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Poll: Which version of Microsoft Office is most prominent in your organization?

What is your office suite right at this moment and what are your plans for Microsoft Office in the future?/

For the past few weeks, TechRepublic members have been discussing the pros and cons and ins and outs, of Microsoft Office 2013. Many are perplexed by the subscription model Microsoft is trying so hard to get us to accept. Some are concerned about the security implications of a cloud-enabled productivity suite, while others still lament over the continued prominence of the ribbon interface.

However, there are many who have adopted Office 2013 wholeheartedly and cannot understand the vitriol exhibited by TechRepublic members when debating Microsoft's latest productivity suite.

All of this back and forth makes choosing whether to deploy Office 2013, Office 365, or stick with your current version a difficult task.

Current version

It is that last choice that we want to get at with the following polls. Which version of Microsoft Office is most prominent in your organization? I am sure there are several versions of Office installed within many organizations, but we are looking to find out which version is the most prevalent at this moment in time.

And which version does your organization plan to acquire next? Are you skipping just one version or several? Does the new licensing scheme for Office 2013 change your intentions?

Also read:

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

36 comments
simonschilder
simonschilder

is not worth switching. The integration with skydrive is unwanted in our company as is the integration with outlook.com. And like someone before said: the color scheme doesn't make it more accessible.. Having said that...Office 2013 is not a bad product, by no means, but not worth switching from 2007 or 2010

shel-10
shel-10

MS Office products have always been full of "bloat". But, 2003 and 2010 are very reliable. Why ruin great products with a Cloud strategy. The type of work most of your MS Office customers do won't lend it self to an entertainment device, or a small viewing area tablet. Microsoft must be using marketing consultants who are simply telling the king that he wearing clothes!

northca707@gmail.com
northca707@gmail.com

I'll continue to use Office 2010 as long as it is viable. After that, it will be Open Office or something else. It will not be a Microsoft product. Microsoft's hostility toward its users will be reciprocated. Windows 8 is a total failure and the licensing terms of Office 2013 are a declaration of war on users. Office 365 is totally not viable as I have no intention of paying yearly for software, a price which, undoubtedly will increase and continue to increase.

tonycopp
tonycopp

Will Bill Gates vaccines include a perfect utility to read DOCX files? The rest of the world don't need the docx default, or the xlsx. Microsoft bought great goods to license from visi-calc, fox, long ago and has been spending more time drilling holes and putting locks in it that only they can fix. I think he got the jones to remake the Edsel in his image that somehow you are forced to guy no matter how loaded with useless but self-serving attachments and fee portals.

dgood
dgood

I put Office 2013 on all my own work PCs to test it out and have to say I'm a convert. The best features for me were saving to SkyDrive as easy as saving anywhere else and wwesome synchronization with Outlook 2013 and my outlook.com email. These features, with the calendar etc. are enough to have me moving all my company's PCs to Office 2013. As I have a Windows phone 8 (Ativ S) and am getting a Surface Pro this weekend I guess you could say I've bought into the Microsoft eco-system. It works for me and I'm very happy with it. I even like the look better but that's purely subjective...

mjc5
mjc5

To be assuming that everyone will be using Microsoft Office.My Group has switched to Open Office and hasn't looked back. What is more, we don't have to deal with changing interfaces like ribbons, or the rental software paradigm. I know Microsoft needs people to buy new software every couple years as that's their business model, but that model is assuming that the new software is the most important part of using an office suite. It isn't. It's the work you do with it. When someone can show me how the finished produce is superior, or makes more money by virtue of the changed softfare that is doin the same thing, I'll be all over that new software in a New York City minute. Until then, I've got more important things to do than get excited about it.

clapp
clapp

Our location is moving to Office 2013, so I am stuck with it. Personally, I have a red-blue color deficiency (not color blind - just a deficiency) and can barely see the difference between the pastels of Office 2013. Since it can't be changed, at home I'll use 2010 as long as i can, then go to Open Office.

governrcad
governrcad

I use Office 2007 only to allow me to read documents sent to me or downloaded from the Web. I have been using WordPerfect since the pre-Windows dinosaur era of DOS.

rjdbnet
rjdbnet

I installed Windows 8, multiboot with Windows 7. The Microsoft compatibility tool told me Office 2003 is not compatible, and I have to pay money to adapt Access 2007. I can buy Office 2013, and pay money to get Access running, so I can use Windows 8. If I figure out why I need to do that, I'll let you know.

