Windows

Poll results: Just how satisfied are you with Windows 7?

How did your peers answer this question: Just how satisfied are you with Windows 7? The results may be skewed in a direction you did not expect.

On April 9, 2010, I polled TechRepublic members on this question:

Just how satisfied are you with Windows 7?

According to a Forrester Research study, most of the early Windows 7 adopters are very satisfied with the operating system. I know I am. But I was curious as to how fast IT professionals on TechRepublic were taking to the latest Microsoft operating system.

It appears, despite a very vocal disagreeing minority, the vast majority of our poll respondents (84%) are very satisfied or at least satisfied with Windows 7.

And that leads me to wonder: What exactly are the Windows 7 naysayers complaining about? Are you one of the Windows XP holdouts or Vista haters who have absolutely refused to give Windows 7 a fair shake? Do the results of this poll at least give you pause; do think that maybe you should actually give Windows 7 a serious look now?

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

77 comments
jeroldo
jeroldo

My only problem with Win7 is not really with Win7. It is with INTEL and with HP both of whom refuse to create/modify their drivers to work with their products in Win7. I have a three year old INTEL MB and INTEL refuses to provide Win7 drivers (.inf) for the MB. Similarly, HP refuses to provide a driver for Win7 that will work with my HP Laserjet 1012, at least for the 64 bit version. They did sorta fix that for the 32 bit version of Win7. It sorta works. But, IMHO, manufacturers of Computer hardware and periferals should make drivers available for OS's for 10 years after manufac. date. I originally installed Win7 64bit but deleted that and installed the 32bit version. Man! Am I glad I did that. The 32bit version of Win7 Pro that I am running now is just terrific. (except for those few nagging driver problems. Oh, and there was absolutely NO extra crapware or trials in the Win7 package. Just Win7!

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

The HP site offers these drivers for your printer: ? Linux ? Mac OS 9 ? Mac OS X ? Mac OS X 10.6 ? Microsoft Windows 2000 ? Microsoft Windows 7 (32-bit) ? Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit) ? Microsoft Windows Vista ? Microsoft Windows Vista (64-bit) ? Microsoft Windows XP

Noprisoners
Noprisoners

Very pleased on the whole, seems a bit smarter than XP, which I still have on another drive. So far 7 has not given me one problem, can't be bad. Steve

bjackson
bjackson

I voted VERY dissatisfied. Because the Beta ran perfectly on my pc. The RC ran perfectly on my pc. The released version FREEZES after a max of 5 minutes on my PC. After wasting a complete Sunday upgrading this n that, hacking this part of the registry n that, reinstalling and waiting in the @#@$#$%$%^$%&^%^ queue to activate it yet AGAIN!!! I finally found... my 3 year old ASUS motherboard is too OLD and I have to get new hardware. W7 is dead. Long live UBUNTU. Runs perfectly on my desktop. AND, my new mac book pro "just works". Thank You... Microsoft..., I now have two trouble free computers for the first time in my life:)

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

I assume that you ran the Microsoft Upgrade Advisor program... Just needed to bash Microsoft...

sirwriter
sirwriter

Before Win 7 XP was the best Win OS I'd ever used, and I've been using computers since the 286 was news. Win 95 was pretty good, but XP seemed to have more people gathering to post fixes for XP and tips to make it run better. I switched to Vista because of all that it was supposed to do. IMHO, Vista was released too soon. I think it was the basis for Win 7 but not yet ready for prime time. Add to that the confusion with all the different versions and the machines sold by vendors loaded with Vista when the hardware was clearly not ready, and Microsoft's responses to the whole mess, and you can see that Microsoft was out for the bucks. Period. When they got Win 7 ready, I was so disgusted with Vista I bought one disk to try. Right off the bat the difference was obvious. I think Microsoft instilled some confidence back into the consumers. I have installed over 40 Win 7 OS's on machines and only one had to seriously be reworked. I am 90% satisfied with Win 7. I am 50% satisfied with Microsoft. One day Microsoft will lose the OS market. And it will be because of their attitude toward their customers.

jpom22
jpom22

was the clearest, easiest OS windows ever put out, with the highest accessibility to everything. and it fixed all the quirks of win 95, installed right over it with no problem.

