Windows

Microsoft Windows 7 pricing deals spark interest and controversy

Greg Shultz separates rumor from fact to reveal the official known pricing and upgrade path for Windows 7.

In a recent post on his ZDNet blog, Ed Bott reported that he had uncovered details confirming both the availability and the price of the Windows 7 Family Pack and three Anytime Upgrade products for Windows 7 in a couple of inadvertently posted Web pages. That blog sparked quite a bit of interest in the following days as the story spread across the Internet via quotes and links. It seems that a lot of people are interested in finding out whether Microsoft is going to continue offering pricing deals, like the special, time-limited offer, Windows 7 preorder campaign, in order to help users feel compensated for all the pain caused by Vista.

In case you missed it, the Windows 7 preorder campaign ran from June 26 through July 11 and allowed consumers in the U.S. running either XP or Vista to preorder up to three copies of Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade for $49 or Windows 7 Professional Upgrade for $99. If you were able to take advantage of these deals, you saved between 50% and 60 % off the standard retail cost.

As for the Windows 7 Family Pack and Anytime Upgrade pricing divulged in Ed's blog, while they sound reasonable and would also represent some aggressive pricing as well as great deals for consumers, it is impossible to tell whether the prices listed on the leaked sites were real or just placeholders. As such, we'll just have to wait until Microsoft unveils the real pricing for these special packages.

In the meantime it is important to take notice of the Windows pricing already revealed by Microsoft recently on The Windows Blog.

This blog post is also available in PDF format as a free TechRepublic download.

According to the blog

The estimated retail prices for upgrade packaged retail product of Windows 7 in the U.S. are:

  • Windows 7 Home Premium (Upgrade): $119.99
  • Windows 7 Professional (Upgrade): $199.99
  • Windows 7 Ultimate (Upgrade): $219.99

And the estimated retail prices for full-packaged retail product of Windows 7 in the U.S. are:

  • Windows 7 Home Premium (Full): $199.99
  • Windows 7 Professional (Full): $299.99
  • Windows 7 Ultimate (Full): $319.99

While it might seem that this pricing is pretty standard fare, when you compare these prices to the prices of similar Windows Vista packages you will find that Microsoft is already offering up some good deals. Let's take a closer look:

The retail prices for the upgrade packaged retail product of Windows Vista in the U.S. are:

  • Windows Vista Home Premium (Upgrade): $159.95
  • Windows Vista Business (Upgrade): $199.95
  • Windows Vista Ultimate (Upgrade): $259.95

As you can see, there is a $40 difference in the price of the Home Premium and Ultimate. In other words, the Windows 7 upgrade versions of these two packages are each $40 cheaper than the Vista versions. The prices for Windows 7 Professional and Vista Business are the same.

The retail prices for full-packaged retail product of Windows Vista in the U.S. are:

  • Windows Vista Home Premium (Full): $239.95
  • Windows Vista Business (Full): $299.95
  • Windows Vista Ultimate (Full): $399.95

Here, the full version of Windows 7 Home Premium is also $40 cheaper than the Vista version. Now what is really astounding is that the full version of Windows 7 Ultimate is $80 cheaper than the Vista version. Again, the prices for Windows 7 Professional and Vista Business are exactly the same.

Use caution

Of course, as you look at all these prices, keep in mind that these are the MSRP (Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price) prices. The actual street prices will vary and will be lower, but they are all based on the MSRP.

Vista Anytime Upgrade

Even though we don't have any real Windows 7 to Vista comparison at this point in time, it is worth listing the Windows Vista Windows Anytime Upgrade prices -- just so we have them available and in mind for later.

  • Home Basic to Home Premium: $79.00
  • Business to Ultimate: $139.00
  • Home Premium to Ultimate: $159.00
  • Home Basic to Ultimate: $199.00

Past Windows pricing

All this talk of Windows pricing and comparison made me wonder about the pricing of previous versions of the Windows operating system. So I did some research and turned up some interesting information and pricing details.

