Windows

Poll Results: It is time to face facts and finally dump Windows XP

Mark Kaelin took a stand and declared that the time to dump Windows XP has come. Check out the poll results to see how many of your peers agreed with him.

On March 25, 2011, I made a declarative statement and polled the TechRepublic membership to see how many agreed:

Poll: It is time to face facts and finally dump Windows XP

As I expected, there are still a large number of readers holding steadfastly to the idea that they can continue to use Microsoft Windows XP as the primary operating system for their business indefinitely. In fact, if you read through the subsequent discussion, you can see that there are more than a few readers who are downright hostile to the idea of dumping Windows XP.

While I applaud their determination and tenacity, it is the inevitable fact that eventually Windows XP will not be a feasible operating system for any business. The sooner the 29% of respondents answering the poll with "No, you are crazy, Windows XP forever" can come to grips with that fact, the better off they are going to be.

A simple majority of 53% has either already dumped Windows XP or are currently working on it. That leaves 18% realizing that something has to be done, but finding it difficult to bring it about.

Critical legacy applications and the cost to migrate to a newer operating system were the most often-cited legitimate reasons for staying with XP. Why are you staying with Windows XP? What is the factor tying you to that operating system? Do you have no other options?

Additional resources

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

45 comments
oznbolivia
oznbolivia

I installed Win7 over a week ago and have had nothing but problems. System ran fine until M$ downloaded their updates. I'm a stand alone desk top, no network, just me and my family. Seems like very few of the updates apply to me but they are on and causing problems. How do I get rid of them in Win7? I do not need updates that are for programs that are not installed, or internal network users. I know I have to read each update to see if it is related to my computer. I would have been better to just turn off auto updates! Now that Win 7 is on several changes to programs when reloaded. Guess who has to learn and then teach to very non computer literate people how to re create files such as bookmarks or favorites. Finding files and storing files is different from all other OS's of the past. The games are not the same. The two other users of my computer loves XP games. I put a shortcut on the win7 desktop to the XP games they like. Some time ago I added a hard drive and still have XP on the other HD but it will not run as a stand alone or single HD. I loaded Win7 with the XP Pro drive unplugged. Something in Win 7 Stops the other drive from booting unless both drives are plugged. The win 7 drive when plugged in and booted goes in to BLUE SCREEN dead. Re starts runs its diagnostics, claims to fix the problem but it happens again. Check the drivers, memory, etc all is OK. Win7 may be ok WITHOUT THE UPDATES. I did not get to run it long enough to find out. I may get a chance it learn because I'm on the verge to format the C drive and start all over. It is a lot of bother and work, but may improve the system. OznBolivia

oznbolivia
oznbolivia

My laptop, Toshiba A215 with AMD dual core has Windows 7, but came with VISTA which was not the most liked product MS ever produced. Windows 7 is not that good and was and still is hard to find my way around. My desk top an ACER e360 aspire with AMD dual core. Supplied with XP Media Center 2003, ran real well until I plugged a USB G3.5 modem. I put in a second drive and put XP pro SP2 on it and the modem software ran well. The same soft ware would not run on VISTA. The supplier said go to XP Pro or Windows 7. MS seems not to do enough beta testing and seem to have 10,000 patches, updates etc in the first year, so I waited for SP3 to get it's bugs worked out. A month ago I finally downloaded it because I was having strange problems that restore points were not fixing. New problems and blue screens shutdowns etc. SP3 was a piece of junk. IE 8 would crash very often. I finally reloaded XP Pro sp2 and as anyone that has ever done it all programs need to be reloaded. Worse it mixed up the hard drives so my start drive now is M: and my what was M: is now C which no longer has media Center but a lot of Junk and will not boot. I'm not happy with Windows 7, I now see beta System 8. Can't they get one product correct and stay with it for 10 years? Ive been a MS user when DOS 3.0 was in use and watched the progression move forward but the quality go down. In truth Windows 98 was the most user friendly and stable product they had. Oz