bazaargenie
bazaargenie

I admit being one of those who had at least gotten used to XP. That being said, I like many of the new features in Win 7, but I find it just as if not more unstable than XP. I constantly have to reboot, files don't execute as well as they should where I have to toggle between open applications and windows using alt/tab to respond to open/save and confirmation prompts, and other such inconveniences. I would rate it a 5 On a scale of 1 - 10.

mla_ca520
mla_ca520

I'm very happy with Windows 7. I have installed it on my workstation at work and all my home PCs. It works flawlessly at home. At work, we have several enterprise applications, which require workarounds. Some require oracle 6i client installations, others require local foxpro data to be stored and jinitiator causes a data execution protection error in IE8. I have found workarounds for everything. None of our vendors supports Windows 7 and the quantity of workarounds means we won't be deploying soon, however, I like the OS. My complaint is with our vendors, who are comfortable charging rather sizeable annual support fees but they haven't gotten on the ball with supporting their software on current versions of Windows. Win 7 RC has been available for more than a year now and it seems that our vendors could devote one or two techs to figure out how to support their products on current business platforms. I figured it out for multiple applications within a few days. oh well! All my home PCs have Win 7 and Ubuntu 10.04 dual boot, which I also like pretty well.

WSHBaker
WSHBaker

When I purchased a new PC w/Win7-Pro I was told that it would run Win-XP. Later I found out the yes, it would IF you went to the trouble to download and run some specific additions from Microsoft. Should have been built in, not an option for later addition with noted problems if errors are made during the installation.

jpom22
jpom22

in the first place.

carlsf
carlsf

REASONS as below.... WE use XP and WIN7 (32 and 64bit) and have had NO problems.... We hate the fact that MS have removed the "CLASSIC" option a standard with our set up, we use this for ease of configuration and the fact that our users know where to find things, also ease of support, our techs spend less time fixing problems. Libraries, jump lists, Task Bar, Networking with XP and VISTA, are all not easy. SORRY MS unless the "CLASSIC" is returned we will be looking elsewhere.

Brian Doe
Brian Doe

As much as I can appreciate the fact we love familiarity, there are times when supporting legacy or "classic" layouts and functionality can be nothing more than a huge boat anchor against forward progress for what amounts to little more than a security blanket for some users. I am one of those who at first railed against the UI changes in XP but eventually learned to work with it; and now I find "classic" mode very limiting. I got used to Windows 7's jump lists and task bar, and now that I've had to revert to Vista, I find myself very constrained in comparison. So, it's all about what you are willing to re-acquaint yourself with in the name of forward progress. Otherwise, we'd all still be using Windows 3.1's dreadful desktop!

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

Oh, you ARE the support staff! In the world of technicians I must say that your view of Windows 7 is shared by other techs somewhere on the order of perhaps 2 of 10. (2 sharing your own sentiments) Being a technician, the users whose machines and systems you are charged with supporting will likely mirror your efforts to support them or your lack of initiative to learn the new system. NEVER allow their resistance to change to influence your own opinion. Just a minimal amount of time on your part in learning the "significant" advances in user-productivity and efficiency would enable you to pass this down easily to your users. But then riding the old Vista-hating bandwagon for all its worth is easier I suppose. In my honest opinion you should be ashamed of yourself. These changes aren't rocket science. Move past complacency. Make a miniscule effort to understand why the changes came about to begin with. Its a fast-paced technological world we live in today. So unless CLASSIC is returned your solution is to move to something that will take exponential amounts of training, study, money and resources to accomplish? Are you a member of Congress by any chance?

Northlite
Northlite

I set up computers all the time - none of my users even know what a start menu is let alone that it has changed since Windows 95 - with Windows 7 I can pin the usual apps they use daily to the task bar and then add desktop short cuts for the rest - granted they only use maybe 5-6 different apps but three pinned and 2 on desktop doesn't clutter up much. I can totally relate to resistance to change, recently I had a client go from Quickbooks 99 to 2005 and they couldn't find anything to be able to use it because their usual short cuts where not on the menu bar. My point here is not only operating systems change in look and feel, programs from other vendors do also. Granted there are two attitudes one can have about anything in life - I can figure this out or I can't use/do this any more because it's not like it used to be. Bottom line tho unless computers need to be replaced most companies and individuals have no compelling reason to upgrade to Windows 7 - at least this is my experience with it.

carlsf
carlsf

We are purchasing new systems and using the WIN7 key to load VISTA, and using the "CLASSIC" option. MS hate us but it is their loss, they know of our feelings and the reasons. If the want to retain us along with a large number of other users/clients then replace the"CLASSIC" option (forget pinning, jump lists, libraries, etc). We are currently evaluating other O/S's options.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Earlier you said your users didn't like the W7 interface. The one in Vista isn't that much different. If you're going to load Vista, you might as load W7. If you don't like the W7 look, load XP. There's nothing wrong with Vista on appropriate hardware, but the perception of it as damaged goods will probably lead to premature termination of support by software and driver manufacturers.

