Hardware

Poll: Are you looking forward to the next generation of CPU-OS combinations?

So far on the operating system front, 2011 has been about major changes in the established combinations of CPU and OS. Are you looking forward to dealing with the changes?

Announcements and press releases from the first two months of 2011 indicate that we are in for some significant changes in long-established CPU/operating system combinations.

Plenty of buzz from the 2011 CES was generated by the combination of the latest NVIDIA Tegra chip set and Android Honeycomb operating system for next-generation tablets and mobile devices.

And not too long after that, Microsoft revealed that Windows 8 will work not only with Intel and AMD processors but with ARM processors too.

All these companies, and a multitude of others, are vying for position in the expanding mobile device, tablet, and notebook space. For the IT professional charged with making purchasing decisions, this is likely going to make life more complicated. Even if one assumes that the increased competition will mean better products available for less cost, there still will be a price to pay in terms of the decision-making process.

So, the poll question for the week is: Are you looking forward to the next generation of CPU/OS combinations? Will the new combinations of chips and operating systems mean greater flexibility or just a greater number of headaches?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

5 comments
sboverie
sboverie like.author.displayName 1 Like

I would prefer to see new approaches to hardware and OS. The new releases of OS tend to demand more memory and fast processor speeds but also maintain a backwards compatibility with the old. I would like to see a more powerful OS that has enough intelligence to protect itself from attacks and one that can actually repair itself.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone like.author.displayName 1 Like

Remember a couple of years ago, when some creative hackers developed ways to use the GPU to speed up password cracking? They harnessed a non-windows non-intel processor to make the process run faster. We could debates the merits of that particular application, but it demonstrates that there is more to computing than just "Wintel", and I for one am anxious to see what the future may hold.

l_creech
l_creech like.author.displayName 1 Like

Is a good thing to have when putting forth a proposal to a client. Having more hardware/software combinations is going to give all of us more choices, which means we willbe better able to create solutions that work for ourselves and our clients in a cost effective manner. I can se it being a double edged sword though if not executed properly.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Expand on your poll answer. Why (or why not) are you looking forward to the next generation of CPU/OS combinations? Will the new combinations of chips and operating systems mean greater flexibility or just a greater number of headaches?

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