Softedge
Softedge

All latest versions of applications I need to do my work operate without compatibiliity problems. No viruses ever. Connectivity just fine. Explain again the reason to 'upgrade'? Softedge

Heimdall222
Heimdall222

I'm a Win XP wrangler for numerous networked machines. There's enough fun to be had without the headaches of switching to Win 7 (aka Vista SP3). And anyway, why switch to Win 7 when Win 8 is so close to release? "Close" is relative, of course, as Uncle Albert once so famously commented. But still.... Moreover, as we're hearing from the Redmond Wonks, Win 8 is sooooo much better (sarcasm alert!). I hope it is, actually, since MS needs at least two rousing successes to overcome the awful taste left by that Vista nastiness. But...switch to Win 7... now? Why I should poke myself in **both** eyes with sharp sticks? *********** Ummm, fanboyz/fangrrrlz, please spare me the ranting about the virtues of Win 7. I've heard it all and am NOT impressed!

patrickmm97
patrickmm97

During a visit to my newly remodeled local super market a few weeks ago, some brand new self checkout stations were being installed. I saw one of them being booted up and the splash screen clearly was Windows 2000. I guess there still is some life left in that old OS for special apps. I wonder if they are volume licensed or maybe they have a way around it.

Ric_Shanahan
Ric_Shanahan

HALO, the original version and a Microsoft product, is not supported. How dumb is that? MS's fix? Buy a newer version of HALO. D'oh!

dave
dave

IF I could, I would, switch to Linux that is. I've used it and liked it. There is a learning curve for new users, but how about the switch to Windows 3.1 from DOS? The part that irritates me is the steep price to pay for M$ licensing. Anybody have to pay up for new licenses for Windows Server 2008 and M$ $QL Server? The place where I work is going to have to bleed for an upgrade. And as other posters have said, it's a money factor. I would switch the whole office to Linux if it wasn't for applications that run on Windows only.

doctorg13
doctorg13

I work for a small rural school district. We upgrade machines as we are able to. I just removed the last (and only) Windows ME computer last month. We still have 2 or 3 Win 98 SE though and a number of Win 2000. Lack of funds is the main issue with changing to newer OS's. I do find that I have more support problems with the few Windows 7 machines that I do with the XP machines. I even prefer working with the Vista machines over the Windows 7 ones. If I can learn to make the few windows programs that the elementary teachers use in the elementary lab run on wine then Ubuntu will start appearing in the lab.

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

I mean, why change? No one has ever presented me with hard cold figures and facts regarding WHY should I do that? Purchase new hardware to be able to use the Win 7, as my current 512 MB RAM/ 64 MB Video won't do? What for? All my company's doing (and IT IS DOING), can be done with the old software and the old OS (that is not only XP but also 2003 Server, 2000 and even 98SE). For how long will we use it? For as long as we can. Why? Because the ton of money we should use on new hardware, new OS and new application program licenses can be put to much better use somewhere else. Like in the core business for instance. The costs of upgrading ALL our software and hardware (where that is possible of course, since some machines that relate to certain pieces of equipment can NOT be upgraded) will amount (without the necessary courses and learning) to several tens of thousands of dollars. Why would I want to throw that kind of money down the drain? To do what I am already doing, except with another software? Why should I buy a new hammer when the old one is doing an excellent job at hitting the nail? Nope. Not on my turn.

wrye
wrye

Our school district uses programs mandated by the state. Some programs will not work with WIN7 or IE8. Some programs are relics of old DOS based programs. So untill things change at the state level, we are stuck. If I had my say it would be a change to a Linux operating system.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Manufactuters such as HP, Epson and others have already stated that new products may not have any XP support as of this year. Pray that your hardware doesn't die.....

