Microsoft

Poll Revisited: Given a fresh choice, which Web browser would you choose?

Which web browser do you use most often? Does your business have an official supported web browser?

In 2012, TechRepublic asked a very simple question: Given a fresh choice, which Web browser would you choose? The results showed that Firefox was the most used web browser, but it is now a year later and I wonder if this result still holds true.

Personally, I have stopped using Firefox for almost everything (some internal productivity apps work better with Firefox) and have been using Chrome. I tried using Safari a few times and an Apple Air test machine, but did not like it at all. Again, Chrome was the browser of choice.

So, I'm wondering if Chrome has gained a larger market share at the expense of Firefox in the past year. Or perhaps Opera is now used by a larger percentage of TechRepublic members. Take the poll and let us know why you use the browser you use. I'm also curious if the browser you choose to use personally is the same browser officially supported by your business organization?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

85 comments
andrew232006
andrew232006

I just don't trust IE. Chrome seemed to run more smoothly than firefox to me at least. I really like the way the chrome sync works. When I login to my laptop all my bookmarks are there. When I formatted my PC I only had to log back into chrome and all my bookmarks and browser extensions were back. I believe firefox has a similar sync option but I haven't tried it.

jbaviera
jbaviera

On my primary PC. Why do I like it? Well, for the most part, it reminds me of the OLD Netscape Navigator, which I used since v 2.0(that's before IE ever existed) through v4.7. It has everything built into one Suite of programs. It's my primary Browser, e-Mail client, and web Editor(not that I do much of that). The few add-ons I have, just make it all the better. While I do use FireFox on my laptop when I'm out and about, it's SeaMonkey at home. Never felt comfortable using IE, Opera, nor Chrome.

kuliga
kuliga

when i found that option on google chrome it solved a lot of my problems. Now am using chrome only.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

For some people, speed is the primary concern. For others, security is the key factor. For still more people, plug-ins weigh heavily. Different tools for different preferences. Me, I'm driven by plug-ins and interface customizations.

vanierstein
vanierstein

Maxthon-because it is quicker-gave Firefox up for Maxthon

sightsandsounds
sightsandsounds

At first I was Amused when I read that Chrome was paying out big money to anyone who could hack into their stuff. Then I realized, hey, that's brilliant ! It makes Chrome not only safer, but innovative and cutting edge. Someplace Id rather be, than updating security every hour,,,,

Knighthawk5193@Yahoo.com
Knighthawk5193@Yahoo.com

Is Firefox....since I've been using it the longest, and it's an old friend...LoL! Also it's supported by my business and they're enjoying the latest version which comes with some enhanced features and add-ons. I have tried Chrome, but there's some things missing in it's interface that I use daily with Firefox....although Chrome is faster that Firefox...there's never any issue about how fast something gets done in my industry, (Media..) so I'm pretty much happy with FF. I don't think I'll use Chrome anytime soon.

marcellus.brown
marcellus.brown

I use Chrome mostly as I find the spell checker useful. When web sites do not work I switch to Firefox and Internet Explorer. I did not like the surprise install of Internet Explorer 10 I think this could have been planned and executed better. Ideally I would like to use one browser and all websites to work on that one browser. The website providers should state which browsers are tested and supported.

gjcooper
gjcooper

I started using chrome - found it fast and efficient UNTIL I found that using it logged into google gave google search access to pictures (and god know what else) that only existed on my HDD. They had never been up/downloaded and had never existed on the web prior to this event. I have stopped using chrome.

i51am
i51am

Spark browser is the fastest and visually best browser I ever used. But sometimes the plugins are crashing. If they manage to prevent plugin crashes, in my opinion, it will be the best on windows and mac. Unfortunately, they still don't have a linux port of this nice browser.

Hazydave
Hazydave

Mainly because it works and syncs between Windows, Android, and Linux. And it has been the most stable in my use, across two 64-bit Win7 systems and various Android phones and tablets. I keep Opera and Firefox around. Opera lacks in some areas. I used to use Firefox primarily, and still do regularly. I have fast PCs, speed is a non issue. But it''s grown very buggy on Win7 these days.. I'm measuring in crashes per hour, not day or week, and on two very different desktops... it's not just me. Tried Pale Moon too, but with much the same result. Maybe it's better under Linux, but as long as Mozilla is treating Windows support as a hobby -- even Microsoft wouldn't likely ship commercial code so buggy -- it's not something I can rely on. Shane, really. Firefox was once really good. And FYI -- no pug-ins. Bad enough without.