Gisabun
Gisabun

I used 2003 for a long time. Briefly used 2007 and now at 2010. I don't see myself using 2013 except maybe to "support" friends and family. Since none i know use it, no rush to install. Wondering if Office 2013 is like previous licensing schemes where if you remove Office 2013 on one PC and then install on another, will the activation be straight forward. I'm surprised if Office is tyed to the PC. If so, use the KMS feature.

jm09
jm09

After looking into this new office, & talking with other companiies & people who tried it, our company is staying with 2010. We haven't had any problems or issues with our current version & don't want any. Basically we have not heard any good attibutes on this new version which is not good. Besides, the money they want to charge you to use it, you should own it.

tonycopp
tonycopp

Microsoft is a de-minimus content provider and licensing-rich operation. The only microsoft solution is to pay for 2003 and previous like 2001 XP and contract no further with their legal mishegas. Their support services are for supporting themselves with a value-free return.

mslizny
mslizny

Can't answer question as stated. Need another option: not yet decided

winntec
winntec

Have a mix of 2003 & 2007 and apart from the ribbon there's little difference. Absolutely no way would we go to 2013, the subscription model is hugely expensive and if a PC dies we move the licence to a new system. We would never trusts our info in the cloud and as our bandwidth is slow it wouldn't work anyway. Not all of us live in cities with fiber to the door.

sir.ptl
sir.ptl

I use 2007 and have no need for anything newer. Beside I'm not playing MS's games.

bmeyer66
bmeyer66

I returned to school to study IT in 2011 and bought the office 2010 for my computer for school as it was the best choice to match what was installed on the school systems. I am looking at what is offered in 2013 and find that it lacks several of the features that I have to have as a student for some of my classes. If I upgrade I must choose the 365 subscription as it is the only option that will allow me to have all the items that are in the student office 2010 so that I can do my work anywhere.

warp9.9
warp9.9

I currently support 18 different companies and the majority of them are using office 2003. I have only 4 that uses office 2007 and there is not much differences between 2003 and 2007 except the looks and where they have eliminated some things in 2007 that were helpful. I have one system with 2010 and the classroom in my shop has both 2007 and 2010 to provide training. I will not be upgrading or recommend upgrading if in some cases, I have recommended open office and also have that installed on the training systems for classes to use.

javerwokie
javerwokie

Is it just me or does Office 2013 look just like Office 2010 only with all the colour drained out of it. With windows 8 looking vibrant and colourful why make Office look bland and boring?

simonschilder
simonschilder

Imho Microsoft pushes too hard to get erverybody on Office 365. I'm a systems administrator in an environment with 40 pc's. We also use Office 200 to 2010 and are going to buy new pc's and new Ofiice installations. For us Office 365 is far to expensive since we use our pc's for more than 3 years in avg. Moreover we use document templates with a lot of vb programming and I am not sure Office 365 will support that seemlessly. Also I am wondering what bandwith I have to reserve for Office since it's running in the "cloud". And what do we do when the internet line goes down? Get a second internet line? That might help, except all the cables in this building are running through the same pipes out of the building. Office 2013 has the disadvantage that when you have to reinstall your pc for whatever reason you have to call Microsoft to be able to use the license again! Next thing they are going to use a telephone number which will cost >€0,90/minute for reactivation... Or did I just give them an idea :)