Spitfire_Sysop
Spitfire_Sysop

The agency I work for depends on a web-app that they paid too much for. This web-app requires IE 7 to function. They know that IE 7 doesn't run on Win7 and they also know that they can use XP mode but nobody likes the idea. I believe we have some Licenses for Win7 and there is a standard image ready for deployment but the government moves slowly and deliberately. They are scared. They don't want to break everything and look stupid. Rightly so. A lot of testing is going on and we are moving away from the things that are holding us back. Some things, like the stupid web-app, are hard to get away from when so many different people depend on it for different reasons that are all mission critical. Why isn't there a new version of this web-app that works with IE 9? Couldn't tell you but I'm sure that the developers have been spoken to.

RockerGeek!
RockerGeek!

They've flown under the radar. At this point, their either up for a life-cycle replacement PC (win7 by default, no choice!! MWAHAHHAAHHA) or they're starting to get problems and wwhen we go to the client we schmooze them into the idea of win7. My favorite leverage tool- "It's so much more secure than XP" Clients love that idea! "When can I switch?"

Slayer_
Slayer_

We will still require Admin level accounts for users, but it should work with UAC set to max.

deisenbarth
deisenbarth

I find these type of polls very interesting - the fact that you need to face is that while a total of 71% agree that they should be moving off of XP only 23% have successfully completed the migration. This tells us that the pain points of staying on XP are still less than the pain points of migrating to a new operating system (including Windows 7). It demonstrates how virtualization of the desktop could (provided they can bring their pain threshold down) own this space.

SKDTech
SKDTech

Whether it is a move to Win 7 or 8, Linux, BSD or OSX there is no excuse not to be planning to migrate off of XP by the End of Support date. Legacy apps need to be either upgraded or replaced, it may hurt in the short term but businesses will be better off if they tackle this issue now instead of waiting until it is too late and having to pay much higher rates to resolve the increasing hardware/software incompatibility and security vulnerabilities. It can be compared to the Y2K problem. A whole lot of work took place behind the scenes to make sure the bug didn't happen and it turned out to be a non-event thanks to all that work. But if the work had been put off until after the fact the cost would have been much higher to fix after the fact.

nedvis
nedvis

None of our business critical application would run on anything other than Win XP and that's exactly why I am master in cloning all our workstations' hard-disks with free Linux Live-CD Clonezilla. Thank you XP and thank you Linux! Sage Abra HR& payroll : http://www.dresserassociates.com/abra-system-requirements.asp Orbitz supplies ordering system : http://corp.orbitz.com/partnerships/suppliers Micros POS system : http://www.micros.com/NR/rdonlyres/08D790E5-A50A-41DD-A989-9C917D0A5BE2/0/WS5Specs.pdf Medical Records software Ultracare: http://www.mdiachieve.com/solutions/MDS30/index.asp http://www.mdiachieve.com/solutions/mobilecharting/mdiachievepoc/MDIA_POC_SystemRequirements.pdf Only few cloud based services ( http://www.pmworx.com/ and http://www.pointclickcare.us ) allow us to use Vista and Win 7 computers and that's it. So I can't care less about OS migration headaches and I am pretty much safe with my WinXP boxes. Bussineses apparently aren't runing at Microsoft speed which I like BTW.

kitkimes41
kitkimes41

I don't agree with the poll but when I do, it will be to go Linux full time. No more Microsoft for me.

galach
galach

As far as possible, I am switching Win XP for Linux. Some clients don't want to trade MS for Linux, for a couple of reasons (from familiarity with Windows to applications that will not run on Linux), but I am surprised with the adhesion (about 43-45%). I think that if Linux was developed with more padronization (specially in folder structure/system files organization) and had a community more occupied in discuss how to make it more accessible instead of attack MS, this would be a greate time to catch more users. Aside some applications that will not run in Linux, the majority of home users needs are met by any distro, out of the box, and it would make a lot of sense to swap XP for Ubuntu (for example), since it is free and so beatiful as Win 7 (or even more, in my opinion). But (still in my opinion) the majority of Linux community have a long way to learn that defend Open Source is more than calim that it is better; is to show how "ordinary" users can use it just like (or better than) Windows.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The Legacy Apps are the big one for most customers but M$ themselves have also contributed to this with at least one of my customers who refuse to have anything to do with things newer than XP. I still have not found out what the Person from M$ did to this crowd but they really peeved them off somehow about Vista to the extent that if I take anything in with Vista Ready or 7 Ready I get thrown out. The fact that M$ has also introduced an Desktop App to the end of support for XP that will not run on XP isn't helping all that much but the way that M$ is pushing the idea of Addiction to XP isn't helping them. Col

