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Poll: Has Microsoft become a serious contender in video-editing tools?

The TechRepublic Microsoft Windows Blog polls members on this question: Has Microsoft become a serious contender in video editing tools?

As the duly appointed and designated host of the TechRepublic Microsoft Windows Blog, I am tasked with trying to keep up with the news that swirls around Microsoft practically every day. Recently, there was a press release/conference/story about a new development project called Silverlight Rough Cut Editor (RCE). RCE is a browser-based video editor. Quoting from the RCE download Web site on MSDN:

"Silverlight Rough Cut Editor (RCE) simplifies the editing and publishing process, enabling real-time, browser-based video editing, and providing the ability for publishers to improve collaboration, manage dynamic metadata and deliver exciting content to the Web.

RCE provides media organizations with a lightweight, Web-based tool that editors anywhere can use to assemble and edit video, audio, images, and XAML overlays with time code accurate control."

There are a couple of interesting points to note: 1) Silverlight Rough Cut Editor is a free download, and 2) the technology was used by NBC for the Winter Olympics, so it seems to actually work and work well. But the question I would like to consider is whether RCE will be widely adopted.

A quick and dirty Google search, "browser-based video editing," reveals a multitude of choices besides RCE. Does Microsoft have the gravitas in the video-editing tool and development space to separate RCE from the rest of the pack? What do you think? Take the poll and then join the discussion to tell us why or why not. And if you have downloaded and tried RCE gives us your impression -- how well does it work?

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

6 comments
jfreedle2
jfreedle2

I avoid tools that are hosted by a browser. I want real applications and that means that they run in the host operating system as a stand alone application. It also means that it does not require access to the internet to function. We need more tools like that rather than tools hosted in a web browser that require access to the internet in order to function.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

How do you edit video? Do you use a browser-based tool? Have you tried Silverlight Rough Cut Editor?

blackepyon01
blackepyon01

That's my problem with cloud apps in general. If the internet is down for whatever reason, you're screwed. My school has switched to a cloud based app for classroom and marks tracking. And since switching to it, the internet has been down several times for whatever reason. Unfortunately, the entire province is using this app now, so we can't just switch back. We are now at the mercy of the internet. And as usual, they all come rushing to me at once when they discover the internet is down.

Hazydave
Hazydave

Ok, there are some things that make sense in a web browser. And some things that are even borderline acceptable. But video editing? Seriously? I edit video on a Quad-Core PC with dual 1920x1200 monitors, 3TB internal and an 8TB RAID. I use 64-bit Sony Vegas Pro for basic editing, Boris FX for effects, Photoshop for work on stills, Acid and Sonar for backing tracks when needed, etc. I'm going to get all that on the Web? Let's just take video... I've got 1080/60i at 24Mb/s or 1080/60p at 28Mb/s... how's that going from my browser to the cloud and back at acceptable editing speeds? And it's not just one video stream... I'm usually editing from 2-3 cameras at the same time. Video is one of the most CPU and graphics intensive jobs left on a computer. If you could magically transfer my final edit to a big server farm for rendering into MPEG-2/DVD and AVD/BD and maybe some web streaming formats all super-fast, sure, I'll have that. Only problem is, I can create all that stuff here far faster than I can schlep the raw video up to your server farm, much less get the results back. And at some point, that giant sucking sound you hear from all that video being rendered will have a price tag attached. No thanks... video editing needs to be local.

Realvdude
Realvdude

It appears to mainly be for web content editing, which is what it looks like it's role at the Olympics was. Looking at the install guide, it also doesn't appear to be a standalone editor either. I'll probably check it out on a virtual PC, though I don't see it replacing my Adobe Premiere for full feature editing and DVD authoring.

gcomputeronet
gcomputeronet

In your case, you won't need this anyway. But this would run locally in your browser (once you hit the website and download the Silverlight file (like a Flash video)). So it will use your CPU and Graphics card, though it might be faster when IE9 gets out.