Processors

Poll Results: Will you be deploying the 32-bit or the 64-bit Windows 7?

See how your peers answered this question: Will you be deploying the 32-bit or the 64-bit Windows 7? Are you sure you are on the same pace?

On June 25, 2010, I asked readers of the TechRepublic Microsoft Windows Blog to answer this poll question:

Will you be deploying the 32-bit or the 64-bit Windows 7?

TechRepublic member mgihouse actually inspired the poll question with an e-mail earlier that week. Several years ago TechRepublic asked this question, and the answer was quite different this time around. It appears that the 64-bit operating system has become the standard, which makes sense, given the widespread deployment of workstations that can handle processing at that level.

So, what about you and your organization? Is 64-bit your new standard?

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

26 comments
microface
microface

The 15 Small businesses that I perform IT tasks for want nothing to do with M$Soft. They have all moved to Ubuntu, OpenOffice, and Or Google DOCS

jfuller05
jfuller05

:) Years and years from now. lol We'll probably go with the 64 bit version. Some of the workstations can support 64 bit, but the majority our machines are 4+ years old Dell optiplexes that aren't 64-bit worthy. So, we do have some running 64 bit versions (our Windows Sever 2008 machines) while the XP machines are 32. I do see Windows 7 64 bit in the future, I'm just thinking by the time I have the green light to deploy there will be a new Windows OS. Once again, we'll be "behind." The motto where I work is "not broke? Don't fix." To a degree I subscribe to that motto, however, I think 7 could be useful to the workplace.

ggrimstad
ggrimstad

If you use a windows mobile phone to sync your calender and contacts go with the 32 bit version of office 2010 not the 64 bit in Windows 7. There is a problem when you use the 64 bit version of Office on the 64 bit Windows 7. The Sync with Office does not work and Microsoft does not plan on fixing the problem!?!?! Got to love Redmond. Besides that we will go with 64 Bit.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

The way the question was asked, it PRESUMES that Windows-7 will be deployed, skewing the poll into meaninglessness. If the question was really "64-bit or 32-bit Operating System" ("It appears that the 64-bit operating system has become the standard ...") then why did the poll ask specifically about Windows? There are MANY operating systems available in both 32 and 64-bit versions. Having said that, it also shows the proliferation of 64-bit processors in the general marketplace. "It appears that the 64-bit operating system has become the standard ..." Well no big shock there, when the 64-bit version is being BUNDLED by OEMs on 64-bit machines. Obviously, one cannot deploy a 64-bit OS on a 32-bit processor, which was more the norm at the time of the original survey, "several years ago."

john3347
john3347

I have 3 Windows XP machines and 3 Windows 7 machines. One of the Windows 7 machines is a 'store bought' laptop with Windows 7 64 bit. All the others are 32 bit. The 64 bit laptop has 2 GB ram - WHY 64 bit pre installed on a 2 GB machine? (I actually did not realize the new laptop had 64 bit OS until I got it home and out of the box. There were no markings on the box to indicate 64 bit. That would have been a deal breaker for me at any price) One would make certain assumptions on a computer with 2 GB installed..........WRONG! I am not one who must be on the bleeding edge with either software or hardware and I have several older programs that run quite satisfactorily on Windows 7 32 bit but will not install on Windows 7 64 bit. Sadly, Microsoft Windows Home Server Connector software in one of them. I have 2x2GB memory modules on the two Windows 7 installations that perform smoothly and quickly with every piece of software I have thrown at them. I see ABSOLUTELY no benefit for me with a 64 bit OS and will probably 'upgrade' my 64 bit to 32 bit so it will perform peacefully with my software and my other computers. 64 bit may be correct for some users, but 64 bit is not a universal application appropriate for everybody. In this case, both 32 bit and 64 bit need to remain in production for several more years before phasing out whichever one loses the race. 32 bit OS is correct for my network.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

A while ago I was asked by a Rep from M$ what I was deploying and I just replied Windows 7 64 Bit. The 7 wasn't of interest but the 64 Bit was to them at M$ and they asked why I was using exclusively the 64 Bit OS and not their 32 Bit version. My response was that I just couldn't see the point in installing a 32 Bit version of 7 with it's limitations. With the advent of Vista there was no reason not to deploy a 64 Bit OS other than the fact that no one wanted Vista but with 7 and the people wanting it even with the Software Compatibility Issues that come with it it's a pointless exercise in installing a 32 Bit OS onto new Hardware. Stuff in 8 + GIG of RAM for very little and it makes a 64 Bit version of Windows Necessary even if M$ has very few [b]True[/b] 64 Bit Software available. It will come and without widespread adoption there will be no need to develop any 64 Bit Applications. But even when I supply a system installed with XP now I always supply a 64 Bit Version of 7 and backload XP on the 7 backward License which gives the owners the Upgrade Path at very little cost to them. ;) Col