Walthy
Walthy

I happen to think Office 2013 as presented for the home user is exactly what I have been wanting for years. An annualized cost with support and more frequent updates and no large investment. I love the fact that I can use it in five home machines (I only have three at this point). If I had kids at home or in school, this would be very important. The fact that my wife and I can share our files and yet keep separate areas with backup storage on SkyDrive is great. Do I think the Office 2013 pricing and terms is smart? Absolutely not! Microsoft will kill Office 2013 if they don't change the terms to at least allow people to move the license to a new, replacement machine. And the office side? I'm not encouraged by what I see so far. The office/SMB versions that I've checked on so far don't look right. I don't think Microsoft prepared very well for the Business Edition of Office 365. If they will just follow the home version and allow a migration to a new machine and perhaps allow a second copy to be added to a mobile/notebook/tablet machine AND a desktop then they will be OK. Anything else is confusing and counterproductive and will lose business for them. I'm not too excited by what I've seen so far on that front. As a small business, we will just use the home edition license if we have to, just to get by, unless Microsoft changes its mind. Offices should be able to use a license on two machines, laptop and desktop (three if you count mobile) and any business should be able to do this for $99 per year, period. In our small business of 25 PCs in a retail environment, we would probably keep 7 to 8 licenses for our office staff, generating up to $800 per year for Microsoft forever. that's a whole lot more than they got from our upgrade to Office 2007 or anything before it. They would be stupid to do anything else and would probably drive us to use something else, which would also drive to another email solution from Exchange and Office 365 would also be dead and take Exchange with it. If they don't do something simple like this, then Ballmer needs to be fired, quickly!

Cat333Pokemon
Cat333Pokemon

I'm still only a student, but I have seen the significance of Office apply greatly in school, as well. In high school, the computers had a complete mix of versions of Office installed, anywhere from Office 97 to Office 2004 (the Mac version). Given the set of features introduced was minimal and most documents were compatible with all of those versions, it didn't really matter for school purposes. However, when Office 2007 came out, the Office Open (DOCX) format completely changed compatibilities. Many students (and some teachers) began to acquire 2007, which defaulted to the new format. Of course, there were lots of incompatibilities and some students had to resubmit their work in the traditional DOC format, while others were unable to work on their assignments during class or free time. It got to be such a mess that many of the computers had to have the free official converter installed, and all teachers were required to use it and accept submissions in both DOC and DOCX. Of course, that was also when many students had OpenOffice too, and teachers had a bit of fun trying to read the ODT files. The year after I graduated, I heard most of the computers were upgraded to Windows 7 with Office 2010. Now, in college, practically all of the school computers have Office 2010 installed, and most students have 2007, 2010, or a free alternative that supports the Office formats. It's a good thing Office 2010 supports DOC, DOCX, and ODT. Given how quickly they adopted 2010 and abandoned 2007, I'm sure I'll be seeing 2013 around campus in the coming year.

firstaborean
firstaborean

I currently have Office 2010 installed, but absolutely no intention of using any subscription software, except for security software, where it makes sense. I used to have Word 2002 installed, and I'd still prefer that, but that software would not reactivate on the new replacement computer, so I installed Office 2010 under Windows 7 Pro, and Word 97 under XP on the same computer. The latter is needed for compatibility with past work that involved Word 6.0 for DOS. This same computer also can boot into Ubuntu, which includes Libre Office, so no way will I be tripped up if Microsoft really goes insane for SAAS.

hometoy
hometoy

We mostly skipped Office 2007 from 2003 and jumped to 2010. Same thing with OSs, going XP to 7.

Oldsmobile_Mike
Oldsmobile_Mike

Our office (50 users) will be using Office 2003 until it's no longer supported with security updates, and probably beyond that. It still works, we're familiar with it, and our entire documents framework (including a large Access front-end to our SQL database) is built upon it. Between the complexity and retraining cost of switching, and the onerous licensing scheme, we'll be looking at various OpenOffice packages before we consider any of these future products from Microsoft.