Windows 95

Windows 95 was released on August 24, 1995:

  • Windows 95 Upgrade: $109
  • Windows 95 Full: $209

Windows 98

Windows 98 was released on June 25, 1998:

  • Windows 98 Upgrade: $109
  • Windows 98 Full: $209

Windows 98 SE

Windows 98 SE was released on May 5, 1999:

  • Windows 98 SE Upgrade: $109
  • Windows 98 SE Full: $209
  • Second Edition Updates Disc: $19.95 (plus shipping and handling)

The Second Edition Updates Disc was designed as an upgrade for existing Windows 98 users.

Windows 2000

Windows 2000 was released on February 17, 2000:

  • Windows NT to 2000 Professional Upgrade: $149
  • Windows 9x to 2000 Professional Upgrade: $219
  • Windows 2000 Professional Full: $319

Windows 2000 provided two upgrade versions/price points: one for 9.x users and one for NT users.

Windows ME

Windows ME was released on September 14, 2000:

  • Windows ME Upgrade: $109
  • Windows ME Full: $209
  • Windows Me Promotional Step-Up: $59.95

The Promotional Step-Up package was a promotionally priced product, was only available from September 14, 2000, through January 15, 2001, and was designed to make it more affordable for Windows 98 and Windows 98 Second Edition users to upgrade to Windows ME.

Windows XP

Windows XP was released on October 21, 2001:

  • Windows XP Home Edition Upgrade: $99.99
  • Windows XP Home Edition Full: $199.99
  • Windows XP Professional Upgrade: $199.99
  • Windows XP Professional Full: $299.99

If you compare the prices of the upgrade and full versions Windows XP Professional to Vista Business and Windows 7 Professional, you'll see that the pricing is consistent. If you compare the prices of the upgrade and full versions Windows XP Home Edition to Vista and Windows 7, you'll see that you have to stretch to make connections. The Home Edition prices match the Vista Home Basic prices and the full XP Home Edition price matches the full Windows 7 Home Premium price; however, the upgrade Windows 7 Home Premium price is $10 more than the upgrade XP Home Edition price.

What's your take?

After reading this, what do you think about the Windows 7 pricing structure? As always, if you have comments or information to share about this topic, please take a moment to drop by the TechRepublic Community Forums and let us hear from you.

TechRepublic's Windows Vista and Windows 7 Report newsletter, delivered every Friday, offers tips, news, and scuttlebutt on Vista and Windows 7, including a look at new features in the latest version of the Windows OS. Automatically sign up today!

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

73 comments
jdclyde
jdclyde

http://windows.microsoft.com/systemrequirements [i] If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here's what it takes: * 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor * 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) * 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)[/i] Ok, if this is the same as past MS requirements, I think people are going to have more response issues than Vista gave. Any bets the NEXT MS OS released won't have a 32 bit option because it will take the full 4 gigs just to turn on?

fLaKeYjAkE
fLaKeYjAkE

I got the RC to run with only 386mb of ram and onboard video with active antivirus and zone alarm. reminds me of my old 386 with win95

fLaKeYjAkE
fLaKeYjAkE

How else do you think BG does it? He may not be running the office, but you can bet the profit gouging of the consumer is really what is supporting all of the good deeds in the third world. So just remember, the more you spend for an M$ os, the more you help Bill take care of those who cannot!

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

Real engineers build a bridge and move on. Microsoft wants to re-paint and resell the same old bridge again and again. It has to so it can keep all those buildings and people paid for in the long term. I hope there will come a time when people say enough. Outside of special applications when is fast enough, fast enough. Given the fact that people get practically instant access, almost unlimited storage(I saw a terabyte drive recently) and connectivity around the planet now with a handful of methods from phones to twitter when will enough be enough? It is all about money, creating an unending spiral of more to keep everyone in the industry with a job. But, really when is enough, enough?

