Windows optimize

Poll results: Hello Windows 7 and goodbye Windows XP

In December 2009, Mark Kaelin polled TechRepublic members about their plans for Microsoft Windows 7, here are the results.

In December 2009, I published a blog post, "Hello Windows 7 and Goodbye Windows XP? asking TechRepublic members what they were thinking regarding Microsoft Windows 7 and the potential for migrating from Windows XP. The results indicate that, despite the general acceptance of Windows 7 as a viable operating system, most enterprises were still waiting for a catalyst to drive the upgrade process.

Whatever else you can say about Windows XP, it has to be conceded that this venerable operating system has staying power. Take a look at the results and see where you fit in with your IT peers. Are you out in front of the curve this time?

Total votes: 2,824
Total votes: 2,655
Total votes: 2,547

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

21 comments
Slayer_
Slayer_

When my XP install gets bloated up and dies from a virus or Malware, I'll get Windows 7. If it survives to Windows 8, I'll get windows 8, and so on.

yakupm
yakupm

given that your own conclusion and data indicate XP will be around for a while: "Whatever else you can say about Windows XP, it has to be conceded that this venerable operating system has staying power."

Rob C
Rob C

They would only upgrade if it was really necessary. If MS played fair, then it would not be necessary. If MS was not making it near impossible to buy new computers with XP installed, then there would be NO FINANCIAL INCENTIVE TO UPGRADE. They would have much better uses for their IT budget Many MS Office upgrades were also forced on organizations, to be able to easily deal with customers/organizations that were sending the new flippin format to them.

fw32
fw32

"In December 2009, I published a blog post, ?Hello Windows 7 and Goodbye Windows XP? asking TechRepublic members what they were thinking regarding Microsoft Windows 7 and the potential for migrating from Windows XP" - more confusing than the title which is succinct. Are the poll responders only those who have tried W7 and then decided as the pie chart labels imply, or is it does it include those who detest new W/OS and the SP quandry? I see no rush to W7 in this data.

maclovin
maclovin

Please re-read the results of your own polls cited here. How can you put a title like that when the majority answered "ONLY when we absolutely have to..." in their timeframe response? Some insight would be helpful to understand your title and insinuation that this somehow means people are running to buy Windows 7, in its current state, to replace their XP installations! Many programs are proprietary, and if you haven't switched yet, many developers don't have what they need to test or migrate their programs to the new platform.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

Same-old Same-old with MS OS - they never get it right the first time. Wait until after SP1, when SP2 is on the near horizon, and you'll have a lot less problems with it. The cycle has been historic since Win-95, Win-98, 98SE, 2000, XP - and now Win-7. By the time SP2 is released, Win-7 will be solid. Until then, we'll wait if we can.

psprint
psprint

I will stay XP as long as I can. The cost of updating out equipment is outragious in this ecomonity, plus the incomvenience.

carlsf
carlsf

We (115) will NOT be moving to WIN7 or Office2007-2010 REASONS..... WIN7 MS have done away with the "CLASSIC" option, which is standard setting on our systems (XP and VISTA) Office 2007-2010 the hated "RIBBON" interface. We will be staying with XP and VISTA and Office 2003. We will be using the DOWNGRADE to roll back from WIN7, and use our Office 2003 install in new systems purchased.

mike
mike

I tested 7 since its infancy and was extremely pleased with it but from a technical standpoint, it is VISTA and the core is unchanged and we are forced to live with a vista core from the desktop all the way to the server/s. I never liked Linux (from 11/12 years ago) but i have begun loading and testing linux desktops (debian)/ servers (apache /samba)and after the initial stage fright, I have seen the writing on the wall. These applications are the same they were 12 years ago except more and more people have added the "always been missing drivers" to run the apps we are so used to. Cannot deny the long lasting and hardness of the O/S's and if i could put up with Unix and DOS from 20/30 years ago (as well as cisco and some others who use unix flavors), these open sources will definitle move into mainstream as econmy continues on its path and our jobs and livelihood will be based on it. I would rather have a higher salary or charges then sweeter equipment / software

guidedogct
guidedogct

I think the question mark comes into play to show that this is meant as a query, rather than an insinuation.