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Why are you staying with Windows XP; what is the factor tying you to that operating system? Do you have no other options?

Slayer_
Slayer_

I've played old DOS Star trek games on Win7, surely Halo will work fine.

hermeszdata
hermeszdata

In my daily activities, I deal with M$, Linux, Mac, Proprietary OS, and hardware from every known CPU based manufacturer out there. I have been involved in migrations from NT to 2K, 2K to XP, XP to Vista (the worst nightmare for many) and now XP/Vista to W7. During that same period (1999 to present) I have seen Linux come and go. What Linux that has stayed has been server based so only the net admins are ever using it. As mentioned earlier, one of the greatest issues with Linux is the fact that most of the apps businesses use will not run on linux and even now with products like OpenOffice there are compatibility issues. Tech support is also a major problem when using "Free" OS products. When we add the learning curve to migrate to linux the cost/benefit equation goes upside down very quickly. I recently began migrating from XP/Vista to W7. Honestly, I think W7 is 10 years late. the OS is fast, robust, and easy to navigate and administer. The problem is that if one is running systems more than 3 to 4 years old, there is no driver support even from the major manufacturers (HP, Dell, etc.). I have a couple of P4 (2.4G to 3.0G processor)boxes with 4GB RAM that scream in agony with Vista installed but I cannot upgrade them to W7 due to lack of driver support so now they are relegated to being file servers running Server 2003 R2. As much as it pains me to say this, any business who insists on running obsolete OS and apps is a business who is not long for this world. Upgrading hardware and Apps every 3 to 5 years is something that any business should have built into their budget. Older hardware simply cannot keep up with the increased processing demands faced on a daily basis. A couple of years ago, I began keeping an informal inventory of hardware and OSs being used by various companies I dealt with remotely (especially when I heard "hang on a minute, my PC is being sluggish today!") even as late as this week, I spoke with a "remote" support person whose PC was a PIII running W2K and this was a well know, major corporation! W2K was dead 6 years ago! With that said, I run a combination of HP and Dell servers (DL380 and 2650 respectively) in my office, all 64-bit XEONs (8 year old servers). Will they run W7? Don't know. They will run Server 2007 and 2009/10/11 without issues. W7 is a desktop OS designed for workforce productivity. Given the increased demands for bandwidth and data transfer why would any company want to continue with obsolete hardware and software when running their business. Here is a real world scenario: Everyone knows Blockbuster Video (at least here in the US). They have been closing locations right and left over the past 2 years and have all but disappeared. Their back office servers are/were 386/486 based machines. Within an 18 month period, I swapped servers sent via FedEx an average of 3 times a month at 15 locations in my area. When one considers the cost of FedEx overnight delivery (excluding my onsite fee and what the company I contracted with charged), they could have been money way ahead by purchasing new hardware and migrating their linux based apps to the new machines. Instead, they had unnecessary days of down time and many dissatisfied customers who ultimately took their business elsewhere. On the other hand, other major retailers systematically upgrade their systems and continue to thrive because they do not lose revenues due to unreliable IT infrastructure. Everyone fights change. This is the nature of being human. Smart businesses do not fight change but they are also very careful when approaching necessary changes. Continuing with the Obsolete, soon unsupported, XP, is not cautious, it is reckless from a business perspective.

