Enterprise Software

Poll: What is the officially supported browser in your organization?

The TechRepublic Windows Blog member poll question of the week: What is the officially supported browser in your organization?

At the consumer level, there are the browser wars, which seem to ebb and flow between the major contenders almost month to month. Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, Safari, and others lose and gain market share in a continuous tug of war. However, for many large organizations and corporations, the officially supported browser of choice is bogged down with inertia.

The officially supported internal web browser for workstations at CBS Interactive is, and it embarrasses me to say it, Internet Explorer 6. Of course, users have long ago abandoned the official web browser in favor of Internet Explorer 8, Firefox, Chrome, or other modern web browser. It doesn't matter that the help desk does not support the newer browsers -- the better security, better experience of a modern browser trumps the need for support. Firefox has become the unofficial browser chosen by users.

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For many reasons, Microsoft is very interested in getting companies and users to migrate away from Internet Explorer 6, and recent data shows that the inertia that prevented that migration is receding. As of November 2010, Internet Explorer 6's share of commercial use is at an all-time low of 10.3%. I would expect that trend to continue, and perhaps CBS Interactive will join in the migration to a modern browser in the near future.

But what is the policy at your company? What is the officially supported browser at your organization? Has the company changed with the times or is there too much inertia? What hurdles prevent the adoption of a more modern web browser? Is it even necessary for a company to have an official browser? Have users chosen their own "official" browser?

About

Mark W. Kaelin has been writing and editing stories about the IT industry, gadgets, finance, accounting, and tech-life for more than 25 years. Most recently, he has been a regular contributor to BreakingModern.com, aNewDomain.net, and TechRepublic.

27 comments
TBBrick
TBBrick

As much as I can't stand the adverts/spyware et al, there are some sites that just won't run without Idiot's Excrement.

r_j_jacobsen
r_j_jacobsen

Moved to FireFox, but many internal apps don't run on it. The CIO's office obviously didn't do much testing before making the decision. IE6 is the allowed alternative when FF can't run the web app.

howard_davis
howard_davis

IE 8, only because our internet filter only supports auto-login through IE (for Firefox you have to run a script, and I have just not taken the time to do). Plenty of teachers use FF, but they know they have to manually log in to the filter every 4 hours, or every time after they log off the computer.

Regulus
Regulus

This might be the 'official' browsers, but running analytics on my website, I get hits from Chrome = 42%, IE = 32% & FF = 21%. Your mileage may vary....

Slayer_
Slayer_

Though most of us have installed alternate browsers. I upgraded to IE7 for the PNG support but primarily use Orca. My boss uses Opera, supervisor uses Firefox 2. WE have no one on IE8. Most on 6 or 7.

flotsam70
flotsam70

Not sure that you can have _one_ officially supported browser in 2010. While I would like to push all our users to Firefox and/or Chrome, there are "a few" sites/web apps that work well only in IE. I've also run into a few cases where a site/form doesn't work in IE but does work in Firefox. A German embassy form to request a visa comes to mind.

PINASCOPY
PINASCOPY

gpo is very easy to set in ie, otherwise i use firefox

mwclarke1
mwclarke1

unfortunately, there are many bad web developers out there not adhering to standards. They either learn/use based on a Microsoft tool kit/framework and never really bother to know (or know exists) Web standards for HTML coding (W3C) or is the company they work for pushes a specific standard for the same reasons. if code by the standards then all browsers are suppose to function the same as for rendering a page correctly. However, too many times I have seen products that over utilize Microsoft custom extensions/API and other browsers not rendering the content correctly, sometimes a browser may have issues between versions but more often is the coding on the site. I for one refuse to do business with a bank that their website does not work but only with IE, on-line ordering, etc. If I open a web page and have issue with Firefox, I may try Opera, Chrome, safari, and then if only works best with IE, I will close the browser and never return. There are apps at my company that are commercial products that seem to only work correctly with IE, The company does not want to do anything but support IE, but I use Linux as a desktop so no IE. I usually flood the vendors support site about it, keep complaining to the Company about it and then just use that app :-) So as long as these issues exist with web development, then is going to be tough to get to a neutral playing field in order to determine what would be the best browser to use, Microsoft wins the war be default, may as well have a UNIX/Linux/MAC version of IE and be done with it.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

> NoScript > AdBlock Plus > Flash Block > Better Privacy and IE is set to high security mode: - AKA "Strangled functionality, can't do much with it mode"

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

But my laptop came with both IE7 and Firefox installed.

protogames
protogames

10% still support IE6? Nine years of managing support for IE6? That really upsets me. I need modern tools that help me do my job more accurately, that save me time and frustration. I need IT services that enable and support customers, not policies. I too have to bend the rules on official support in order to do my job at required level of competency. It's clear to me that change-resistant policy is not best serving customers. It's an IT-centric world where customers are here to serve policy. I'm glad I don't have to work at stonehenge, the holes in the walls would be drafty.

cbader
cbader

We are rolling out Windows 7 which comes with IE8 and thats all we give people. But users are free to use whatever browser they choose so we have pretty much all of the major browsers installed here.

Justin James
Justin James

We made the mistake of installing Microsoft CRM. It ONLY works in IE8. As a result, that's what our standard is. Other than MS CRM, we have no reason to be on IE. Not that I dislike IE per se, and I'd rather have only 1 browser to support, but it would be nice to have options. J.Ja

cperry
cperry

I think IE 8 is adequate for most of my clients but I also support Firefox as it's the browser I use personally. Most of it depends on the system as I can control IE 8 much more easily through Group Policy settings. If it's a kiosk type situation, I stick with IE 8. For general use, both are fine. On a side note, I don't support IE 6 at all unless an application absolutely requires it and there is no acceptable workaround. Since I do some web development on the side I know the frustrations of IE 6 and am doing my part to make it obsolete.

fabiogil
fabiogil

IE7, a lot users are still using IE6. Internally we use Sharepoint and it won't work in any other browser properly.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

That doesn't mean we have it fully deployed. We're still running IE 6 on about half our systems.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

What is the officially supported browser at your organization? Has the company changed with the times or is there too much inertia? What hurdles prevent the adoption of a more modern web browser? Is it even necessary for a company to have an official browser? Have users chosen their own "official" browser?

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