Stratocaster
Stratocaster

Our enterprise browser is Internet Explorer 8. Even on Windows 7. Go figure. Of necessity, naturally, that is on my work and home machines. I found that IE9/10 did not play nice at home with enterprise Web apps. I also have FIrefox, Chrome, and SeaMonkey (still like the all-in-one concept) both at home and at work. I use Chrome for anything Google, from Gmail to G+ to Google apps. Becaise of the greater granularity of control, I use Firefox for security-sensitive tasks like online banking and Web commerce. Chrome and Firefox are both on my Nexus tablet. And yeah, I like the Themes for Firefox too.

joy64
joy64

when I started to have problems with printing in Firefox's updates over 2 years ago. I switched to Chrome and haven't looked back. Same as d_cichetti it links to my tablet and smartphone without a glitch. Love it!

d_cicchetti
d_cicchetti

Simply because it manages my bookmarks between my Windows desktop, netbook, and laptop - and my android tablet and smartphone. Its fast and easy. I can open a link in a new tab or a new window.

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

I requested Chrome as an installed browser on my work laptop but was denied because the PTB said "it might have some .dll conflicts." Our default browser? IE8...I can't even count the number of times I've had trouble viewing websites with it.

meilrich
meilrich

I use NoScript, and IE Tab is very useful for those troublesome websites. Also Flashblock and Unhide Passwords (nice as a tech to see if you've mistyped). I also synch my bookmarks (and tags) across a few machines so I can have access to newly bookmarked sites wherever.

rlkilp
rlkilp

I actually think I would like Firefox better, but I always have trouble with the add ons and when I say to update them, they still never work for me. Chrome has always been dependable for me, and pretty fast. My work uses IE for browsing as a default.

sh10453
sh10453

I try to use all the major browsers, and some less known ones, at least to experiment with. FireFox remains my top choice, although it crashes quite often when a large number of tabs is open. I don't like Chrome (or Chromium, which is the version I occasionally use), especially if I need a large number of tabs to be open. Try to have a dozen or two-dozen tabs open in Chrome, then open Windows Task Manager and see how every tab is in a new Service. If Chrome crashes, then you'll have to use Task Manager to end these services one at a time! Also, if your machine idling for a while with Chrome running (again with these multiple tabs), then you bring the machine back from idle, Chrome is extremely slow in responding (for a while at least). Exiting would also be very slow. Other issues have already been mentioned by others. In short, Chrome is good and fast if I'm not opening more than half a dozen tabs. I am using FireFox release 19. I had updated to release 20, but uninstalled it, then updated to release 21, and uninstalled it as well. I noticed that releases 20 and 21 slowed down my machine considerably. Task Manager showed that these two releases were constantly using the CPU at 50% (sustained use). So I hope the developers will figure out what they were doing wrong with 20 and 21. At the rate they are designating their releases, they will soon be using 3 figures (like release 100)!!

pfeiffep
pfeiffep

An emphasis on security Google should be given credit for its dedication to security with Chrome. The company allows third parties to effectively take Chrome apart and try to exploit it in any way they'd like. If they're successful, they can earn cash rewards. The fixes are then incorporated into the browser to keep it safe. That has helped make Chrome one of the most secure browsers on the market and certainly more secure than Internet Explorer. Copied from ... http://www.eweek.com/cloud/google-chrome-browser-keeps-winning-converts-10-reasons-why-2

Regulus
Regulus

Ok, I' primarily on Pale Moon which appears to be an experimental version of FF. Works GREAT for most of my interests. However. I occasionally use Chrome for Social Browsing at leisure. For other purposes, I prefer the functionality of FF/PM. Yes, I also have IE fully loaded & updated. There (used to be?) are some sites (Primarily MS In-house - as in, What would you really expect?) that just only work in IE. As with most things, MS is a day late and a dollar short in the browser business. Where the heck were they when the cursed us with Windows in the first place? For those of you that don't know, it was Netscape Navigator that showed us the way.

