microsoft's best O/S of all time, but it won't be supported with security patches another year from now! Plus, Windows 7 is for sure a more secure O/S by far than XP is (both for better and for worse as far as end user convenience is concerned). I agree with avoiding Windows 8 like the plague, but by all means anyone who is on Windows XP needs to migrate to Windows 7--or something equivalently modern and secure. If enough people or businesses don't, I suspect that there will be a huge market for hackers/crackers to wreak havoc on them--stealing information, performing DoS attacks, etc. In today's world where cyber attack incidents seem to increase exponentially from year to year, that is a risk I am not willing to take.

gruch_s
gruch_s

While Windows 7 is a good OS, XP is still needed for some legacy apps. Some software is essential for business operations but the software vendors are out of business and hence cannot update their software. Also, some classic games like Myst cannot be played on Win 7. Forget "XP Mode" on Win 7 - too slow to load and frequently gets corrupt. It is too much of a hassle. The solution is to keep a few XP computers around for these, and use Windows 7 for the rest of the apps. I have a few clients who have bought refurb XP computers, plus spares for backup, just for this purpose.

BAW30s
BAW30s

I quite agree, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. I was taken aback when I visited my lady friend's place of work a year ago (the human respources department in a large construction company) to see that she was still using Windows95! It did the required job of maintaining the records perfectly well, and was stable and responsive - in fact, more responsive than most modern computers I have tried. It was even used on the web, admittedly perhaps in a fairly limited way, and had not succumbed to malware as a result of lack of support from Microsoft. I sometimes think that the importance of these updates is exaggerated. It is true that the latest version of Internet Explorer usable on XP is 8, but I imagine that later updates on other browsers will be available for a long time to come. Opera supported Windows95 until about a year ago.

promytius1
promytius1

I woke up this morning dreaming about M$'s OS W7 - that's a whole other problem; anyway, how anyone can look even casually at W7 and think "not broken" is thinking irrationally M$ has never delivered a complete, bug-free operating system. If all products were made to the level of incompetency that W7 and all its predecessors reached, we'd be extinct. What do you get here? 3 colors to choose from. One selection at a time in explorer. Impossible to make a simple visual comparison of two folders without opening two file managers. Everything in the OS is rudimentary at best. It is the slowest search; it doesn't even know what's connected to it, it is buggy as hell after how many decades of development? It is a wide open, bleeding hole, oozing personal data, passwords, account numbers - tell me this - how much evil has M$ provided to the world - here, use this really bad OS and allow trillions of dollars to flow into the hands of anonymous, greed-driven programmers and other 'fine' people. Not broken? Never worked out of the box. If your spoon worked this bad, you'd starve. If Medicine ran this way, you'd be dead. If the law worked this way, you'd all be slaves--oh, wait, that's already happened. The only bright light here is that the Earth is finally starting to communicate with M$ - you hit them really hard on the head - that almost got their attention. "Hello in there?" "Windows8 totally sucks, and we're not buying" "Not this time, dummies" there still may be hope, but by the time we get a real stable, secure, powerful and adequate OS, we'll all be memories in our grandchildrens' minds. I've always run a double boot system; the last iteration was poisoned by a breach in the W7 'defense' wall - consisting of a Eula and a list in Redmond, VA - this rebuild it's just 7, and it will stay that way until I can't patch it anymore. It's a terrible OS, unreliable, crashes all the time, driver issues, dlls that disappear, etc., etc. What can one do? The worst development in all of history is Microsoft, period.

joe
joe

companies learned a lesson following y2k, when they were advised to go buy new stuff. then, nothing happened as y2k wasn't an issue for most. so now we are being told to throw away your xp machines and go buy new stuff. yeah, right.

Orlbuckeye76
Orlbuckeye76

a Windows 7 image. We probably would have been on Windows 7 earlier but our Enterprise financial system was browser specific. We also have Gmail and when we open the mail it has a message on top upgrade to a more modern browser meaning use Chrome. Well then we have sharepoint which requires Internet explorer. We we're upgrading our ERP to a system in the cloud so the that will allow us to use a modern browser. Companies that stay will XP won't be getting OS security updates and they won't be getting browser updates and that could be a real problem. XP is far behind Windows 7 in browser versions that will run in the OS. In 2001 we replaced all our hardware and planned to fo this every 4 year but with the financial slowdown we stopped in 2008 and basically only replace when needed. I'm not sure if we will ever return to a set schedule for replacing systems.

grh
grh

As said above, if it ain't broke - don't fix it. Change for changes sake is pointless and a waste of money. If XP is running and working as you need it to why change? It is like the majority of Office users, most bang out the odd letter, the odd spreadsheet and the odd publisher doc. All within the scope of XP. Sure if you are company that has to change, be my guest, but a lot is just change for changes sake. How many make full use of all the bells and whistles in the office suite for example? I reckon most could, in all honesty, do what they have to in Wordpad? Most home users - and probably at work too - have computers that are grillions of times more powerful that what was used in the moon landings. Has their life become better for it. No. All it is is the commercial mill - change, change and more change. Why? Because they have to keep selling something to make money. Want proof? Look in a PC World and see how much stuff changes - printers for eaxmple; all different, all incompatible, chuck out and renew. Brave New World is alive and well.