Northlite
Northlite

with out the classic menu from Windows 98 days it is wise to seek another operating system that has it - there is no since in being under productive because of that.

DHCDBD
DHCDBD

I wished Ubuntu functioned with as few problems as W7, or Debian, or Slackware. I have not had any problems running anything from very old DOS based software to last weeks release of Guitar Pro. My users have had no problems either.

chatfield
chatfield

I wasn't sure I was satisfied with Win7 - until... Added WinXP compatability mode in the virtual machine. It's only been useful for a couple of items, but removed any show stoppers for running Win7. (My main workstation was OK at running Vista, but much better with Win7!)

Hazydave
Hazydave

I was running 32-bit XP on one PC, 32-bit Vista on a laptop, and really wanted one 64-bit version (yeah, I already had a number of apps with 64-bit editions). Vista was too much of headache, but Windows 7 seems fine. That comes primarily from it just being out of the way. There was a time when the OS was big news; these days, it's best if just seems to disappear. I guess a big part of that is just working as expected, and not messing things up. Kind of like an IT department. The one big fail in Win7 so far: their brand new shiny Firewire driver was even worse than the "legacy" driver (they provide both), as least for accessing FW800 hard drive. Their security stuff is still fairly useless if you're running anything older -- they need a way for a user to authenticate a trusted application, permanently. Otherwise, you pretty much have to shut off their enhanced stuff. I guess the big thing Microsoft discovered was that users aren't entirely sheep. Every release of Windows going back to the Win9x days was increasingly adding things to advanced Microsoft's grip on this or that, but rather than making the OS better to live with, most of this was user hostile. This go around, they mostly just polished the sharp edges in Vista, rather than more un-asked-for in-yer-face things to keep Microsoft on top. One really has to ask if there's still even a need for a full desktop OS to ever have major revisions to it. Linux is a good model of this... you have dozens of incremental changes to dozens of components, and occasionally, a big change to one component (like Gnome 3.0), but it's like my PC. I've had my PC for decades. Every single part in the PC has changed many times, but never in one shot did a new machine replace the old. The only real reason for drastic and disruptive OS upgrades is money: Microsoft wants it, you have it, and they need to convince you to spend it on their Big New Thing. There's absolutely no reason they couldn't incrementally roll out changes for a decade or two, but then they have to start charging a monthly or yearly fee, and that's now a totally different distribution model. But it's good for users to understand why these things are done this way, and the fact it, it's not necessary.

kraterz
kraterz

I only recently switched from XP, and my experience with 7 has been positive. It is really a lot more refined and polished than XP/2K ever was. Bootup, login and launch times are as good or better than XP. For the first time I can honestly say things just work out of the box, well most of the time anyway. It's obvious they have paid a lot of attention to the small but nagging details and the result is a much more usable and stable system. I thought vista would be the iceberg that would sink the microsoft ship, but they have done rather well with 7. With the Apple competition heating up, it looks like microsoft is finally realizing the devil is in the details, and that customers will no longer be satisfied with any half baked shoddy garbage they used to throw at us.

santeewelding
santeewelding

I can make fire and open my beer.

Akais1
Akais1

I can make water and make air (well, maybe gas):(

jpom22
jpom22

i can make firewater but can't make love without the little blue pill... ok, TMI

Rob C
Rob C

You should not RAISE that here

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

(and I voted that way), I'm running with local Admin and the warnings turned off. We're not ready to roll it out to users yet until we can find the tweaks needed to allow users to work effectively without having local Admin privs. We have apps we have to tell 7 to allow to run every time we start those apps; we need to figure out how to tell it once and never again. We haven't figured out how to allow users to add printer drivers without local Admin. While it appears to work, the utility our employees use to enter their work time, project hours, and travel expenses isn't supported with IE8, W7's default browser. Those are off the top of my head; we've got list of others. Once we get time, we'll research them, do a final test of our apps, and maybe roll it out outside of IE in 4Q10 or 1Q11.