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

I was STILL able to find SH hardware to use on even older, Windows 98SE computers. So... no problemo! And printers, CAN be repaired, did you know that? We're still using an old Apple laser printer that was manufactured waaay back in 1998. Why shouldn't we? It can still be repaired and runs OK! As a matter of fact, the main network printers are 2 HP LJ 4200 and one Minolta BizHub all made in 2002-2004. Still running decently on an even older HP 690 DeskJet printer. Repairs will bring the equipment back to 99% of its original functionality and will only cost a minute amount of the price for a new equipment. Oh! By the way! In MY part of the world money just WON'T grow on trees!

gcomputeronet
gcomputeronet

You can set IE8 or IE9 to use IE7 for particular websites. Just need to test and see if it works for that application.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Anyone who bases an application on a browser is asking for trouble. How incompitent are the web developers who programmed these applications. It is planely sloppy. It's like the rule for never to hard code anything.

SKDTech
SKDTech

If done correctly the user never even needs to know it has changed. That is kind of the point of web apps.

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

I've bought a new state-of the art computer for my desktop last autumn, and was still able to install my old XP license on it! I've made a backup image of the hard drive with all the updates and if something goes wrong (like MS discontinuing support), I can always use it to restore. So.... As for the "more secure" thing, maybe you can sell it to morons but not to knowledgeable people. Install a good antivirus/ firewall suite (I for one run on Bitdefender) and be carefull what you install (READ ALL THOSE MESSAGES!!!!) and you're safe! If and when I'll switch, It'll probably be Linux.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

You will still get UAC prompts as an admin.

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

Didn't quite get you on that one... How can virtualization bring the "pain threshold down"? Please explain. To me at least, virtualisation is just another pain in the.... AC socket, if you'll excuse the roughness ot the expression. Isn't it a little hazardous to have more than one issue depending on one computer? That is if it goes "berserk" then you lose it all, not just part of it. That is, it's a bad business decision to put all your eggs into the same basket, particularly when that basket isn't even yours...

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

I can see no financial benefits from migrating to Win7. Moreover, I can definitely see financial... deficits from doing it. Can't you?

DesertJim
DesertJim

We made the switch sometime ago (8.04 LTS) and the linux desktop has come a long since then so I would expect to see less resistance now. However we do have some legacy apps and use VMPlayer to run XP for these on a desktop by desktop requirement. Users soon start to prefer the native linux if it is introduced as a proper business change programme, (from the top, product champions, local super users, plenty of communication). Then they meet the linux communities and the interminable "yes it is! no it isn't!" positions which pass as debates and they wonder what they have got themselves into. Perhaps there is a need for a moderated business community which cuts all this out. (perhaps there is one and I don't know of it) The key is the OS's (including apple and all the smart phone variants) are different, work in a slightly different way, which you had to when you wanted your iPhone or Blackberry on the corporate net, and you'll be OK. If the communities helped people exploit the differences rather than showing off their prejudices linux would take a defensible market share and I could get rid of all those damn VMs.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

I can imagine a lot of things going wrong when the V-word is involved...

Kostaghus
Kostaghus

...peanut butter and jelly is due to one thing and one thing only: MONEY!!!!!

