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Poll Results: What is the officially supported browser in your organization?

See how your TechRepublic peers answered this question: What is the officially supported browser in your organization?

On December 3, 2010, I asked the readers of the TechRepublic Microsoft Windows Blog this poll question:

What is the officially supported browser in your organization?

According to Microsoft, the inertia the company saw toward upgrading officially supported company web browsers from Internet Explorer 6 to IE7, IE8, or a competitive browser has steadily decreased. The number of users still clinging to IE 6 has subsided to around 10%.

The poll results seem to bear this out, but I was surprised at how few of the respondents listed Firefox as the official browser of their organization. I thought Firefox had established itself as the browser of choice long ago. Personally, I never really liked Firefox; I have always preferred Internet Explorer, and now Chrome.

Are you surprised that Firefox did not receive more support in the poll? How do you explain the results?

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

7 comments
pgraunke
pgraunke

Not surprised by Firefox low showing in enterprise environments. Whatever its feature and security edge over, Firefox is more difficult to manage and upgrade across hundreds and thousands of desktops. It's more difficult than IE to custom configure to meet enterprise security standards and user requirements. And it's a continual pain to design and implement a smooth upgrade process so that users' bookmarks and settings aren't lost.

avcoe.631
avcoe.631

Still market leader is the giant Microsoft. And out of total windows os even if 50% user goes with IE then virtually IE leads the chart. I am bemuse not to read Chrome.

dijcks
dijcks

Windows still represents a huge use-market. IE ships with, and is integrated with Windows, and for simplicity sake, (and browser support) even iTechies give in. Firefox comes with a few "options",(like a base-model car), and even though add-ons are free, they still take time to find, sort and install. I think it's about time and convenience. IE is right there, and Firefox takes extra work to implement. IMHO.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Are you surprised that Firefox did not receive more support in the poll? How do you explain the results?

njcabral
njcabral

I imagine convenience is a main factor. Why install Firefox/Chrome/etc. onto a corporate image when you've got IE right there? Just standardize for IE and be done with it. Not that I approve of this method mind you, but I see the rationale behind it. Also, there are a lot of web-based tools, whether built by corporate or their vendors, that use ActiveX or other such technologies that work best (or only work, in ActiveX's case) on Internet Explorer.

pmcdonald
pmcdonald

Keep It Simple Silly. It is a matter of common sense. Especially if your company uses cloud apps. The majority of those apps are developed and tested on IE first. Why use a different browser and Beta test it for the developers? What surprises me is how long it takes a developer to support the next versions of IE as they are released.(Sorry, just venting a little)

yogi_john
yogi_john

An example of how long it can take some developers: My accountant uses a secure file sharing service. When I log on using Firefox I get a message the my browser is not supported. It requires IE 5.5 or higher, Netscape 7.0 or higher, Safari 1.2 or higher, or AOL 7.0 or higher. I believe they're working on an update, but I'm not holding my breath.

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