rick@Hogans-Systems.com
rick@Hogans-Systems.com

>It's all about money... What is your secret? How do you live without making any money? Don't you have to eat? Or have a place to live? I suppose you must have a windmill to produce electricity to run your computer... but how did you get all that stuff with no money? Oh wait! I bet I know the answer! It's OK for YOU to make money, but it's wrong for anyone else to make money! Is that how it works? >Microsoft wants to re-paint and resell the same old bridge again and again. It has to so it can keep all those buildings and people paid for in the long term. If you had a clue, you'd know that the vast majority of people only buy an OS when they buy a new computer. If everyone was as stupid as you are, MS could just keep selling Windows 3.1 and they could just keep making money without spending a dime to develop anything new. If everyone was satisfied to keep buying new computers with the same old OS on them, there'd be no reason for MS to spend money on developing new software. The problem is that there are some of us in the world who need new features, like 64 bit capability, etc. There are some of us who like new "bells and whistles" too. No one said you have to upgrade. You can keep your old 286 computer with Windows 3.1 and use that for the rest of your life. No one will stop you. Rick

1bn0
1bn0

mikifinaz1 is, they would keep buying the same old repainted bridge again and agan and agina......Oh .. wait a minute. Time for you to leave the computer room and work with a regular desktop like the users you support do. Vista was nothing more than a bunch of after market add-ons and a new coat of paint. All the extra weight did was slow down the car and increase the fuel consumption. Windows 95 was significant change from 3.1(1). XP was a decent improvement but they couldn't resist adding useless bling anyway. Vista was successfull attempt to replicate the complete failure of ME. Thats the only thing that gives me hope for Windows 7. Microsoft has to fail completely every once in a while to get back on track.

rick@Hogans-Systems.com
rick@Hogans-Systems.com

I haven't been in a computer room in years. I work on a "regular desktop" computer every day. Just because you don't understand the value of the enhancements in Vista, like full support for 64 bit mode; easier, more reliable networking; more convenient navigation through Windows Explorer; far better security; and so on, doesn't mean that these enhancements don't exist or aren't valuable to some of us. You probably don't understand how your digestive system digests the food you eat, but that doesn't mean being able to digest food is not important. Vista was strictly a MARKETING failure, not a technical failure. It had a few glitches when it first came out, but after a few updates, and after 3rd party vendors came up with drivers for their hardware, Vista has been rock solid and a great performer. Just try to remember: The fact that you don't understand something doesn't mean that it doesn't exist or isn't useful. It just means that you don't understand it. Rick

semco72057
semco72057

I have been a user of MS products since MS-Dos 6.0 and Windows 3.0 and have invested plenty of money for products which didn't work as advertised. Vista is an example which crashes as much as 98.I will be waiting to see what the critics say about Win 7 before even considering buying it. Instead, I am looking at progress with Googles new OS and hope it will work.

ProfQuill
ProfQuill

The price was never $49, it was a penny short of $50. If you're going to round out the pennies, please do it correctly. The whole 99 cent thing is a pet peeve of mine, where marketeers prey on stupid people who believe that 99 cents is zero. That being said, I ordered my $50 (minus 1 cent) Win 7 from Amazon, free shipping, no tax, not billed until ship, can cancel if I change my mind. What's not to like? I believe Microsoft has pulled off a marketing coup here (in a good way), offering up Win7 as shareware, getting early adopters to like what seems to be a good product, giving them the choice of going back to Vista/XP next year or saving big time by ordering now. I have to wonder if there will be another round of incentives.

bratwizard
bratwizard

Windows jumped the shark a long time ago. Microsoft is good at arm-twisting marketing but it stopped innovating decades ago. The most memorable feature of Windows? Genuine Protection-- windows phone home ALL THE FRICKIN TIME! So how about one last call-- so long, and no thanks, no more fish.

