Windows 8

Poll: Will Microsoft Windows 8 be deployed in your enterprise?

It is time we stop beating around the bush: Will Microsoft Windows 8 be deployed in your enterprise?

I have a bone to pick with some very prominent technology journalists about Microsoft Windows 8 and their obsession with declaring the operating system a failure before it is even released to manufacturing. While I respect these journalists, many of which I have been following for years, for their knowledge and insight when it comes to trends in technology, I think they are off the mark when it comes to Windows 8.

More than units sold

When I see Leo Laporte, John C. Dvorak, Gina Smith, and others already declaring Windows 8 a failure based solely on their perception that Microsoft will not sell many upgrade units, I cannot help but think that they are missing a key reason for Windows 8's very existence.

Credit to: icanhascheezburger.com

I agree, neither enterprises nor consumers are going to upgrade their Windows 7 (or XP for that matter) PCs to Windows 8 in great numbers. (Although at $40, they probably should.) There is no overwhelming reason for anyone to change their desktop operating system to Windows 8. Microsoft understands this and it is not how the company will measure its success. Microsoft is not really selling a new operating system; they are selling a new technology ecosystem.

It is not Windows 8 that will determine the future success or failure for Microsoft; it is the success or failure of the Microsoft Store that will determine the company's ultimate fate. I have to believe Microsoft is looking at a long term strategy of creating a market for selling Metro-based apps. Windows 8 is just another operating system; Apps are the real future.

Microsoft is going to compete with Google, Apple, and to a lesser extent Amazon and Facebook for what is essentially the future of software delivery - an apps ecosystem. And in this arena, Microsoft actually has tremendous potential because they have a foot in the enterprise door already. These five companies, and few other less-defined as of yet players, are creating systems that will lock in users to long-term commitments to their services - long-term lucrative commitments.

IT pros and the ecosystem

IT professionals on TechRepublic have been quick to accept the potential for deploying phones, tablets, and PCs all using a similar, familiar, and manageable operating system. They understand the benefits of being in a committed vendor relationship and they also understand the drawbacks.

Of course, these professional are careful people and they want to explore that potential before making commitments, but they are not shying away from the concept. In fact, our poll results show they are looking forward to testing it. A result that seems to discount what many technology experts have been saying.

The ultimate question

At least this has been my perception these past few months as Windows 8 has moved through the preview stages. But in light of what so many technology journalists are saying, I think it is time we stop beating around the bush put the ultimate question directly to TechRepublic members.

I'd also like to get some insight on the Windows 8 decision making process. I think your IT professional peers would benefit from seeing how you are approaching the potential deployment of Windows 8 in your enterprise. What are the pros and cons of Windows 8? What is the main concern? What is the major perceived benefit? Is the technology press too quick to dismiss Windows 8? Do you agree with me that the real measure of success is going to be whether the Microsoft ecosystem is adopted or rejected?

Also read:

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

56 comments
cesardlg
cesardlg

I'm all for innovation but this is radically different. How the heck can I roll this out? it would involve intense training for every single person. It's too different. I get what Microsoft is doing but I can't imagine rolling this out on any kind of large scale. they would kill the IT people.

joshwillis
joshwillis

As the sysadmin for our company, I see NO value add to justify going through the support headache of rolling out the abomination that is the metro UI to our users. Windows 7 is a great product and we'll be sticking with it for the foreseeable future.

tsadowski
tsadowski

This poll is too black and white. For example I don't think I will ever be deploying Windows 8 on Desktops or Laptops, However it MIGHT be deployed if we ever get Surface tablets in. I definitely see the benefit in having a Microsoft tablet integrated into my AD instead of trying to shoehorn in an iDevice or android (although androids work better). But being able to install my Windows only VPN client on a Microsoft tablet and having full office from it, would be pretty slick. However the Metro UI will never fly on traditional computers. Period. So if the question is will we ever deploy Windows 8 on traditional computers and laptops in our org, hell no. Will we consider deploying it on tablets, yes.

USBPort1
USBPort1

Maybe if MS gave IT pros a free fully licensed copy I would be willing to try 8. I just got 7 last year so I see no reason to jump to 8. I think most IT people look at 8 like they did Vista - why all the redesign for the enterprise? We need minimal flash and a way more secure and stable OS. Just rearranging the GUI and making it harder to do everyday tasks just doesn't cut it. I'm afraid that 8 just might go the way of Vista. If it had come out several years after Vista and 7 had never come out, then maybe it would be a different story. Most companies I know just got 7 going so most are in no hurry to jump to 8 anytime soon.