burkew0@comcast.net
burkew0@comcast.net

Brand new Dell Laptop $1500 with Windows Home Premium 64 bit. Client installed latest iTunes 64 bit = > blue screen. We removed iTunes / reinstalled etc. 2 Calls with Dell support and 3 calls with Microsoft (who actually remoted in to try to fix) Neither Dell nor MS could fix it. Sent back to Dell they "repaired it" and sent it back. Still blue screens. Randomizing driver load points confuses malware , virii and apparently legit hardware drivers. Oh well...try try again Not ready for Print TIme ?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If it worked until the client installed iTunes, how is this a Windows problem? Dell should have wiped the hard drive and reloaded the system; lousy move on their part. Have you tried using the Restore disks? Oh, and it's 'Not ready for PRIME time', as in a television program that isn't ready to air during the evening prime viewing hours. See Saturday Night's 'Not Ready for Prime Time Players'.

pjboyles
pjboyles

You will need to do one of two things about your applications: A) Update your applications to Win 7 compatible versions. B) Deploy an application compatibility shim with the application. Check out the Application Compatibility Toolkit. Installation of Printers by users is a policy setting. NOTE: That allows drivers, but not vendor setups. Try IE 8 compatibility mode. While not a fan, it can solve some web site issues. One way to resolve some things is use Windows XP mode to run older applications. I have read that you actually set IE favorites to launch IE 6 from the Windows XP mode VM. Not tried it yet.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

As far as I can tell, IE8 actually does work for the functions I listed; however, the vendor specifically supports only IE7. We've been told by the first of the 2011 they'll support IE8. As to the rest, I'm sure there won't be any long-term conflicts or apps we can't make work. We just haven't had a reason to push hard on W7 deployment. We don't have any apps that require it (yet), and are still able to get XP drivers for our new hardware. The App Compat. Kit, is that something that will require programming or app development skills to use, or can the average desktop support tech make sense out of it?

Migration Expert Zone
Migration Expert Zone

I'd probably put myself right in between "satisfied" and "very satisfied." I actually most of the best stuff originated in Vista, but what impresses me most about Windows 7 is that it seems rock-solid and stable. I occasionally have problems with individual apps, but never with the OS itself.

Timespike
Timespike

Windows 7 Just Works right out of the box and has since release. A wonderful OS on so many levels.

yobtaf
yobtaf

An OS is supposed to work right of the box. Is getting what you paid for unusual?

Kenone
Kenone

Mostly because I expect a new OS to be an improvement over the older OS that it presumes to replace. I now have two pages of system changes,(secpol,gpedit,etc)and registry hacks to set just to get the system to operate as it should. Most of these are straight from MS but a few are third party utilities. I find it frustrating to have to install a third party piece of code to correct what shouldn't have been broken to begin with. The whole Windows Live thing is a horror. Having nothing to do with Win7 the crapware that the manufacturer loads on these machines is even more annoying.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

So are you one of the Windows XP holdouts or Vista haters that have absolutely refused to give Windows 7 a fair shake? Do the results of this poll at least give you pause; do think that maybe you should actually give Windows 7 a serious look now?

saved2serve
saved2serve

I am quite happy with XP, having had Vista before, and W/3.1/95/98 before that, and used the PC heavily incldg. on the Internet. Vista (tweaked, and on a 3.ghz cpu, 4gb ram PC) was slower than 9x OS were on basic tasks and navigation, on much slower PCs, and but its disk and power management is better than XP, whose speed is much better, and overall is hard to find much fault with. And browsers like Firefox and other freeware really help make computing better. Thank God for such. But there are a number of things i think MS needs to really make a move to a new OS attractive. 1. One area is speech to text (notice the order). I used Vista's, but it really comes short. Why not make it much better at learning your voice, and enable it to be easily programmed to execute functions directly, using terms you choose? I am typing this with one hand due to an injury, but hands off computing, from start up to shutdown, has lots of potential. In addition, it should be able to use your own voice for text to speech. 2. Shortcuts. I know you can make your own, but w/ free apps like AutoHotKey you can even launch lots of programs simultaneously. More preprogramed ones (like Windows key + Pause/Break) could also save lots of time on Tech support. 3. Taskbar. Can you move the icons around in W7, and change their color, and save sessions (like in Firefox, with Colorful Tabs?) 4. TCP logging. One should be able to see all Internet traffic, with diagnostics. I could add more, but that's all for now.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

has been a holy grail for a couple of decades. Dragon and Kurzweil have been working in this field with a measure of success. Personally, I don't see this as an area where the footprint is worth the benefits, but that's just me. We have enough people walking around having one-sided phone conversations without having them controlling their laptops while I'm having lunch.