mlewis
mlewis

Here at work, users are loading Chrome accidentally when they update Adobe Flash. This has caused us a great deal of grief, since Chrome is interfering with our internal applications. We need to remove it and run a fix to get the user back up and running. Some says Firefox is okay, but IE has proven to work for us.

abc123a
abc123a

I am afraid to use anything from Google. The concern is obvious - Privacy. I don't like the idea that Google has tracks me. JDS

ginmemphis
ginmemphis

We used to use IE with no problems, but when we moved our email to Google Apps many people started having problems. No problems in Chrome. I think Firefox would be fine, but users get confused with change. (I have people who don't understand what a browser is.)

gwforeman
gwforeman

I like Chrome, but there are some things I have to do in Explorer, and vice-versa. Both have their strong/weak points.

noemir
noemir

My preferred browser is FF - with add-ons to customize mt browsing experience and the ability to sync bookmarks, add-ons, passwords etc., everything I need is always at hand, no matter which of my computers I'm using.

dragonbite
dragonbite

@Shangaur Salakh: I have found while using Live that it runs better in Firefox and Chrome than it does in IE. I know, it doesn't make sense. Neither does the animated background image that is animated in Firefox and Chrome, but is not in IE 9 or earlier and even IE 10 it takes a looooong time for the animation to load, is choppy while the others are smooth and immediate. And Bing is Mcirosoft's own product! Yikes! Chrome has some nice features, not the least of which is synchronization so I have the same Chrome experience on multiple computers but I have to choose Firefox because unlike the others, Firefox is not in it to make money or "take over the web". They are in it to provide the best Internet experience with free and open tools. On Linux, when I use Office 365 or Exchange webmail I use Firefox because it looks the way it is supposed to. In Chrome Office365 Outlook looks like a Windows 95 throwback! No hidden goodies, more morals.

pbug56
pbug56

Chrome is the fastest, but it doesn't work and play well with ATI graphics on my switchable hybrid ATI Intel graphics laptop. I have to lock it in to work with the onboard Intel to avoid BSOD'ing my laptop. Plus Chrome has frequently had problems in Gmail with file uploads and downloads. Chrome also makes things like automatically going to a newly opened tab have to have an add-on to make it work. But when and where it does work it is the fastest and best integrated with Gmail. Firefox is slow and clunky, and I hate to have to use the separate search window. Plus if I want to do private browsing, they just made that a lot harder by hiding the way to do it in a new TAB. And I can have a huge number of Firefox processes without even opening the browser. It is a huge memory hog. IE10 is fairly nice - but a couple months after users found it incompatible with laptops with ATI Intel hybrid switchable graphics, HP and ATI/AMD and Microsoft still have not released bug fixes - feels like this has been forgotten. So I'm stuck with IE9 on the laptop I use the most. And again, using it with the ATI graphics can cause problems. But that seems to be an ATI/AMD problem. And using it with Gmail is painful because it often has compatibility problems, apparently caused by add-ins, and Gmail does not like being run in compitibility mode. But I'm actually using it now - the 64 bit version, though, and this version of IE9 is working a lot better for me then the 32 bit version.

USBPort1
USBPort1

I can't believe, at this point in the poll, that Chrome is beating out Firefox. I've tried several "other" browsers including Chrome, yet I always came back to Firefox and have stayed with it for the past several years. It does a much better job all-around for both work and home. I wish Windows came with the option to install the browser of your choice on a new PC so that IE isn't embedded so deeply in the OS. The hard part at work is getting users to use Firefox over IE.

Rioch
Rioch

I've been Firefox from the get-go and still am, though I keep IE for live.com and other Microsoft sites and for some work tasks that need that specific browser. I like the add-ons of course and the fact that I can customize all the commands and bookmarks I want on to one toolbar. But the 'Flash Fiasco' had me seriously searching for alternatives. I eventually seem to have it under control but I could not recommend FF to any non-techie or to anyone else at the moment. Being able to display Flash without crashing is a [i]sine qua non[/i] for any browser nowadays and if the good folks at Mozilla, for whom I have the greatest respect, can't sort this before HTML5 comes along they risk losing at least one champion to Internet Explorer.