Ken Dally
Ken Dally

Working in a Government Department where we are just in very early stages of deploying Windows 7 I don't see us using Windows 8 for multiple reasons. Once we have a new SOE we wil have it for at the very least 4 years to tie in with our replecement PC cycle. The interface is so radically different we would need a big training program whcih we have no money for. The touch screen interface is appalling on a desktop and even frustrating at times on a touch enabled device. We certainly cannot aford the increased cost of moving to touch screen devices. At home I've been running the pre-release on a touch enabled laptop and ended up googling a patch to bring back the Windows 7 interface. With the way most people work I don't like how native apps go full screen only. This would have to be my biggest gripe it's ludicrious. Too much stuff is hidden away with no indication on where to find menus and options. Basically I think the metro interface sucks and so does everyone I know who has tired to use it.

T3CHN0M4NC3R
T3CHN0M4NC3R

I know there are already a lot of posts on 9gag, memebase, etc that jokes about Windows releases but really, you have to try it before judging. I also acknowledge that there are some quirkiness getting used to the new MetroUI and not able to find some old stuff. But didn't we had the same experience when moving from XP to Win7? We are IT professionals and it's our job to figure it out. End users/business users will not care about the advanced settings. All they want is being able to run their apps and do what they need to. Really, Windows 8 has totally amazed me with the presentation of MetroUI/"The new Start Menu" and it's performance. Articles will not be enough to describe it. Best thing for you guys to do is to download the consumer preview, install it on your spare machines in your IT department, test it out yourself and share the experience with some of your colleagues. It's really that good. It just need some getting used to.

Dasec
Dasec

As an ex employee and now part time consultant, I test and deploy software for VPN capability within a large corporation for use on both Corporate and Home owned Windows PC's. As soon as Windows 8 is released there will be an expectation from Home Users that we will have VPN ready for Tablets, Desktops or Laptops. For this reason I have already installed Windows 8 on a Laptop and am waiting for the vendors to get the VPN software ready.

scion111
scion111

I agree with Darren B ("If Win8 doesn't change, neither will we..."). I've been using the preview of Win8 and actually like it - it's pretty good on my (no touch screen) desktop and I think it would be great on a tablet. I also think it would be a home run IF Microsoft simply allowed you to just toggle into a Win7 desktop environment. Why Microsoft does not see the obvious benefit of allowing the END USER to decide between Metro and Desktop (and possibly getting way more consumer and business converts) is beyond me...

goberkofler
goberkofler

...both are congenial, if they are placed on a separate system & new - old without any ballast! I test this at present and can not comment negative...!

hrosita
hrosita

I fully agree with you about the new sayers. I am a senior citizen (female) and I installed Windows 8 on my laptop as soon as it was available. I like it because I like new things and find getting used to new ways to use software keeps my young. I am also sure that Windows 9 will be accepted very quickly by the young generation that walks around with the IPADs and Android tablets. I see how easily they adapt to smart phones and other new appliances. As long as Windows 8 is fast and does not crash, it will gain use over the next two years. And just let a new device come out that will only be supported by Windows 8 and there be massive upgrades.

ptorr
ptorr

I never just jump and install new software. Always conduct controlled and isolated testing and watch for feed back from the IT Community.

sysop-dr
sysop-dr

People are already bringing their own devices to work. Our BoD and senior execs are bringing their own Apple machines to the company and insisting that IT support them. There is no reason to believe that at least one of them will not bring in a Windows 8 laptop or desktop. And while us lowly serfs are supposed to only use the company standard we have 20% of the science staff using Linux only and I have already seen people running Windows 8 previews on the network. I suspect that every business that doesn't treat their workers as children will have the same thing. As long as it is secure, free of viruses and can interact with other users, servers and get the job done without causing others problems, go for it. And if any of our clients, (we do a lot of stuff and write a lot of software used by nuclear science, nuclear stations and medical science world wide), end up going to use windows 8 or windows 8's server version, then we will have to run and test on that platform. So at least some of us will be required to use it, and that will open the floodgates and it will be on some significant number of users desktops or laptop/tablets very soon.