mrkeith77
mrkeith77

Although I agree sitting in a coffee shop listening to five people chatter on into a headset spoils the mood, I have to say it gives some much needed freedom in other places where keeping both hands free while taking notes would be a valuable tool. Otherwise you have the voice activated digital recorder. Handy, but if you keep notes for comparison analysis on a computer, now you have to hand type them from the recorder. Much simpler to use a Bluetooth headset to your laptop and keep on working. When you are finished, simply save the file to your notes and compare later.

dgwinter
dgwinter

I had XP on multiple PC's. I tried Vista Beta and was not impressed. I skipped Vista, XP worked just fine. Win 7 is way better than both XP and Vista. The only thing I have found that doesn't work is my HP scanner. They obviously want me buy a new one, which I am not going to do. Its interesting, the Scanjet 5200 doesn't work but the K80xi does. When I need to use the flatbed scanner I run Windows XP mode and it works just fine. Quicken 2001 works, another app from 2003 works, some utilities I use from 1996 work.

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

http://www.hamrick.com/ The VueScan works wonders. Vista obsoleted my flatbed scanner so I moved it to my XP machine. By the time Win 7 appeared, Epson recommended a look at VueScan.

Rob C
Rob C

He is interstate. I have enough trouble getting him to try things that I know will work. I doubt that he will agree to experiment. But thanks for the suggestion.

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

Try the trial version. Then let the rest of us know if it works.

Rob C
Rob C

I did visit the site. I have assumed the person I am helping (via phone) has a printer/scanner. And I assumed that many others would have printer/scanners. You can chastise me (AGAIN) if I am incorrect My question still is - If Windows 7 (or the hardware site) does not have drivers, can Vuescan compensate, provided it is one of the 1500 listed ?

charleswdavis6670
charleswdavis6670

* scans documents, photos and film * creates PDF, JPEG, TIFF and TXT files * supports more than 1500 scanners * has been downloaded over 8 million times * costs $39.95 and a free trial is available I made no reference "printers", and I see no mention of supporting printers in the above quote from their web site, which you could have visited before posting.

Rob C
Rob C

I have a friend with Win7 who has a printer that does not have Win7 drivers. Are you saying that Vuescan when installed, can compensate for that, provided it is one of their 1500 listed printers/scanners ?

XnavyDK
XnavyDK

well I'm running win 7 64 on a dell studio 17 laptop with a core i7 q720 cpu, 6gig of ram, and that spiffy nice 17" 1080p hd screen. Running fallout 3 looks very good at high resolution. Crysis had to be tweaked a little just to get the frame rate I wanted. I mostly use it for work though, and sync work projects via gbridge. I also use it as a wifi hotspot for my Droid using connectify. cons, sometimes it locks up during video streams from cnn, and msn on full screen only, I went away from using dell provided drivers for the video for the ati Radeon HD 4650 and am using a beta driver set, so maybe thats the issue. It also has issues with loading libraries on windows media center for some reason it loads the music folder and the songs are listed two times. I have not messed with trying to fix it yet. And when I click on a single mp3 from the folder it gives a database error sometimes. A minor annoyance. I seen the fix listed in a few places on the web but really have not gotten around to fixing it ( procrastination) So far, I enjoy it very much and want to start pushing updates in my network. I am very satisfied from both a work and entertainment perspective. I recommend giving it a shot. Its worth it.

Tennisyoda
Tennisyoda

1. Why ? (answer below) 2. What does it do (over and above XP) I am three months into using this thing. It has wasted my money and time and the best to be said is that I'm getting used to it....what an insipid comment, eh what ? It's stable. But so is XP. Answer to Question 1 - It makes money for Microsoft. Answer to Question 2 - Nothing. Nada. Zilch.

jpom22
jpom22

massive piece of garbage. cant run several very convenient stand-alones that i've used for years, had to find out what running rules through the firewall meant, how to mess with ports for this that and the other thing, all for what? the niceties of new visuals in closing and opening windows?? so much time and effort for tons of fun and frustration.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Did it come pre-installed on a new system, or did you buy it to upgrade an existing computer?

