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Poll: Is the announced partnership with Nokia a good deal for Microsoft?

The TechRepublic Windows Blog member poll question of the week: Is the announced partnership with Nokia a good deal for Microsoft?

On February 11, 2011, in a joint press release, Microsoft and Nokia announced that the companies were going to be partners in the mobile phone and device market. Essentially, what this means is that Nokia hardware is going to feature the Windows Phone 7 operating system. Of course, the press release used more glowing language and emphasized the buzz term "mobile ecosystem."

Now, I have no problem with the partnership; in fact, I think it was an excellent strategic move by Microsoft. They get their Windows Phone 7 operating system on more hardware and immediately get more international exposure and access to a larger market. The move makes perfect sense for Microsoft.

As for Nokia, well, I think Jason Hiner made some valid points about their strategy in his Tech Sanity Check blog post. The move constricts Nokia from what is likely to be the largest platform for mobile devices for years to come, Android. I think a better strategy for Nokia would have been to remain agnostic about the operating system. It seems to me that hardware is where Nokia should be concentrating their resources.

But what do you think? Is the Nokia and Microsoft partnership a good move for both companies? Is there really hope for their mobile ecosystem or are the established ecosystems of Apple and Android too far ahead?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

13 comments
kolotyluk
kolotyluk

Having Nokia in the same room as Microsoft is like having President Obama in the same room as Bill Clinton's brother Roger - it looks great for Roger, but terrible for Barack. Microsoft are desperate to get back into the mobile game after being devastated by the iPhone and now Android. I can only hope that Microsoft is paying Nokia a huge wad of cash for debasing themselves so much.

raoven_mca
raoven_mca

Nokia should have invested for thier Mobile OS. What about current Symbian Mobile users? They can't hope for any advanced features in thier mobile(s) any more, i think.

Peter Sanders
Peter Sanders

WIth Nokia's lack of "iPhoneness" or "Androidness" the Nokia OS is lagging. Sure Nokia could rewrite its own OS to be more like the others, but why should it do that now. Nokia needed to be on the ball NOW with its new (own) OS. It's too late to start now, so the next best thing would be to jump on the "free" Android OS bandwagon. Windows moible is never going to be the best mobile OS. Typical of MS, they keep trying but after numerous versions they are still way behind Apples smooth iPhone. To be honest MS are just not in the same league. Having been a user of several MS Windows mobile OSs on PDAs I have had the convenience of what was on offer at the time, but was never really satisfied. Too slow, too prone to crashes etc. The iPhone has it all over Windows Mobile, but I have never really been a fan of Apple's methodology or ideals (they are good for those that like Apple). As you might glean from my comments I am an Android fan, I waited a long time before changing my SE w810i mobile phone. The wait was worth it :) An HTC Desire HD does it for me. iPhone like perhaps, but it is slick very functional and it WORKS. I just can't expect Windows Mobile 7 to be this good and this RELIABLE. Look at the latest WIndows mobile OS, the phones (main screen) only use the left two thirds of the screen for apps/widgets. I do think that MS is looking for a quick fix to a LARGE market. I anticipate that this move, this partnership with Nokia is strictly for MSs benefit. I see this as a limit on Nokia's future if they become restricted to WIndows x Mobile. Windows mobile is losing market share, Nokia's Symbian is losing market share. The partnership may boost each others sales for a while, but Apple and Android are the future in phone OSs. I believe Nokia's future would be MUCH better with Android. Rgds Peter

TBBrick
TBBrick

Nokia made it's name by making cool and reliable phones that would work on a variety of providers networks. Locking themselves into to one operating system is bad enough, but the worst one of the lot!?! Dumb Nokia, very dumb.

wdyson1
wdyson1

With all the power and storage available on phone and tablets today; why not synergize a duel boot tablet or phone. Windows 7 and Android both available at start up, true Telecommuter heaven. Microsoft could leverage the fact that Windows is very popular system for data storage and office tools. Since on PC???s Microsoft is still popular they could benefit giving user???s full access to all of the power and ability in their home or office computer. Beyond Citrix a full power access remote and local. If such a duel boot system could make all local files accessible from both systems for emailing and reading etc that would be a huge bonus. It seems they could have the first Windows/Android full power all in one tablet/phone for telecommuters to have everything in one unit. It would be great to have all the connectivity and features of both systems in one device. PC power and at the same time being able to use free Android apps for business and leisure time could make it the ultimate toy and work tool. Add to that Xbox and PC styling gaming. How sexy would that be? Free or for cash could distinguish real quality of games. I know I would buy it, if it worked. If real difference in value isn???t introduced, a new version of the old scene will become just that same old song and dance. Who needs that? I think there is opportunity for new with this partnership, but who knows if they will take it.