the_tech_mule
the_tech_mule

If I were buying inexpensive apps or purchasing one off apps for some of my users, I can see purchasing through the Microsoft ecosystem. However, I have some apps that are big ticket items (e.g., AutoDesk CAD products) where I have existing licensing agreements with AutoDesk. I also have numerous cloud services with local app components. While I might purchase MS Office through the store, I would only do it if it provided a better cost than through existing methods. If Microsoft heavily discounts Office and their other products to push people to the store, their going to screw their resellers, which is not in the their best interest. The Microsoft Store will be effective for consumers and for tablet apps for business. I don't see either of those markets having a big impact on how my business does IT for the foreseeable future. I do see the potential use of Windows 8 tablets for some specialized purposes but it won't be a substantial part of out IT investment, that still sits squarely on the desktop.

sonnystarks
sonnystarks

Mr. Kaelin, do you have a vested interest? It seems to me Leo Laporte, John C. Dvorak, Gina Smith, are keeping the business and personal side in perspective. My corporation of 2500 people are in the business of managing a worldwide corporate chain. We do not access our computers to chat, socialize or play games. We access them to communicate via email (yes, some professional corporations still require and use email. (.gov: need I say more?)). We use portable phones to make telephone calls. We are only now giving up XP because we are forced to. Yes, we are upgrading to Win7 but Mr. Kaelin, explain to us why you think our, or any other corporate operation, would benefit by upgrading to a finger touch (we do a LOT of keyboarding to communicate), and pretty little box program list, operating system?

puppadave
puppadave

Just came back from the doctors - - Guess what was on the sceen on the exam room monitor - - YEP, your right - - XP Pro!!!

Darren B - KC
Darren B - KC

In answer to the query of "ever" moving to Windows 8, I can say that IF Windows 8 were to remain in it's current state, the answer is a confident "No". The more-or-less removal of the standard desktop and Start menu and forcing the use of the so-called "Metro" interface for desktop PCs, is an inexscusable blunder of colossal proportions, and, in my mind, instantly tagged Windows 8 with fluorescent sticker on the box stating quite simply "NOT A REAL OPERATING SYSTEM!". In the long highway that is Microsoft's history (and future), this new OS, as it stands now, would be the equivilent of a large sign on the side of that highway that says, "Danger - Bridge Out Ahead", with a smaller sign, barely readable, underneath it that quietly states, "Made possible by Windows 8 and the Metro interface." What I expect to see in the near future, is a new sign going up at the edge of the gaping chasm that says "New Bridge project coming soon! - Courtesy of Apple and Android." Why MS can't make a version of Windows 8 for desktop PC's and power users who don't wish to use the Metro interface is beyond my comprehension. I've never witnessed such blatant ignorance on Microsoft's part and what appears to be COMPLETE disregard for the concerns and disires of it's customers. I'm a die-hard MS supporter going on 30 years with PC's exclusively, and I LOVE Windows 7, but after seeing where Windows 8 is going, about all I can do is throw up my hands in resignation and say, quite honestly, F*** you, Microsoft.

pbug56
pbug56

Who needs Win 8 in the Enterprise? If Microsoft comes out with a Point of Sale version, then fast food places could use it. If anyone ever bought a Microsoft Windows phone (why would they), this might work. And for the few people who buy tablets / pads who don't want either the me me me pad (ipad) or an Android pad, sure. Now let's say you work in an office. You have to have a spreadsheet open, email, and a word doc. You need to see them all at the same time. Oops, Metro's real big on having an app take up the whole screen, not sharing screen space with others. Also, your users have been using Windows XP and 7 for years, and regardless of each, are fairly comfortable with a keyboard and mouse based GUI. Oops - Metro is for touch screens - which are a lot more expensive, especially in larger sizes. So of most users don't have touch screens, then Metro is even more useless. Oh, you don't have to use Metro. There is still a desktop hidden away. Kind of. Badly crippled. And MS has sworn to swat away any attempts to restore Win 7 type functionality. I've got no clue why, except to wonder what some Marketeer has been smoking or sniffing. Or, if the IT bosses want to stick to what their users are comfortable with, what actually works for their businesses, Win 7 will be around even longer then XP, unless MS goes to a rehab center and backs off on forcing Metro on Win 8 users and allows easily done settings to put back the full Win 7 interface. Then, I'd consider recommending Win 8 because underneath and in certain tools it has some nice improvements that I'd really like to have - if I can get them without the Metro nonsense.

n2add
n2add

Unless you are strictly a computer hobbyist, you buy a computer to get things done. If changing the OS facilitates this, it makes sense to change it. If it does not, there is little reason to incur the cost in money and time to change it. Why did XP succeed so well. Part of the reason was the Vista debacle but another reason is that it worked well on a majority of systems in use or contemplated. Plus both M$ and third parties were able to make existing as well as new applications work with it. The company I retired from used a text-based Unix-based OS for much of their day-to day operations. When we switched from green-screen dumb terminals to PC's, we did not spend the money to convert our business software to Windows. We used a Windows terminal emulator as a means to access the software.

