Microsoft

Make the Move To Folder and Copy To Folder commands easily accessible

Greg Shultz shows you how to make the Windows Vista Copy To Folder and Move To Folder more easily accessible.

Two of the handiest file management tools in Windows Vista are the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands, which allow you to copy and move files or folders anywhere you want simply by selecting an item, a file, or a folder and then choosing the desired location from the resulting dialog box.

Unfortunately, these handy commands are hidden away on the Edit menu in Windows Explorer and Computer. Further masking their existence is the fact that the Menu bar is hidden by default in both Windows Explorer and Computer.

Fortunately, you can add the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands to the context menu with a couple of registry edits. In this edition of the Windows Vista Report, I'll show you how to make these commands more easily accessible. As I do, I'll show you how to use them to your advantage when performing file management operations.

This blog post is also available in the PDF format as a TechRepublic Download.

Editing the registry

To launch the Registry Editor, click the Start button, type Regedit in the Start Search box, and press [Enter]. When the UAC dialog box appears, respond appropriately. When the Registry Editor appears, navigate to the following folder:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTAllFilesystemObjectsshellexContextMenuHandlers
When you get there, click on the ContextMenuHandlers folder to give it the focus. Then, pull down the Edit menu and select the New | Key command, as shown in Figure A.

Figure A

Make sure that the ContextMenuHandlers folder has the focus before you select the New | Key command.

When the new value appears, type in the following code including the brackets:

{C2FBB630-2971-11D1-A18C-00C04FD75D13}

After you do so, just press [Enter] and the Copy To Folder command will be added to the context menu.

Now, pull down the Edit menu and select the New | Key command again. This time when the new value appears, type in the following code including the brackets:

{C2FBB631-2971-11D1-A18C-00C04FD75D13}
After you do so, just press [Enter] and the Move To Folder command will be added to the context menu. When you're done, your ContextMenuHandlers folder will look like the one shown in Figure B. To complete the operation, close the Registry Editor.

Figure B

Simply adding these two keys to the ContextMenuHandlers folder is all that is needed to add the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands to the context menu.

Using the commands

Using the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands is easy, and they work the same regardless of whether you're copying/moving files or folders. All you have to do is right-click on the file or files you want to copy or move and then select one of the commands from the context menu, as shown in Figure C.

Figure C

Select Copy To Folder or Move To Folder.
For example, if you choose the Copy To Folder command, you'll see the Copy Items dialog box, shown in Figure D, which as you can see is a standard Browse dialog box.

Figure D

The Copy Items dialog box works just like a standard Browse dialog box.
You can just navigate the tree to select between drives, folders, and even network resources. If after you select your destination, you want to copy the files to a brand-new folder, you can click the Make New Folder button and a new folder will appear, as shown in Figure E. Once you give the folder a name, just click the Copy button.

Figure E

To create a new folder in the destination, you can use the Make New Folder button.

The Move To Folder command works the same. The only differences are that the dialog box is titled Move Items and the button is titled Move.

What's your take?

Now that you know how to add the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands to the context menu, will you do so? Stop by the discussion area and let us know what you think.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

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