dhays
dhays

I have no opinion. It makes no difference to me. Until such time that all phones are avaialble for all carriers, who really cares? I don't plan on giving up my carrier for anyone's phone not carried by them. I am not a platform junkie, I like the prices of services provided by my carrier, and rarely have connection problems, one big exception is inside of Wal*Mart or Ssm's Clubs--little to no reception, no problem in most other retailer's buildings.

blarman
blarman

I can't see this as being anything other than a desperately stupid move by Nokia, and a brilliant strategy by Microsoft. What does Nokia win by teaming with Microsoft? Cash. That's it. No market leverage, no market position. In fact, they give up what market position they had by embracing bottom-of-the-barrel Windows for their phones. On the other side, Microsoft gets a competent hardware manufacturer that can help them out with Xbox (remember all those disastrous problems with overheating) and provide them a decent hardware platform for the phones. And if Nokia folds, Microsoft will be in perfect position to acquire them.

saturno
saturno

I think that the toughest question is the other way around. Is this partnership good for Nokia? IMO, Microsoft has anything to lose embracing Nokia hardware. They can't have - Nokia is still the largest manufacturer in the world. Their hardware is proven to be good. My feeling is that Nokia might be already loosing costumers mainly to the Android market. The former Windows Mobile, now Windows Phone 7 software manufacturer have nothing really good to add to Nokia. If Windows Mobile was not so good, the rushed delivery of Windows Phone 7 didn't bring and *solid* reason for costumers to change or even maintain the platform on their personal phones/PDA. For now, I really consider that this might be a shot in the foot for Nokia, but that's just me thinking loud.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Is the Nokia and Microsoft partnership a good move for both companies? Is there really hope for their mobile ecosystem or are the established ecosystems of Apple and Android too far ahead?

bpecht
bpecht

Think this is the more likely scenario.. Nokia just does not get the mobile market right now, and by putting the Windows Mobil platform on their 'smart phones' will certainly doom them. But, I also think that any takeover by MS of Nokia would also be a huge mistake.. MS should use its cash reserves to acquire a manufacturer that has a chance to compete against Android and the Iphone.. and the only one I can see is RIMM.. JMHO!

Dukhalion
Dukhalion

It was not at all a "move by Nokia". It was a clearcut takeover by Microsoft thru Elop. Nokias previous chairman would never have accepted this. I know, I live in the same country, very close to Nokia.

Juanita Marquez
Juanita Marquez

I think the average non-techie person doesn't even know who Nokia is, and unfortunately in the US Nokia has received little respect even from those in the tech industry who have voices and should know better *coughLaporteDvorakcough*. Nokia had better functionality and performance than iPhones long before iPhones took over the US market. I have been a Nokia user for a long time and look forward to the increased exposure MS can ignite for them, and even though I agree that going Android might be better in the long run for them, you never know how a market will turn. HP initially thought making printers was a silly idea, but someone had the vision to make that aspect of their company a leader in the marketplace.

Hazydave
Hazydave

Certainly, there's some of the ecosystem here. MS has their clone of iTunes and the iTunes store already established. Unlike Nokia (who were very late wit the Ovi Stoore, and even then only offered it on select devices), MS knew this was a mandatory component, it remains to be seen if they'll still require PC tethering (by cable or wifi), or willnot require the PC at all, as Android. The real question, though, will be tablets. Unless those prove a fad this year, they will rremain a key component of every other mobile device ecosystem (HP and RIM, too). But MS says Windows is for tablets, despite its current unsuitability (too big, touchscreens need a stylus, apps expect much faster CPUs). Should be interesting to see if MS is in for the whole thing, or let's their usual PC-centrism torpedo this ecosystem.

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