Jessie
Jessie

The pie chart indicates that 36% are waiting until they absolutely cannot wait any longer, while the other 64% have a plan and a deployment schedule. Granted 36% is the largest single group, but they are not the majority.

windowsmt60
windowsmt60

Will never upgrade on first release. I always wait until SP2... Even the "best" OS that Microsoft has released for clients is fraught with bugs, even known bugs, but demand by the company C-level to bring to market forces them to release. I think Win7 has promise, vista certainly didn't... But I will still wait until it has a decent track record.

joehroy
joehroy

I have windows 7 on an older emachine and are experiencing typical microsoft headaches. I cannot use the computer on my home network. I contacted microsoft andafter a week of try this and try that the gave up trying to fix the problem. After owning the windows operating system for a month, I am getting used to the lovely shade of blue it turns when I try to access it across the network. I think it is one of the new window 7 features. My 7 year old Dell laptop died and I bought another Dell laptop with windows 7 and it displays the same lovely shade of blue when accessed from the network. The people got it wrong again, I am switching to open source.

jck
jck

I tried to wait on SP2 before installing a MS OS. Ensures a lot more stability.

2rs
2rs

I have deployed 3 desktops & 3 laptops with Win7 w/XP "downgrade" & reused our previously purchased Office 2003. Just ordered 6 more new desktops with Win7 w/XP & Office 2007. All new systems have hardware requirements needed for conversion to Windows 7 when we ABSOLUTELY have to. I am relieved that MS will continue to support XP SP3 until mid-2014.

akumudzi2
akumudzi2

the 19% + 17% + 5% that will not switch within a year are surely not saying "Hello Windows 7 and goodbye Windows XP"

rodangib
rodangib

After 3 years in my current company, I've convinced management to finally sweep MS into the rubbish bin and adopt Linux. We have 35 desktops now running Ubuntu, and most of our daily operations are web based. we run thunderbird as email client, FF browser, Open Office, and mainly all open source apps. The network protocols are the same as MS (TCP/IP) which we use here, and our voip system. Our servers run (have run from before I joined)Centos and Red Hat, with Apache as our web server software. Our employees are quite happy with their computers running a lot faster, without much clutter, and obviously management is happy as we don't have to pay any more desktop licenses to MS, and they didn't have to hire a Linux expert as I already had the knowledge and for the same wage, the transition was done successfully. Now, this is not recommended for all businesses, fortunately it's worked for us. First see whether MS software is primordial in your operations, and if your staff is change-welcoming, and also, a very important point, if you need to hire a linux expert to help with the transition and further troubleshooting.

urnava
urnava

I will stay with XP as long possible. We no need shiney memory eating OS. W7 is new cloth wearing Vista. Same for Office system also. Things must be easy day after day, but MS make it difficult. I am working as tech in a non IT kompany, but it take me some/more time to find things in W7. Face many problems to connect in wireless network. MS should release a fix verson/release (fix all the current problems) of XP like Apple OS X do. XP rock. (Sorry for bad inglis.)

pgit
pgit

Same here; wherever there is a proprietary app written for windows were out of luck. Totally with desktops and more often than not on servers. I have put in requests to a number of companies that write this stuff, for example a sonogram controlling app, or other hardware control systems, asking for a Linux port. Only once have I gotten a response, and that was "we're in the process of considering [it.]" Most others are silent. I told the authors of one such app, a network based client tracking system, that the client was willing to help fund the porting of it to Linux, and wanted to negotiate it, perhaps getting the final product for free (with support) or a cut of future sales, whatever... They didn't even want to talk. That one I can't figure out other than they really don't care about their product or business. (which other indications say may be the case, it's a 'cash cow' just sitting there undeveloped any further) As for office type docs, open office has come a long way, I rarely see any incompatibilities any more. Just last week I had to rebuild a system for a client that had used corel word perfect 10 for a number of years, but had lost the installation disks. Open office opened the .wpd files fine, and converted them to more compatible .doc without any loss of formatting. Won't be long and Linux will be a perfectly viable alternative for just about any role... minus those pesky windows-only proprietary things, which unfortunately are a huge part of the market.

guidedogct
guidedogct

We used Linux servers and Open Office on workstations as long as we were able - only issues interacting with software programs necessary to the industry limited our ability to use these cost effective alternatives.

pgit
pgit

My success in getting users to adopt Linux has been on a steady slope upward for a couple of years. It'd be nice to have something precipitate an increase of folks at least willing to entertain the idea. Being located in what the Wall Street Journal once dubbed "the buckle of the rust belt" there hasn't been a lot of activity toward win7 among the business I work with. But I look forward to discussing windows licensing, "genuine advantage" and other factors (not just $$$) with folks when the situation arises.