OregonLighthouse
OregonLighthouse

I kept XP Pro on my home setup as long as I could, until I ran across some software I needed to run that was Vista-only. I still kept XP on my main system, and only ran Vista on that one sysem. Of course, with MS trying to limit updates on XP, it won't be long before they force everyone to switch, like they did from 95 to 98 or from 98 to XP. After working in a MS shop where the entire division went Vista, and seeing the headaches caused by it compared to the already-headache-prone XP, I wasn't about to switch my home systems until I had to. At this point, I'll try Windows 7 on a test box for about a year, before I migrate. The Vista system I'm running consistently hogs memory, everything runs slower than XP, and all the other usual gripes. As I said, after Vista, MS should pay all of it's XP holdouts like me and current Vista users who didn't have a choice to take Windows 7 off their hands. If it's as good as they say it is, then maybe by the time Windows 8 comes out, I'll be ready to buy it again. Till then, I'm sticking to XP till I don't have any other choice.

lordazoth
lordazoth

To start off I have XP running on work laptop and Debian on desktop and honestly I am doing more on the linux box then I am on the laptop. Setting up the linux was a lot easier and faster then the usual windoze install (except had a couple of quick Win7 RC installs) and also once the few updates were installed the linux was more secure then the laptop ever was. What the linux world needs to do is getting behind a few major distros and push them to standardise the core features and application distrubtion. We still need to give the option for the lesser knowns to try and make their mark.

mhunter392
mhunter392

People, have we not learned from Microsoft's past mistakes ? Buying an "Upgrade" OS brings along the faults of the previous OS and some features in the older OS will conflict with features in the newer OS. Buying an OS before the full version has been released is idiotic. Look at Vista for 1 example. Look at MS's past when the pre-release OS had features that were removed when the full version was finally released. For you home users and hackers, knock yourself out "playing" at computers. In the business world, we do due diligence, and do not jump on the bleeding edge bandwagon. We have to ensure continuity of operations and if we don't, we could severely hurt a corporation's operations.

geekynerd
geekynerd

I'll drink to that! I'm willing to bet that all you Vista haters are the ones who originally said that MS is the best and bought Vista the second it came out, now because of that you all hate it. For people who enjoy Windows now, don't screw it up by buying Win7 the second it's released, even if there are 'amazing sales' going on, wait for other people to try it and make sure its stable. As for MS having a habit, Win2K did some good after Win 9x, so maybe 7 will be the upgraded 2k after XP and Vista.

gadjet
gadjet

based on the previous behavior of microsoft in releasing substandard software that takes years to get the bugs out and many many "service" paks and upgrades. As consumers let's all get together and NOT! NOT buy into the ridiculous and insane practice. NOT buy any, until the damn thing is complete five or six years down the road! I remember part of a quote about repeating the same mistake and expecting different results being insane, are we not all repeating the same mistake.

z111sc
z111sc

The most interesting point will be how to get WinXp users directly to Win 7. Haven't seen that yet. If that doesn't happen, expect the market for alternate OS's to explode. Personally, Win Xp works. Win 7 doesn't give me much as far as tangible, measureable improvements. Maybe I'll wait till Win 8 or Win 9.

maclovin
maclovin

Mac OS X Single User: $129 Family Pack: $199 Upgrade from Leopard to Snow Leopard: $29 ...Having a Mac: Priceless No restrictions on any of them. 'Nuff said.

JamesRL
JamesRL

...when the Mac OS was free. In fact you could walk into any dealership with blank diskettes and they would help you make a new set of diskettes for upgrades. They would of course try to sell you more RAM, but thats fair (I've been on both sides). When I worked at a large organization this made rollout decisions much easier. Planning a rollout to 20,000 Macs is easier when the cost for licenses is zero. James

walkerc
walkerc

You do know that by buying a mac you are spending thousands dollars more on the pc to begin with? Plus their OS's only work with certain hardware and is based on open source. At least windows dev actually develop their code instead of passing off the OS community work as their own.