JuliaX111
JuliaX111

Same old junk we are used to from microsoft. Broken straight out of the box and incompatible with 70% of things from just last year. We call it "force-upgrade-ware" Not suitable for purpose. I can't recommend to my IT department supervisor that it is a wise purchase. We have been using Mandriva since a forced move to Vista broke everything we relied on for our presentations and marketing. People have become used to open source applications and true open formats now. Why retrain them again? Kerching!... no sale! As for the crapware bundled with it.. no comment.. If I want garbage I'll go to a warez site thanks, at least that's free garbage of my choosing, not some "free" trial that after a few weeks insists being paid for and is nigh on impossible to remove turning instead into "mitherware" .. How to really impress busy people.. crapware that after a month fails and keeps getting in your face insisting you pay to register something you didn't want in the first place.. classy.

SubgeniusD
SubgeniusD

JuliaX111 - use PC decrapifier and Revo Uninstaller, cleans out the vendor installed crapware in a few minutes. Or install an OEM copy like I did (New Egg $135 Win 7 64 Pro). Blaming Microsoft is ridiculous. "70% incompatibility" is a complete fabrication. I've had issues with obscure apps like EasyBCD and certain ext3 file readers. Most 3rd party software tells you ahead of time. And most of the common, major stuff (e.g. VLC, Open Office) works fine as is without XP mode. BTW I have Mandriva x64 2010 Powerpack on the second internal HDD of this wide screen notebook. It's the most polished distro I've ever used and I love it. But to be fair,after lots of tweaks and additions (such as Sysinternals desktops that gives you 4 desktops like KDE) Windows 7 x64 Pro is just as good.

dnox1978
dnox1978

As for the crapware bundled, You can't blame MS for it, if you wish to blame someone blame your computer distributor or youre IT department, youre self. I have never been forcet to upgrade my OS I have decided that fore my self, Microsoft biggest issue are that they have too much compatibility from start whit olde crapy HW from erly 1990, it's time for them to do like appel, linux comuity done for years and skip legacy comptbility for very old software and hardware, and by the way Windows Vista and Windows 7 is bulit around windows 2008 kernel thas has prowen it's seurity and stability, But if you tri to use stonage drivers and sofware you will get som prolbems, It like using an egin from erly 1900 in an new lexus from 2010, it could work , but not that god.. I have bigg issus whit linux dist, becose the don't native suport my canon camer software, dont suport my canon scanner, don't support microsoft office 2007 + visio, don't support world of warcraft, don't support .net, don't support c# , and this i the software i HAVE to use, don't get me wrong other vise i love linux,gnu, and so one, becose it's a god counter weight against comersial software, so i don't have to spend more than nessesary.. But it's a free word if yoiu use linux it's fine if you use windows it's fine, but if you need to blame somen blame the right one...

mrkeith77
mrkeith77

Hey, I'm not the best speller, but then I didn't post myself as a leader in IT. If you want to be taken seriously, try taking advantage of the spell checker that comes with this blog... unless its a part of Vista, which I am using. If you spell this badly, I'm not surprised you have issues with the computer. Of the many languages it can interpret, I don't think gibberish is one of them. I'm guessing you have issues with your team as well. Do they often misunderstand your instructions? Consider an English and Spelling class... not to sound offensive to you, but to help your career.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You should have a period between your first two sentences, not a comma. Questions should end in a question mark, not a period. Apparently you're achieving your own expectations.

GeoffMichael
GeoffMichael

Check your own spelling before being critical of others ;)

carlsf
carlsf

For someone in IT your spelling is poor, I would expect this from a 8-10year old. How do you get on typeing command lines and file searches.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How were you forced to Vista? If Vista broke your apps and everyone is used to Mandriva, why did you test W7? Crapware is installed by the vendor and is not part of Windows. You can blame Microsoft for any Office trial software, but that still isn't part of Windows.

bacardee
bacardee

Windows doesn't come bundled with anything, that is the vendor that adds the bloatware, such as DELL, Gateway, etc. When you install Windows 7 straight from disk on a newly built computer, that is what you get, no extra crap. So don't blame that on Microsoft because that is the vendor's isssue. And another thing, myself and a vast majority of others have had little to no problems with compatibility for anything. Unless you are using some 16-bit Quicken 1.0 beta or something everything works as is. I have yet to find a piece of software that did not run as intended.

gareldmce
gareldmce

FTM put out two subsequent versions to run on Vista and Win 7 but they removed two functionalities that I frequently use. After much frustration, I upgraded to Win 7 Pro to run my FTM Ver 16 to no avail. I have many inventory programs written in Quick Basic that I can no longer edit and recompile without converting to Visual Basic.