Bear1951
Bear1951

It is very similar to Chrome but has other features like a media button that allows streaming video to be saved as a file - very convenient

mjs1902
mjs1902

My biggest problem with Chrome is it's clunky uninstall which kills other apps that have linking. Anyone with an Exchange/Outlook based messaging system will understand what I am talking about. To have to hack the registry after an uninstall is unexceptable to me. Due to the uninstall problems I have requested that users not install Chrome - but sometimes it sneeks in on the back of a JAVA or Flash update. I do like Chrome on IOS.

mcrin
mcrin

I have really, really tried to like Chrome. I have installed it multiple times thinking one more chance will convince me. I recently tried the Palemoon browser also. I keep coming back to FF. The combination of extensions and addons and the ability to customize it is just too much to overcome in other browsers. I have found it also has the smallest footprint (using the Firemin app). One concession is I DO have to use the IE Tab function for certain web pages in my work environment.

ecrespo21
ecrespo21

I just started using pale moon which is a firefox based browser and i love it so far. I find that i gained speed everyone should try it............

adriandw
adriandw

apologies - duplicate post - content deleted (it there a way to delete the post?)

adriandw
adriandw

Gave up on FF after many years because I felt it was very resource hungry on OS X. The main reason I moved to Chrome rather than Safari seems trivial. I never found a way to have Safari prompt me for a destination when I right click to download a file, which means an extra step to move it to the desired folder after download.

andrew232006
andrew232006

Is there an article about that you can link?

AMVET_66
AMVET_66

IE8 ?? are you kidding me, just update to either 9 or better yet IE10 and your view problems go away.

amandabathrick
amandabathrick

We had the same issue, also issues with Java updates too. We started using Ninite Pro which allows us to control the installation of a lot of software (including flash, reader, and java) and do the updates. You can set it so the user can't even get to the update option and it won't tell them when updates are available.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Is your private and personal information in such great demand by the KGB that you live in fear of having your identity revealed? When you use your credit card with the alias 'Mr. Smith' do you eat the paper trail and ensure that they delete all information from the retailer's database? I have no problem with sensible security, but the metal RFID wallets, fear of browsing tracks etc. is generally a result of people that don't see the forest through the trees, Going through the trash you threw out on Sunday provides as much, if not more information than Google has ever collected.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

How about an IT department that actually does its job for once? In one thread, I am reading about how IT staff want to have more control over business operations, in the next I am reading about how IT staff are clearly unable to apply simple computing changes with staff, [b]NO WONDER YOU DON'T GET TO RUN THE FREAKIN' BUSINESS! YOU CAN'T EVEN DO YOUR OWN JOB YET! [/b] I am constantly hearing about unsavvy users, which is so common when working with people who are at home and just surf news and write a few emails. When it comes to an IT department complaining about unsavvy users in the workplace, it's just a big red flag that the IT department isn't doing a good job at training or informing users with respect to the company's systems. It's no different with other apsects of a business, if a sales rep fails, the first place to look is how the sale manager. Did the rep have a fair shake at success or is it a lack of support and training that is desperately needed? NO matter how much prior experience someone has, every company has a different routine and the smaller, procedural changes need to be properly explained. While the base of the role is the same (Ex. sales is sales, I don't care what or to whom, it's the exact same skills and ability from beginning to end, the fundamentals don't change) there are always differences with each company that will make the role a success or a failure. When a receptionist can't use the advanced features of a high end copier at work, it's the company's fault for not training him/her on the office equipment. When a user is unable to use a PC to do work tasks, it is the IT department's fault for not properly training him/her on how to use it. You can roll out whatever you like, for whatever reasons, IF you teach people WHY it has changed and HOW to use it properly to be more efficient, they will eagerly adopt it without issue and future changes become easier and easier as they trust you and know that when you show them something new and how it works for their specific role, you same them time and effort. Eventually they come to you and SEEK changes and improvements for their workflow. Throwing new software on a desktop and just saying, 'that's what we use now' is not going to get you ahead in the game. Users will purposely fumble with it and complain repeatedly until the boss tells you to change it back and get workflow back on track. If the users are properly trained as to why it is changing, are shown the advantages (the reason for the change) and can realize benefits as they pertain to THEIR PARTICULAR ROLE, they will adopt it with open arms. Even the most stubborn and seemingly dense users will happily adopt technology when trained, as they feel dumb otherwise and comfortable with the old system. I know IT WAS ONCE a relatively new field and a lot of peopl ewith litle or no business/office experience at all entered a new line of work and there was an acceptance that, 'hey, they are the computer geeks, don't expect them to understand how an office works." Today that is very different, people are STILL entering IT and expect to live in a little room where nobody understands what they do and should just accept them as he office geeks. Unfortunately that security blanket is gone. IT staff need to step up to the plate and show they they command their role, which reaches MILES BEYOND simply keeping systems up and running. I was working in offices for decades before I even reached into the IT world, so for me it was a bit easier as far as bringing to two worlds together. I already KNEW how users worked in the office, what the needs for individual roles were and how to increase workflow, IT just provided me with more tools and a bit of knowledge on how to manage and build the support systems. It staff need to wake up and realize their role is much deeper than the server room, surfing TR and looking for the best browser, following the pack and hating Windows 8 etc. Sit with the AR and AP people for an hour a day for a week, you'd be surprised at what you find out about your GREAT systems, how they've learned to work around issues you could solve. Sit with sales reps for an hour a day for a week, same shocking reality I'm sure. Sit with management for an hour a day for a week, etc. If you are astute you'll instantly realize how poorly you trained staff, how they didn't read the bulletins and updates because they have OTHER jobs to do besides spending time learning why you do yours. FACT: Educating people empowers people and they will become more focused and eager to accept changes in future. It's a simple reality, try it. {rant over} Now go and do your job for once instead of complaining about idiots in the workplace. They are only no dumber than the person that doesn't lead them.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I've got a working older version at the house, but I can't remember which one it is. It works without crashing, but now I get repeated nags to update it...