1bn0
1bn0

You do know that by buying a mac you are spending thousands of hours actually getting things done than thousands of hours tryingto get the parts to all work together to begin with? I have spent a long time using and hating Windows but I can't agree with trashing the price of Mac hardware. You get what you pay for and Apple makes good Hardware. Microsoft needs to rethink their current ad company right out of existance before Apple decides to start selling Windows computers. "Want a Mac but the company says you have to have Windows. Well you CAN have your cake and eat it too. Introducing the ALL NEW Apple P.C." I'd like to try Windows on Mac hardware. I bet it would be the best Windows machine I ever used.

rick@Hogans-Systems.com
rick@Hogans-Systems.com

In my experience, I have seen way too many people buy a dirt-cheap PC and then complain about how slow Windows is, or how unreliable Windows is. They just don't seem to understand that junk hardware is going make a computer run like junk, regardless of what OS is running on it. Meanwhile, I sit here with my custom-built computers that I built using the best motherboards, the best RAM, etc. And these computers run Windows perfectly. Good hardware is more reliable, more stable and runs faster, too. Rick

djackson
djackson

If you match Feature for feature and spec for Spec MAC and PCs are the same price with in a few hundred dollars. Then check the difference in ease of use.

kendinh
kendinh

MS charge too much for their OS. I would switch to open source. ubuntu, suse linux, fedora, redhat and few other flavor, or MAC. If you just sufr the net and email you don't have to use MS OS. Screw MS profuct.

akita96th
akita96th

Well if your a programmer or IT specialist these OS systems are ok for you but if you are just a regular Joe then these OS systems can be a nightmare to use trying to configure it for what ever software your are trying to install.

andrew.glenda
andrew.glenda

I've been offered a deal but it seems to be the same price in ? sterling as you are quoting in $ dollars

squirrelpie0
squirrelpie0

All bitching about the price, but nobody willing to switch. As for Mac compatability, just try sticking many USB thumb drives into a Mac, particularly an older one. Stay XP, or stay home. Go Linux

tiredoftechrepublic
tiredoftechrepublic

Microsoft keeps bringing out new and supposedly improved OS's every three years or so... If I sold a product (especially for the amount they ask) that had to be 'fixed' (updated) every week, I probably wouldn't have many takers. What I would like M$ to do is build an OS that works! Crap on fixing the thing every week... come on, enough is enough. Go Linux!

plainbroke
plainbroke

I support a lot of different OS the biggest problem I run into is a Mac, they do not play well with others, IE Konica Minolta Copier/Printer/Scanner, Good luck. Especially if the customer wants to use account tracking or authentication. The MAC will take days to figure out where they hid the drop down you need then another to translate it to what we all are used to seeing. I may be a little biased because they give me so much grief. Just my 2 cents worth..

rick@Hogans-Systems.com
rick@Hogans-Systems.com

It seems like any topic of discussion that comes up on any of these types of forums always has to turn into some kind of a "my OS is better than your OS" debate. My feeling is that there must be a lot of children who just come here for the sake of starting these kinds of stupid arguments. Rick

MKleinpaste
MKleinpaste

AD integration - Usually AD authentication failure is due to misconfiguration in the Directory Utility. If Directory Utility is too hard try Likewise or Centrify. They simplify extending the AD schema to support computer policy on Macs/Unix/Linux/Solaris, etc. making it a FULL member of the domain. Keychain issues - The only problems I've seen with it are people forgetting their keychain password. How is the keychain affecting printing? Password notice - Password policy is at the computer level in LDAP/AD/OD not at the user level. So using Directory Utility won't force password changes and therefore won't present change messages. In order to apply computer policy you need to extend the AD schema or use an OD Master in "The Magic Triangle" configuration. Either get Likewise ent. or Centrify for computer policy for doing this in AD. I prefer an OD master to manage Mac preferences with AD managing users authentication ("Magic Triangle"). Imaging tools - I hope you're kidding! Besides the built in ASR, NetBoot Server and System Image Utility (download from Apple with the Server Management tools and comes with OS X Server), there's Radmin, Carbon Copy Cloner, NetRestore (deprecated but still works), DeployStudio just to get started. I can deploy X number of laptops, workstations and even servers without getting up from my chair by streaming the images to the network. Then use Apple Remote Desktop to select the systems I want to image and tell them which one to use. Because of Apple's hardware control I can take an image from the latest Mac with all the bells and whistles and deploy them across networks and subnets with minimal effort (especially when compared to Windows Deployment Services/WAIK). Going on... - It sounds like you need a little more education in what OS X offers. I find this common among Windows Admins. I'd suggest the Peachpit Press Apple Training Series for the ASCA certification. http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Training-Mac-Deployment-v10-5/dp/032150268X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247843668&sr=8-2 Careful though. You'll get hooked. I'm a certified Windows/*nix admin. After getting to know the *nix that is OS X, I wish the world hadn't wasted so many years with Winblows. It can do WAY more than Microshaft wants you to know.