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

We are looking at a Win 7 migration path right now. Most likely need all new hardware, which is going to mean piece meal deployment I imagine. I run Win 7 64-bit at home though. :)

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

So, what about you and your organization? Is 64-bit your new standard?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The 32 Bit or the 64 Bit Version?

carlsf
carlsf

...a company where 64bit O/S and applications by the said same company (Microsoft) you have to be joking. By their own admission and proof have not them selves made their own products true 64bit and one has to ask WHY. And then expect us to believe them, their credibility is in tatters, and if they continue to NOT listen to their users/clients will continue on a dowmwards path.

msdamico
msdamico

Windows 7 had to be mentioned as the platform being rolled out since there are actually some people introducing NEW XP systems into production.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

This is the TechRepublic Windows Blog after all.

carlsf
carlsf

Any new systems will be 64bit processors. I find it funny that MS is its own worst enemy with 64bit, their own Applications are NOT 64bit WHY, another MS problem. We use only INTEL processors (Notebook and Desktop/Server)and the OS of choice is VISTA (PRO/Bus/Ult)we have found that with WIN7 MS has shot themselves in the FOOT, by removing the "CLASSIC" option, a standard on our systems to allow for ease of support, and users moving around systems every system is the same "makes for PRODUCTIVTY". Office 2003 PRO with the "CLASSIC" on, the dreaded "RIBBON is not productive, so we will NOT be using 2007/10. All systems are purchased with a WIN7 64bit licence "NOT" loaded and we "UPGRADE" to VISTA 64bit.

msdamico
msdamico

I have been running Vista 64 bit for a couple of years now with no problems. I have several applications that aren't certified for Vista 64 running just fine.

myepals
myepals

I have a HP Running Vista Home Premium 64 Bit. Drivers will not stay installed on this thing and it has some other quirks I do not see with 32 Bit. I would not risk the aggravation with a server myself but it may be just the thing with its smaller yet more power intensive scope.

jsmoreland
jsmoreland

Granted my desktop is a quad processor with 2gb of memory running Vista and my laptop is a 2 gb dual processor but it is significantly slower. I only develop on it when I'm traveling. Everything seems to take longer. It is great for surfing the net, using Word or Excel but for writing code I only use it when I have to.

dwmiddletn
dwmiddletn

We are running a mix of 64 & 32 bit, but on the technical compute side (geological/geophysical & engineering), the rollover of XP 64 to Win7 64 is getting a lot of pushback from our stretched IT department, but eventually will have to prevail. Given the large demands on memory & disk with our modeling & simulations, 64 bit versions have been the only way that Windows could compete with the Linux platform alternatives, and give us a single platform. Certainly, not all the corporate standard apps run smoothly, but a stable system is possible. I run Vista 64 on my laptop w/o any problems, and have no issues on XP-64 in the office.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

I have been running 64-bit versions of Windows on several PCs for a long time mow and I have had very little trouble running 32-bit applications or finding drivers. Which in particular are you having trouble with?

carlsf
carlsf

power setting are set you may find that they are set for battery max life and if you reset them to the highest option you will proball find it works faster, the down part is the battery will run doen faster. Most have a battery and a power point option, providing you dont want the battery to last a long time set the battery setting to the same as powerpoint settings. HOPE this helps...

carlsf
carlsf

There is a option when you right click the apps icon then go to properties you have an option to run it in compatability Mode with various options, I have about 3 apps working this way on a older notebook they are 32bit and the work satisfactory. Maybe worth a try. I will be staying with Vista as I do NOT like what MS has done to WIN7.

myepals
myepals

Sometimes the devices is just not recognized rebooting useful solves the issues but not always

grayknight
grayknight

My laptop has 64bit Windows 7 and has no problem witht the home connector. Use the \\server\software rather than the CD.

myepals
myepals

I have a Philips SPC600NC web cam that I have to uninstall and reinstal about 2-3 times a week and a Gigaware stereo headset that stops working about twice a month. Yahoo flakes out often, there are others but stopped making the list long ago.

john3347
john3347

Windows Home server is one that immediately comes to mind. (And really a biggie) I have WHS version 1 PP3 that all 32 bit computers XP and later can join. I get a "not compatible" message when I place the connector installation CD in the 64 bit machine. My long standing photo editing application, ProImage Plus, is another that will install on Windows 7 32 bit and refuses to install on Windows 7 64 bit. Several months ago, when Windows 7 was in beta, I decided to try a 64 bit installation. It slips my mind at the moment what the other two were, but the first three applications I attempted to install would not install on 64 bit. ProImage was one of them. If memory serves me correct, a version of KeyCad from 'back in the day' was another. I wiped and installed the 32 bit version and all went well. edit: It is interesting that Microsoft themselves recommend installing the 32 bit version of Office on both 32 and 64 bit OSs for all but a tiny percentage of power users.