Ric_Shanahan
Ric_Shanahan

I have run the advisor periodically to check for any update that would allow HALO support. Still none. Outlook Express is also not supported. Seems like a step backward in my opinion. I'm not afraid of change as long as it's an improvement.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[i]OpenOffice there are compatibility issues[/i] There are issues between different versions of M$ Office let alone other Office Suite Makers out there. Currently if you are using a New M$ Office you can not submit Government Tenders in it's Native Format as the Government Infrastructure is incapable of reading them. Not a problem if you understand this and have the necessary infrastructure in place to prevent problems but for the majority of people who are highly technical and deal with Government Contracts they lack the necessary skills to know that their Submitted Tenders will not be readable by a Government Tender Officer. Just ask your Local Specialist Surgeon what they think of Computers in general and you'll get not very well made or easy to use as a normal comment. When they actually mean that Windows isn't very well made or very easy to use. The problem that you and everyone else is facing with M$ Office Incompatibility Issues is borough about not by following [b]"Best Practices"[/b] but using M$ Office almost exclusively and like any other [b]Mono-culture[/b] environment will eventually lead to the destruction of everyone involved with this. Here we need to make a [b]Open Standard[/b] and [b]Enforce[/b] it which just is impossible when you have a company like M$ designing the Standard that they wish to use this week and which can be dumped when it is no longer suitable for them to follow. [i]Tech support is also a major problem when using "Free" OS products.[/i] I suppose this could be correct depending on the OS in use and how well the operator knows it. But then again the same can be said for any OS and most of the Paid For ones from the Nix Community offer much better support on the Big End Servers. For instance IBM with SUSE and Fedora guarantee to have a fix for any OS Software problems within 48 Hours where as a company like M$ makes no such warranty and may leave issues that they know about unaddressed for months or years depending on how they perceive the problem not what Real World people are experiencing. [i] They have been closing locations right and left over the past 2 years and have all but disappeared.[/i] Hardly a good example as that company is in a position of not having a Web Presence and relies on people going to their Bricks & Mortar Establishments where as their previous customers are wanting to access this type of thing On Line and have stopped going to their Stores. If they had of been changing their Back End Hardware every second week that Business under those conditions would still have got into the trouble that they currently are in. The only difference is that maybe when the receivers finally walk in the door there will be more salable assets that they can realize money on. However I personally would prefer to be into the Receivers for a few hours of Labor rather than trying to get payment for a few new servers from them. [i](especially when I heard "hang on a minute, my PC is being sluggish today!")[/i] Hardly a good example as I hear things like that on a almost hourly basis and it doesn't seem to be affected by the Hardware/Software in use. I have heard comments like this since I worked for IBM as a Mainframe Tech a long time ago till today on a i7 CPU with 8 GIG of RAM running 7 64 Enterprise. Unfortunately that comment covers many things some of which may be a slow computer and most of which are related to other things particularly with Hot Note Books tirelessly connected the Internet. The [b]Slow Connection[/b] is the Wireless Broadband but to the user the computer is slow. Even plugging in a Wireless Broadband USB Dongle today had me looking for a problem because it took so long for the system to correctly load the Drivers for the Dongle and say it was ready for use. The only possible improvement to that 6 month old computer would be to include USB 3 support on the i7 CPU system. Defiantly not a Low End NB and defiantly not the run of the mill NB that you'll ever run across. Probably more to the point here the correct question should be [b]Why would anyone persist with Wireless Internet?[/b] the more that adopt it the slower it gets and there is no solution for this issue. But without Wireless Broadband the people wouldn't be mobile and they would be tied to a Bricks & Mortar building to do what it is that they need to. Blockbuster is however a perfect example of [b]Bad Management[/b] where when new trends emerge the company instead of embracing them tried to hide from them hoping that they would simply go away and instead of updating hardware when the Tax Cycle made them no longer a Valid Deduction to Business they preferred if what you say is correct preferred to claim as a Tax Deduction the Service Fees that they incurred by failing Hardware. Defiantly not the best option but having seen the way that some companies are treated by Outside IT people it's perfectly understandable. The Companies who work this way are not concerned about the cost of the Hardware but the Cost of the Data on that Hardware where as the Outside People are much more concerned with the cost of the new hardware that they are supplying so they rip out the old fit the new and do not migrate Data Across they expect the Business to do this from their Nonexistent Backup's. Or in the case of one of the much bigger places their Spare Parts System was ripped out one week end while no one was there and replace with the newest and latest with a full migration of the Data but no training for this tasked with using the system. Sure that had used the same software previously but they completely didn't know how to point their new systems to the Data that they had to use to do their work. Hence when I went there for a 5 cent specialist screw I was told to come back in a weeks time and maybe then they could invoice it out to me. Their own Tech where in the same position of being unable to get any spares so the entire Spares Section was shut down while those staff where retrained for 2 weeks. Or the case of the Health Department here who introduced a new Pay System for their Staff 2 years latter some staff are still waiting to get paid normally and most are yet to receive their full entitlements since the System Change. If they are very lucky they will finally have that system fixed when they rip it out to replace it in 10 years time. Although with the above I should mention that Migrating from a Vista System to 7 is about as easy as moving from 95 to 98 it was just the initial bit of moving off XP which was the killer. But even them you need to understand why this happened M$ who have never meet a deadline in their entire life went with XP to prevent the constant [b]Bad Press[/b] that surrounded every new product launch. They continue to announce Unrealistic Projected Release Dates and then get hammered by the Press when they fail to meet these self imposed deadlines. Instead of continuing along these lines they should stop announcing release dates or they will continue to run into the situation where people and the press get Peeved Off by late new software and those who continue to ask should I leave this OS and wait for the next which will be out in 2 years time? That is the biggest problem that M$ needs to overcome. Linux on the other hand seems to release a new OS every 12 months or so without the problems that accompany M$ releases. Col