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

Never called for MS support before, never will from now on. Just in case, we purchased several 1TB mobile drives and are making backups of C: drives for all computers in the company (those that are still Windows, because we have a lot of Linux office machines). And that's it! When and if they break, we'll use the backups to restore. This way we can work with XP for a good decade from now on. After that... Linux will probably be our way. For everyone except accounting and DTP. But by 2023.... Who knows?!? Anyway... The organisation I work for DOES NOT EVEN consider upgrading the software to Win 7. And frankly, I see no reason to.

Micke12
Micke12

People and businesses these days are so strapped for cash, and XP is so reliable that people don't want to change. There is an old saying : 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it.' The only people that need to upgrade are those who are power users and require the new abilities that Windows 7 or Windows 8 gives them. Mice and keyboard are still good for most things, and touchscreens are really only useful in the sales market at the tills. We all like working on desktops, and Windows 8 makes it so that you automatically boot into touch screen, and yes, I know it is only one touch away from the desktop, but that is time wasted. If a companies old hardware is fit for purpose, why upgrade the stuff at massive expense when cashflow is tight. I loved XP, but my laptop does not support it, otherwise I would go back to XP. I am however stuck with Windows 7, which is OK, and whilst not as memory hungry as Vista, still uses a lot more memory than XP. Ok, I have some some 16 GB RAM in my laptop, which to some might seem OTT, but when Windows 7 takes 1.5 GB of RAM just to boot up, I decided that the extra RAM at just £16.00 Sterling was great value for money. I have used every windows version form windows 1.11 up, and used MS-DOS. I have yet to find a Windows version that is more reliable and less memory intensive than XP. So what if you can't use MS-Word or some other software that is designed for Windows XP. there are many many soft-wares out there that are as good as the new OS versions of Word or Excel, and they are free or very cheap for volume licencing and they are jsut as good on Windows XP as the new Windows 7 or 8 soft-wares that are available, at a much lower percentage of the cost that the new versions. You don't have to buy a new machine and pay through the nose for good software to run on the older machine, so why spend money un-necessarily. The only reason to do that would be if the tax relief on the purchases were worth it. And it pays to remember that as soon as you plug in and switch on the new machine, it's value decreases by 40 percent immediately.

tommy
tommy

What's obvious about it? Bigger firms may have the cash to migrate on mass but most don't. The obvious route is to migrate when you need to replace pc's as they break beyond economic repair, not bin perfectly good machines that are still fit for purpose just because of debatable improvement in a newer O/S. It's been made clear before, and eloquently is this thread. There's a great deal more to O/S migration then slapping a DVD in the drive and hitting Setup. What should be obvious would be the business gains of migration. If there are none then it's obvious that companies won't do it just because MS says that you should.

wwgorman
wwgorman

At the moment our network has 2 units still running Windows XP, 1 unit running Windows Vista, and two running Windows 7 Professional. Except for the Windows 7 Pro units the others are the Home Edition. We expect to upgrade the 2 XP units to the minimalist Windows 7 version and leave the Vista computer alone for now and possibly retire it entirely rather than upgrade it in anyway. We attempted to upgrade the Vista unit to Win 7 Pro but failed because the larger hard drive we bought for the upgrade had a problem we did not recognize until much later. We simply kept switching the Vista hard drive back in and then later try moving more programs to the Win 7 drive before we gave up completely. The Vista computer was under powered for Win 7 Pro.

PeterM42
PeterM42

......you don't buy anything.0 from Microsoft - always wait for the first x.1 release or SP1 (Remember "Vista" was NT6.0 "Windows 7" is NT6.1) Windows 8 on the desktop will not take off until the Metro "toy" interface becomes an option as provided by the superb "Classic Shell" software (or gets ditched altogether) . Corporates do not want to pay the MASSIVE bill for retraining users to use something which basically is rubbish.

Fairbs
Fairbs

I suspect that the changes in percentages is due in part to the difficulty in obtaining PC's pre-loaded with XP.