Dukhalion
Dukhalion

There are very few new useful functions in the latest Office versions. I mean functions that You really need and actually would use on a regular basis. The Office package is mostly bloatware today, oversaturated with specialty functions that only one in a million needs. At work I use Office 2003 and at home 2000, and there is nothing in the 2003 version that I miss at home. Office has come the the end of the (upgrading) road. It's like buying a racingcar; nice, but of no practical use on our public roads.

rasilon
rasilon

Microsoft's insistence on tying a license to a single computer is likely to kill Office 2013, which I believe is their intent from the get-go. Frankly, I don't see the differences between 2010 and 2013 being significant enough to justify the expense. Hank Arnold (MVP)

dogknees
dogknees

As a business that works with outside corporations and governments, we really don't have a choice about moving. We also rely heavily on macros in our templates to ensure accurate results and a look and fell that meets corporate standards. While it is possible to convert these into full applications, the cost is unreasonable. If the market could produce compatible suites that are 100% compatible, including macro code, there would be an alternative. At the moment, there doesn't appear to be any. As I work on budgets among other things, I know the cost of Office licenses is not as onerous as many think. Wages and other costs trump far out-way them.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

If you are looking to migrate to a newer version of Microsoft Office or possibly to some alternative suite (Google Apps, LibreOffice, etc.), what is your timetable? Has the new licensing scheme accelerated or decelerated your plans?

rjdbnet
rjdbnet

Re: "It's the work you do with it." Ah, yes! That's why IBM squashed competitors. While IBM's competitors bragged how fast their computers could read punched cards, or how many instructions they could execute in one second, IBM bragged how many payroll checks their computers could print in an hour, or how many inventory items they could handle. They knew what their customers did, and they sold them the abililty to do it. Microsoft's Windows 8 fails to improve my ability to run Office, search, read email, or reply to bloggers. In fact, it would interefere with my ability to run Office 2003.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

They squared off the corners too. I find the less colorful version a bit harder to use. There isn't enough differentiation between the parts of the window for me to easily locate tools and features.

mattohare
mattohare

The OpenOffice platform went to LibreOffice. I tried Libre for eighteen months, and it was an annoying failure. Its database replacement for MS-Access was a complete failure (no docs and the functionality is only good for basic mailmerge). Some of the basic search & replace functionality that I needed in MS-Word was just not there. Less important but more annoying is that some keystrokes combinations could be quite messy. I forget the exact combination, but one went from selecting a large part of a worksheet to deleting it. I was more glad for the Undo feature than I was for any new functionality. Be ready for a lot of stress from your 50 users as they try to get used to the change. I suggest a training course by professionals to help them make the transition.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Then you will have to deal with probably document incompatability as well as training on how to use the other office package. As well, support will be limited. For example, if you wanted to migrate from Windows Live Mail to Outlook, dozens of links show up. You won't get the dozens with OpenOffice - which means those results you do get *may* not be accurate.

Michaelss
Michaelss

@rasilon: There are many options for Office licensing and there has been since 2007. You speak of only one method and one of the cheapest ones, the OEM license key for Office suites installed at the factory by OEMs, and it is the ONLY version that is tied to the hardware. There are several other more flexible choices, the Full Packaged Product boxed disk and license, several Open License options and now the subscription models under Office365 plans. All have pro's and con's depending on what fits your business or personal needs appropriately. All of which are NOT tied to hardware. M.Bell SMB Specialist

the_tech_mule
the_tech_mule

We'll likely use Office 2010 for a long time to come. I see no reason to upgrade past it at this time. We skipped Office 2007 so we'll skip Office 2013 and likely another version after that. What will be interesting is what will happen with future versions of Windows and compatibility with Office 2010. If Office 2010 isn't supported in Windows 9+, then perhaps we'll begin looking to alternatives at that point. There's really nothing keeping us to MS Office at all since other than the simplicity of sharing documents with other companies.

Jeremy Barker
Jeremy Barker

The only reasonably flexible option is volume licensing which is (AFAIK) only available for 5+ licenses. That's not a problem for the business I work in where we have over 20 PCs but for a home user or micro business with 2 or 3 PCs it's useless. With Office 2013 FPP has effectively been abolished making all that can be purchased outside the volume licensing channel is either one that is like OEM on previous versions or the subscription-based Office365. In addition the restrictions on transferring the OEM-style licenses seem to have been tightened to only allow transfers where the computer is replaced under warranty rather that effectively any breakdown replacement. None of this is good news. Although I still use Office 2000 on my own computer at home I am unlikely to install any version of Office on the next computer I own.

bennettexpress
bennettexpress

Will not work with WIN 7 or 8 Forced to upgrade with newer system...