Windows optimize

Poll: Which edition of Microsoft Windows does your organization use?

The TechRepublic Windows Blog member poll question of the week: Which edition of Microsoft Windows does your organization use?

Recently, TechRepublic has been publishing Microsoft Windows tips that apply only to Windows 7 and often only to Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate, or Enterprise. Invariably, someone will point out in the accompanying discussion thread that the tip does not apply to Windows 7 Home Premium or Vista Home or to Windows XP. In general, I have let these remarks stand uncommented upon, because they are correct. TechRepublic is primarily geared toward the IT professional, and the assumption is that the majority of readers are using one of the Professional-plus editions of Windows.

But, as member Daniel Breslauer suggested, perhaps we are making an incorrect assumption and a poll is needed to clarify our understanding. So, with that in mind, which edition of Microsoft Windows does your organization use? Do you use a Professional or higher edition or does the Home version meet your needs? Whatever your answer, tell us why you chose that particular edition in the discussion thread following the poll.
Stay on top of the latest Microsoft Windows tips and tricks with TechRepublic's Windows Desktop newsletter, delivered every Monday and Thursday. Automatically sign up today!

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

14 comments
pjboyles
pjboyles

At work, we are feverishly creating Windows 7 builds for testing. This is the 6th test one coming up since last Spring and it is Enterprise 64-bit. As much as all the others, it too will fail to run a number of applications. I expect it to take to the end of extended support for Windows XP before the majority of the users move off of Windows XP. Divisions and application teams have a history of not updating until you remove that cold dead platform from their clenched fists when the drivers for new hardware no longer supports old version of Windows. You see no one gets bonuses for spending money, only saving money. Once more the same cycle that repeated with Windows NT 4 and Windows XP is coming to pass. "We don't have money for that" and "It is not in the annual plan" are reverberating through the buildings. "What?" I say, "Have you not seen the road maps and end of life dates sent out each quarter for the last three years?" And the refrain "We didn't believe you!"

techrepublic
techrepublic

I use XP as I need to service customer computers. As a personal OS I only use Ubuntu Linux (YLMF) or Fedora. If I need a Windows session, I simply load one in VirtualBox! That resolves the problem companies like Netflix create when wanting to lock you into loading Silverlight which will only run in Windows. Otherwise, I have no virus or spyware garbage and the system is faster than any Windows OS. I LOVE MS only because if it were not for the problems they create, I would not have a job! I would starve if Linux or Apple were the only game in town.

unhappyuser
unhappyuser

Forever and ever, and next year too! :-)

kjkjlaut
kjkjlaut

We are very slowly, through attrition bringing Windows 7 Pro to our users. Some testers are using 7 Ultimate. Still probably over 70% are on XP and 15% on Vista 64b Pro. They are ALL fine platforms for our applications.

Nunob
Nunob

We actually focus primarily on the Hospitality industry and we use Windows POS Ready 2009. On the surface it appears to be XP Professional but if you dig deeper it really is different on several different fronts. I will add that as soon as the embedded version of 7 becomes available we will be switching to it.

sk.dunnage
sk.dunnage

You assume that a switch will occur.

Orodreth
Orodreth

The poll are interesting. By far Windows XP Pro out paces other installations, my guess due to existing hardware platforms. The trend does seem to move towards Pro or better, although Windows 7 Home Premium is more than enough for the corporate desktop. While BitLocker in Windows 7 Ultimate would be great for corporate users with critical data on their laptops, it probably not needed by the average secretary's desktop. Of course, laptops, servers and desktops of IT professionals should be Windows 7 Pro or Ultimate but I don't see a need for the bulk of corporate users to migrate to Windows 7 Pro or Ultimate, making IT department roll out group policies for each new install, turning off features, etc.

seanferd
seanferd like.author.displayName 1 Like

Well, how many new tips are available for XP? Comments regarding lack of tips for XP indicate an inability to search for 10 years of accumulated information. And if the tip simply does not apply to some OS or version, then it doesn't apply. What can be done about it? There are gazillions of sites for tweaking and customizing "home"-type Windows editions. And TR is, indeed, a site for IT professionals (regardless as to how many visitors and peers who, like myself, are not IT pros). I can only suggest, perhaps, a clear "applies to:" list at the head or foot of the article.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

I see no reason to 'upgrade' until I can no longer get drivers for new hardware. There is nothing business about 7 - it's all eye-candy and change for the sake of change.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer like.author.displayName 1 Like

but I don't see a reason to retrofit a new system with XP when it came in the door with W7 (and it's drivers) already in place.

SerrJ215
SerrJ215

My ogranization is almost completly windows 7, but my organization is rather small. Most of my clients are still tunning windows XP. (Mostly on advice of mine not to jump into Vista back when it came out)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Mostly XP Pro, although we've rolled out a few 7 Pro systems.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Tell us why you chose your particular edition of Windows.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

We're preparing to roll-out Windows-7 on an organizational level this year. Finally, 7 is beginning to approach the stability and reliability of XP. Microsoft has a long history of releasing OSs before they are debugged, and it costs money to have employees sitting around doing nothing because their system crashed. Vista never really got to the "stable" level before MS turned its attention to 7. Like ME a decade ago, Vista was a stepping stone that ended up being a stumbling block in the path. Instead of "feeling the need" to upgrade just because Microsoft had something new, we chose to wait until the new offering reached a solid level of acceptance by the general user community. So we "refrained" from upgrading immediately, instead choosing to remain on the stable XP platform until the next generation was ready. Vista never made it. 7 did, and we're moving forward now - AFTER Microsoft has done the debugging.