AnonyJew
AnonyJew

I work at a community college in the IT department and we have a mix of Windows XP, 7, iOS, and Windows 8. This is a major hassle for us because our servers are running Windows Server 2008 and UNIX. Integration is nearly impossible and many of the faculty are resistant to migrating to a new operating system.

SalSte
SalSte

At this point, we're down to 5% of our equipment running XP. Of that, half are physical machines for applications which need a hardware connection to the devices they control, and the other half are virtual hosts. Once XP support dies we'll firewall off the phyiscal machines, stick with an AV client that supports the OS and go until the machine dies, or we find a suitable replacement application.

pgit
pgit

I'm having a hard time getting people to commit to something/anything after XP support ends completely. The main problem is the hardware they are using is XP era and itself needs to be replaced. But around here everyone wants to get "maximum utilization" out of their hardware, meaning they replace it when it dies. I have pointed out that win7 won't be available with new hardware forever, that it's a good idea to update hdw and XP simultaneously. The deals today are 100 times more power for the buck than when the existing XP machines were first purchased, but wallets are understandably very tight these days. Too bad, this really is a buyer's market for PCs, and bonus they come with win7 at the moment.

krisoccer
krisoccer

But I'm sure there are still plenty of users in roles that don't require them to be on the latest platform that are still on XP. But we have to be secure, so all desktops will be moved to Windows 7, Windows 8, and/or SUSE Linux (SLED) by April of 2014.

rickscr
rickscr

We are about 25% XP with plans to be 100% W7 by the end of the year. Nothing really compelling about Windows 8 other than a bit of an improvement in speed. Will wait it out for the next version as the UI could use some tweaks for people with out a touch screen imho.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I will have to switch to Linux when that fateful date occurs. I may be ready for expansion with whatever flavor of Windows is available by then, though. I bet it isn't Win 8.1!!

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Where is your organization on the Windows XP migration spectrum? Are you currently implementing a plan to move off of Windows XP? What is your timetable?

JCitizen
JCitizen

going to a brick and mortar store that specialized in just that. We have one in our neighborhood that has fantastic deals in "white box" machines they custom build and guarantee for their customers. This is great for folks or SMBs that just don't have time to maintain their equipment, or don't like getting ripped off by having to repair an OEM Desktop/laptop that just went out of warranty. These shops often sell quality builds, that exceed the standard of even the OEMs like HP and Dell; and they give WAY better service to boot!! Plus they will always give you more leeway for customer loyalty. Another factor, is the fact that each component in that machine has an individual warranty and support from the OEM component manufacturer. These kind of support features are way better, and last for years in driver and factory support. The component manufacturers have a much better track record than the big box builders like HP,Dell, and Gateway. This has been my experience every time. You might even consider building them yourself if you have the skill sets and patience to research your requirements.

pgit
pgit

Amen to that. They make me cringe. My wife, who works her butt off, mocks them whenever she see them, "I wish I could do THAT!," "gee, that sure would make work fun!," "does that come with a choreographer?" ...and many comments unfit to print, depending on how many times she's already seen the ad in a given sitting.

pgit
pgit

As I say above (and everywhere anyone will listen) I think this is the most opportune moment ever to buy new systems with win7. If I cut the checks it'd be a done deal across the board. Unfortunately the folks who do control the purse strings aren't convinced of that, and don't see the security implications at all.

pgit
pgit

I use the compatibility settings on the context menu for both installing and running legacy apps. To date I've had no problems with any of them... so long as I remember to set the compatibility on the installer. :P

pgit
pgit

I have 2 users on win95, just like in your experience these machines run fast and get the job done. The reason they have survived is they have never been connected to the internet. I have one client I'd have no problem leaving XP on their machines, they only use one app, and it doesn't run well on any other than XP. Problem is they need internet access on all the machines as well, to look up (and display) info for their clients. I have to be concerned about the end of security updates for XP. BTW that client is typical, in that they are constantly disabling the noscript plugin in firefox. The reason they do this is the worst possible: they want to show someone a joke they recently saw, or check out some 'blooper' video of their favorite entertainer, etc etc. The stuff you should be avoiding like the plague in a work environment. I ran this fact past the owner and he said he had no problem with employees having a little fun on the job, he says it improves productivity. What happens after XP security patches are gone? I tried to convince him there will be increasing potential for mayhem as time marches on. His response was "you'll figure it out." Seeing as I'd already run by some proposals and concluded the budget for upgrades is $0, I 'figured out' he means they'll run XP and take their chances.