ksec2960
ksec2960

I don't normally get involved in disputes over operating systems since it comes down to what work best for you. I have used MAC and PC both for over 15 years. Both have there merits. I also use Unbuntu/Linux on a work laptop. Also has it merits. I have had my fair share of problems with all three. So why does a discussion about pricing for Windows OS end up in a war over which is better.

Lance1313
Lance1313

Active Directory headaches galore... keychain issues connecting to print servers, 0 notice capability's when the passwords are to expire, lack of viable imaging tools for large scale, I could go on and on... I've been integrating them into our system successfully... but there is alot that i wish was diffrent.

tiredoftechrepublic
tiredoftechrepublic

Installation of a Savin MFU at a clients office. Took several days of research to interface with it. (What would take about ten minutes with a PC) Then more time involved in setting up share and folder permissions. I support at least one hundred businesses and only 2 people have Mac's. Like I said, they are not popular for business computers. Graphics they do well, though.

csmith.kaze
csmith.kaze

I own a mac, and have to say... haven't had a problem. Do you have any examples?

tiredoftechrepublic
tiredoftechrepublic

Ever try to network a Mac? Real fun... Mac needs to streamline their network interface before they can be considered a business tool. (They are better for graphics, but crappy for LAN's. Go Linux!

fevensen
fevensen

In my opinion, Microsoft should have offered a special deal to all users (and businesses) that took the leap of faith with Vista. Simply a discounted offer for Windows 7 for anyone holding a valid license for Vista. Anyway, I just pre-ordered Windows 7 from Amazon. Here in Europe, the special offer started on July 15th. Pricing: UK 45 GBP, Germany 50 EUR. Since I live in Switzerland I would normally have ordered from Germany, but they only offered the German version. Ideally I would have taken the US deal, but Amazon US had a non-oversea shipping restriction...

mypl8s4u2
mypl8s4u2

Pricing is one thing, how well does it fare? Vista was a nightmare like MS ME to which both were unsupported almost the same time they came out. And it's reported that Windows 7 is just Vista Revisited. Mind you, maybe they worked out the bugs and annoyances from Vista, and slapped Windows 7 coverings on those packages and sent them out. I'm a bit fed up with the constant updates which tend to break more things then it fixes. And here's the funny part. The beta usually tends to fare better then the commercial version offered. For the time being, I'll keep my eyes open and my wallet shut.

alfred.nims
alfred.nims

My family of 4, including 2 teenagers have been using Vista Ultimate on 4 laptops and 2 desktops without issue once manufacturers finally decided to put out drivers for their products. These guys had the code long before Vista came out but they decided to make you buy their new printer and cameras, etc. to boost their profits. This is not an MS problem. The company I work for, after extensive testing has been deploying Vista and Server 2008 to 16 offices in 7 countries.

tommorrongiello
tommorrongiello

It's all a nuisance... the best operating system should be offered at the lowest price (allowing reasonable profit to the manufacturers). You inevitably want to use software that requires the upper-tier O/S... and most new computers include the lower tier O/S in their price. Yup, you bought two O/S's... maybe a discount for "upgrade". Who wants to "restore" a computer to factory-fresh (factory-bloated) before installing an upgrade? On another note... why is IE 8 doing "for me" that makes it so S L O W ? And, how does it determine where a newly-opened tab will appear in the row of tabs? P.S.: The Apple O/S comes in one flavor (well, maybe there's a server version too).