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Isn't it just Ctrl click in Safari to get the right click 'save as' dialogue?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

IE 9 or 10 are simply not an option. Microsoft doesn't supply a Modern Browser for that OS. Col

andrew232006
andrew232006

You can still install chrome as a basic user.

JCitizen
JCitizen

Who zealously guard their intellectual property, that don't like or trust Google's EULA. If they like Chrome, I steer them toward Comodo Dragon, which has much better security and privacy protections. None of them uses Google search, most use Bing.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"I know IT WAS ONCE a relatively new field and a lot of peopl ewith litle or no business/office experience at all entered a new line of work and there was an acceptance that, 'hey, they are the computer geeks, don't expect them to understand how an office works." It was once a relatively new field, and office workers couldn't be expected to understand how to use computers and programs. Today is different, and office workers entering the workforce are expected to have certain skills when they're hired. Secretaries were hired with the expectation they could type, take shorthand, etc. Sales people are hired expecting to know how to sell. The manager of the company auto fleet doesn't teach people to operate cars. My job is to provide tools. If it's a new one, then yes, I expect to have to show people how to use it. But Word, Excel, web browsers, e-mail? And not just items unique to the company but simple basics? Like Freddy Prinze used to say, "Sorry, ees not my chob, man."

JCitizen
JCitizen

rules put in place during the Bush administration, and expanded during the OBama administration; these intrusive surveillance policies were not even needed to keep us safe. I agree on you with that for sure!

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I know that you have REALLY horrible privacy laws there, if you can actually consider it a privacy law at all. Technically, the government can view, listen to and take whatever they want. They own all your data when stored in a public domain and can even get your personal details from your ISP if they want to track an IP address! the whole things just seems ghastly to me, Even big brother, with CCTV cameras all over the UK, simply pales in contrast. They have a lot of restrictions as to what can be acted upon and it is monitored by a private third party. In the US, you have ANY data stored ANYWHERE and the government just has full access as they please, no wonder file sharing is such a pain there. I work for a company that provides GPS fleet tracking systems for company vehicles, You'd be surprised how many US companies come to us because they know that data is stored in Canada and at least semi secure, even for an American company. For Canadian companies, data may as well not exist, as far as the government's concerned. The government has to really jump through hoops and it takes several court appearances to even have a possibility of collecting company or personal data from an ISP. Pretty much it has to be a life or death situation or a way of tracking a known criminal etc. Nobody but YOU owns your data here, so people are a little less freaked out over it.