jthompson
jthompson

Medicine kills people all the time. I am sorry you have had such an issue with Microsoft. I have worked in the nonprofit world for over a decade now, and I can tell you that Microsoft does an enormous amount of good in this world. It is easy to look at the "big bad company" and assume all things coming from that company are evil. But remember, it is a company full of human beings like you and me. We are almost 100% W7 and the results have been great. the OS is far more secure than XP and while there are some things I would change, the UI is easy to learn (even for my old-school teachers) and easy to navigate. And before you go and say "well he is at a school where they lock everything down and buy new computers every 3 years..." I get old compouters from the local college, most never intended for W7 and we give all of our faculty and staff administrative access on there school-assigned machine. I know it sounds crazy, but with a little education and a decent firewall, we see less infections today than when we were on XP. Lastly, lets not forget that Microsoft is creating an OS to run on a plethora of hardware configurations. Some of the worst installations I have run in to had nothing to do with MS, but were issues with bad/mismatched hardware configs or even OEM custom building installs that can't be recreated. I had a Gateway laptop that never worked with a fresh install from an MS disk, it would only install all the drivers if you used the Gateway disk. Very frustrating, but not really Microsoft's fault.

Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin

16 gig of memory is an incredible amount of memory in a Laptop? That's got to be one bloody big laptop! Incidentally Vista an win 7 and 8 use RAM memory in a very different way to win XP and its previous families.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"We expect to upgrade the 2 XP units to the minimalist Windows 7 version ..." You can't directly upgrade XP to 7. A W7 installation will wipe the XP drive. You can upgrade XP to Vista, and Vista to 7. Make sure you have Vista and 7 drivers are available for all your hardware before you start, and have at least the video and network drivers available locally (CD, flash drive, etc.).

fjp
fjp

"100 times more power for the buck" But what matters is usable power or speed improvement. Dump Office 2013 on a new machine and it will work little faster than O2003 on an old P4 with XP. I even have a 13-year old laptop with Win 2k and Word 97 and it's perfectly usable. Some people change their car every 2 years, some wait until they wear out...

ITassasin
ITassasin

"maximum utilization" Damn right! Until the hardware or OS start affecting productivity or security, I see no need to upgrade. Jenny in cubicle 9 doesn't need win8 an i7 or 8GB RAM to to be more productive at Microsoft word.

bitboss1
bitboss1

My servers are running web based apps only - users are welcome to use any Windows OS they prefer (no takers for 8!!!) as long as browser is compliant. About 60-40 XP to 7 and a couple of dozen iPads (Citrix Receiver). Users that prefer to use Win7 invariably have upgraded private use computers to 7. I expect Microsoft to extend XP support again - at minimum security updates (enterprise pressure will be intense).

Micke12
Micke12

Not a big machine Richard. Just an HP Pavilion, not designed to take 16GB ram, but happily installed anyway, and no probs with blue screens or other such, just high speed 64 bit Windows 7. Imagine what this machine would be like if I could get the drivers for Win XP X64. reminds me of the movie, Grease. greased Lightening. I know that Win 7 and 8 use more ram than XP as they don't like swap files as much and with 16 GB ram you can turn swap files off totally and not have to worry about system memory running out, but if you really want to boost performance, plug in a nice 64 GB high speed USB 3 memory stick, and allow the Win 7 or 8 OS to use that as extra ram using readyboost. Add a 256 SSD hard drive and you could run the country with that setup. My processor is only 1.9 GHz dual core, but it is fast and I use a hybrid hard drive from Momentus.

JCitizen
JCitizen

offering Laptops with that as installed memory, with i7 3rd generation processors, ATI GPU 3Gb graphics chips onboard - HDMI outputs, and USB 3.0 ports - of which were several! Yeah it was something to see, but that market has dried up - I think HP would like to drop out of the Desktop and lappy market altogether.

ontek
ontek

Why do you insist on taking this to one extreme or the other? Of course you are going to be a good stewart of you money and equipment. There comes a point where the time you waste justifies the expense. I would have you rather said something more intelligent like - we have an application that won't run on windows 7 or 8 with the version we are running. Until we can afford to upgrade everyone to the new version at the same time we are in no hurry. Jenny is the one doing all the work so it doesn't make any sense to give the boss the i7 machine when he isn't there 80% of the time but that is who has the machine they never use!

sysop-dr
sysop-dr

XP is not going to get any extension of it's life. But that won't stopp people from using it. IF you do you may as well hang out a sign, 'make your bot net here please.' It's old, it's slow, it is insecure and it's dead. Switch to 8 now is your best bet. Users will have some problems at first but then will thank you for it. Developers and IT types will just complain and you have to tell them to grow up and get back to work.

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