Barc777
Barc777

Pretty sure that a new (blank) tab opens at the end (right side) of the row of tabs. However, if you right-click a link and choose to open in a new tab, it will be created to the right of the tab you're in.

geekynerd
geekynerd

IE 8 comes with a new thing called 'grouped tabs' while you are correct about blank ones, if you open a link it will open on the right side of the last tab in the group. So for example if you have ten tabs open, five researching on google and five on yahoo, one group will be blue and the other yellow (colors are random) and you open a new link on google in a new tab then it will open right before the yahoo page, at the end of the google group. While you can turn grouping on or off, default is on and I never bothered to change it so I have no clue if it affects the tab opening.

mypl8s4u2
mypl8s4u2

You can't compare a PC to a MAC. There is only 'one' MAC and therefore only one standard. Any MAC product will work with MAC. No question about it. But the PC has many different manufacturers, many different parts made by many different companies around the world, and many are not compatible with each other. MS must maintain separate OS's per manufacturer. A DELL restore CD will not work on an IBM, or a Gateway, or a Toshiba. But a MAC OSX-10.X will work across the board on other MACs. The only difference is the compliment of the MAC receiving such software. On a MAC there comes a time when the latest OS-X won't work on the type of MAC you have forcing you to buy newer hardware like a new Desktop system, or Notebook. Not so with the PC. You can still run XP on a 486 machine with at least 1gig ram. Mind you, it will be slow but it will run. The advantage MAC has is it's compatibility to other products. But what people fail to understand is that a MAC product has no competition from other vendors. Mac is Mac.

geekynerd
geekynerd

I have installed XP on several machines using a Dell Restore CD, most of the machines were custom made and some on even eMachine, the install works fine although you get into a sticky situation when trying to Activate but all you do is buy a product key online and change it in the system, works great and I don't have to go running around looking for setup files. As for MAC, talk about overpriced....

straightlineeng
straightlineeng

Is the SATA address the same, Is the KEYBOARD port address the same, is the VIDEO address the same, are the COM port adress the same ? The BIOS control the addresses. The OS get them from there. Who cares what the MOBO is, AMD or INTEL, no dif. Where is the problem ? If Dell wants custom, let them pay for it, not everybody else. DELL does not even know what their own hardware will expand to. (dangling participle) OEMer.

Terabyte Computer
Terabyte Computer

I believe you're mistaken when you say that "MS must maintain separate OS's per manufacturer". Sure, a Dell restore CD won't work on another brand computer. That's not because MS makes them different, it's because Dell customizes the CD for their hardware. I can use an OEM XP CD on any brand computer. The drivers are what make it unique to the system, not the OS. It's up to the hardware manufacturer to supply the various drivers, which at times are not compatable with other hardware drivers. Disregarding that, you're comments about comparing PC to MAC are on target.

alfred.nims
alfred.nims

I agree wholehearttedly with you and G-man. Also if Microsoft started to make their own hardware and you could only get Win7 when you buy their computer there would be all kinds of antitrust suits. But Mac gets away with it.

ID.10.T
ID.10.T

Cool PROPRIETARY works for Apple. UNCOOL PROPRIETARY didn't work for IBM or HP. I'm NOT a MAC person by the way. Never owned one. But I must admit, Apple has innovative stuff. Brother Dave Gardner once said, "Even though you may live in the wilderness, if you develop a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door....BUT ADVERTISING HELPS!"

alfred.nims
alfred.nims

What PC parts does MS make? Remember this is a comparison between the Mac OS and the Windows OS. As stated before Microsoft does not make the hardware that runs their OS that is why they also are not responsible for the thousands of drivers the other manufacturers come out with. Also remember if you are using Windows 7 it is not the final release. Things that don't work now may work on final release, conversely things that work now may not work later.

master0fpuppets
master0fpuppets

I've got Microsoft hardware, and the sickest part is - they say it will NOT be compatible with Windows 7, at all. Anyone want to try to explain that one? *blinks*

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

yeah, like the best cars, internet access, food products, holidays....dream on!

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