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. When it breaks too much, replace it. That's the philosophy here. The margins in the grocery business are so small, even the major chains think twice (or three times) about equipment upgrades. I have customers that still use PIIIs for their cash register PCs, point-of-sale controllers, and store processors. Why? Because they still work, and the cost to replace them can kill a month's profits.

Slayer_
Slayer_

We were getting UAC prompts from our legacy code compiled in VB5. and other things compiled in VB5 were getting flat out blocked by UAC, it would just error mysteriously without a proper error code or debug. Our VB6 stuff and .Net stuff was fine, so we managed to convince the "other team" to recompile their work. This required me, and several managers, and the president of the company, putting pressure on this other team. (I suspect department cuts were threatened)

Slayer_
Slayer_

The top 2 video card developers no longer support direct X 7 and older, any games runing DX7 and older will either crash or run at almost 5 frames per second, if you are lucky. \I often think it sad that my 9600 nVidia runs Worms Armageddon at top, 15-20 FPS. Whereas my old ATI Rage 1 (4mb video card) runs the same game at max graphics at 30fps. And this is a basic 2D game written in DirectX 6

TheChas
TheChas

Microsoft no longer bundles an email client with the OS. Outlook Express was replaced by Windows Mail in Vista, and is now replaced by Windows Live Mail. Best option, use Mozilla Thunderbird or Outlook. You can get themes for Thunderbird so that it is almost identical to OE. Chas

Ric_Shanahan
Ric_Shanahan

This site says yes: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/compatibility/windows-7/en-us/Details.aspx?type=Software&p=Microsoft%20Halo%3a%20Combat%20Evolved&v=Microsoft&uid=1&l=en&pf=0&pi=0&s=HALO%2032bit&os=32-bit So when I upgrade to Win 7 or 8 I'll know for sure. "Return to Castle Wolfenstein" did not work with the newest Catalyst driver from ATI/AMD and the Advisor says it is not supported. Had to regress until the last driver that did work. I'll just stay with a multi-boot machine. Thanks for your input!

Slayer_
Slayer_

Most of those programs, can work if you turn off UAC. if our ancient 32 bit software from 1995 works, Halo will work. They haven't even gotten rid of ODBC yet. They still haven't fixed the memory leaks from transparentblit. Windows really isn't changing much over the years.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Company I worked for ten years ago, were selling off a division, but the people would still work at the same desks. They wanted me to figure out what to charge them for IT infrastructure. I went in to assess what they did. In one office they had an XT clone running DOS 3.3. It was connected by serial cable to a scientific device. It worked. But it was at that point roughly 13 years old. I asked how important it was - they use it every day. What would happen if they couldn't use it - they would be in violation of an operating license. I suggested to them that it isn't a question of IF hard drives die, its WHEN, and that they should find something newer to replace it, and have a back up plan for when it failed. A simple thing, but they needed someone else to point it out to them.