Brian Doe
Brian Doe

Your average office jockeys who can't find their way to their My Documents folder aren't going to be trying to install software (at least, I sure as hell hope not). Most everyone who is empowered with the ability to install software on a corporate PC is probably going to know how to use the compatibility modes available. This leaves the home users. For most home users using relatively recent software, there shouldn't be any issues. Granted there is software out there that just simply won't run on Windows 7. If I recall correctly, there was a major compatibility debacle when Windows XP rolled out; and don't get me started about Win2k. But if you're having trouble getting a mainstream application to work on Win7, then chances are good that you're running a seriously outdated version of the software. It's about time to get rid of the Win9x-legacy software already.

Iforgotmydisplayname
Iforgotmydisplayname

We don't buy all of our software at Best Buy or download it from Major Geeks. Stop saying that everything runs on Windows 7. It doesn't. Final answer. Yes, with XP mode you can use programs that run only in XP, but try explaining a Virtual Machine to users with ten years experience running Word who still don't know how to find their My Documents folder in Windows Explorer. We know how, but they don't. If they haven't learned yet, they aren't going to.

davidb22
davidb22

I've found one or two that give problems with certain features, but major software works like a charm for me

vicluvs
vicluvs

Perhaps you could list the unwanted software bundled with W7. Also include a list of software that works with XP that does not work with W7. That might clear up this debate. I have been building systems for 10 years, and I find W7 to be as good as any OS I have ever worked with. Including Linux, and Apple.

Iforgotmydisplayname
Iforgotmydisplayname

I can list a few, but I'll leave it at this: Windows XP mode. MS knows there are apps that just will not run in Vista and 7.

ipodaddict
ipodaddict

AutoCAD 2004 doesn't. Lots of other manufacturer product selection or sizing programs don't either. I have a pristine, unopened Window 7 disk that I'm afraid to install because I believe that it will not be compatible with most of the programs I have to run for work. Thanks to HP - sold me a custom laptop just before 7 came out (shipped to me later) and it's not compatible for XP mode!! Boo to both HP and Windows on supporting small users.

jpom22
jpom22

paintshop pro 311, audacity, acid - i doubt you've even heard of them.

jpom22
jpom22

try explaining how to format even 1 file sharing program safely on windows 7 to your employees... or figure it out yourself... in the next 7-10 hours.

gareldmce
gareldmce

Family Tree Maker 2006 - Been retired for 18+ years but still do free custom projects for family and friends and genealogy as a hobby. Murphy's Law: Desktop failed two days after giving away my laptop (XP Pro & XP Home) a short time before leaving town for a month. Purchased Toshiba A505-6030 (best specifications I could find off the shelf locally) with Win-7 Home Premium. FTM-2006 would not create PDF files, found a work around (had purchased FTM-2009 and 2010 but do not use because of loss of a function that I use on my web site). In responding to a request for info, I discovered another function that did not work so upgraded to Win-7 Pro with XP virtual mode. So far, with a lot of unproductive vacation time, I have not made that work either. Many lockups requiring power switch for recovery. I have an open case number with Microsoft support.

bigredbird
bigredbird

Can you give me an example of the "plenty of software" that does not function? I haven't found any.

Iforgotmydisplayname
Iforgotmydisplayname

Have you tried looking? There are plenty of applications that will not run on Vista or Windows 7.

NexS
NexS

But crapware sounds more like OEM stuff than purely installing windows.

NexS
NexS

And in respect to it, Windows 7 made me a happy man. Sure, it's not Windows XP sp4, but that's to be expected. Making a new product has nothing to do with the comfort of the user, it is all to do with making money. It's similar enough to keep customers using it, but different enough to warrant training. Microsoft's bank account continues to rise. All things considered, I'm pretty happy (plus it's fast to boot AND log in... extra happy about that!)

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