Beejer
Beejer

Our organization is only now starting to plan our migration to Windows 7, forced by the 2014 EOL of XP. It's unlikely we'll be moving to another version of Windows any time soon.

Jaytmoon
Jaytmoon

There is no real advantage to "upgrade" to Win8, imho. With most enterprise environs firmly entrenched in XP and Win 7 (no linux pundits please) and no applications available that offer any substantial productivity improvements or touch screens that rival standard display screen pricing, Win 8 is going to tank like Win me. Oh yes, we did test the release candidate and found it less than stellar, to say the least.

seggsyuk
seggsyuk

I am only half way through deploying Win7, and am meeting stern resistance from my users who have no wish to learn something new when, what they have is doing the job just fine and they are comfortable with it. I will never say never but the thought of trying to teach my bunch of luddites and technophobes Windows 8 doesn't bear thinking about......

pdegroot
pdegroot

I don't think it's time to stop beating around the bush. It's not even time to start beating around the bush. There's nothing in the bush yet. So many contradictions in this piece. Maybe that's what you get for beating an empty bush. Let me take just one. "I agree, neither enterprises nor consumers are going to upgrade their Windows 7 (or XP for that matter) PCs to Windows 8 in great numbers." The OS upgrade rate is a critical indicator of value, since it establishes, very simply, that the new software is sufficiently better than the old software to make it worthwhile to upgrade. The scenario you are describing here is the Vista scenario. Most businesses never bought Vista. They bought PCs that had Vista on them. About 2/3s of the time, they replaced Vista with Windows XP. This fact is based on a 20% run rate for PC replacement that should have brought Vista to about 60% of the installed base in three years, when it actually never broke 20% of the installed base according to surveys of what businesses were actually using. So there was not only no upgrade business, but more businesses downgraded (to XP) than stayed with the installed product (Vista). This is called burning the bush to the ground and still not finding the animal. No meat AND no berries. About half of enterprises are still running XP. Those companies cannot run Office 2013. They cannot run IE 10. They cannot run Metro apps. If Windows 8 does no more than happen to ship on new PCs, it stalls the app business. There's a huge overhang of XP in business, and if most businesses upgrade to Windows 7 (which half have already done; that fact has already been beaten out of the bush) the entire app business you're talking about will never happen, since Windows 7 doesn't run Metro.

carpetking
carpetking

I think it is far to early in the game to say that Windows 8 would 'Never' be installed at your business. Just like so many people told me, "... you can never go wrong in buying realestate...". I flushed a good chuck of my IRA down the crapper trying to stay our house while un-employement ravaged our household!

sarai1313
sarai1313

i will be just screamed at by the same "I.T" persons who tell me i can spell or my thinking is screw up. so you all have a nice day and live in your dearm world were you think you opion maters to any one but your little clik.I have real work to do taking cair of sick and dieing faimly.

Tank-at-Large
Tank-at-Large

I am finding enterprises, the really large ones like I got consumed by, move really slowly in this type of endeavor. We are just now adopting Windows 7 and Office 2010...now you want me to consider Windows 8 and Office 2013 with all the new concepts.....

simonh
simonh

This blog/forum/whatever is generally populated by stick-in-the-mud conservative IT 'professionals' for whom the idea of progress is how much quicker they can get home. They'd all still be using W2K with Office 97 if the businesses their organisation associated with had not demanded compatibility with Office 03 or heaven forbid, Office 07!

Bengt
Bengt

Having made a bare-metal installation of Win 8 pre-release on a five year old hp laptop I can only say that it was an amazing experience - it just worked. Not a question avout finding out-of-date drivers etc etc. The result is superb - small (less than 16 GB) and fast. Having spent an hour to learn how to master Metro the old desktop looks decidedly dated although it still there with a single click on the Windows button. All old programs I need installed without a hitch, even the original Visi-calc from 1988 in DOS (just for fun, of course). The pro's I can see are - - Runs very well on old hardware (without touch screen of course) and fast. A real youth cure. - A smaller foot-print was welcome. I have also tried Office 2013, which is also a winner, especially on Win 8.

imsoscareed
imsoscareed

for an MS store to be successful selling Metro apps when there won't be enough sales of 8 to support the store. You make no sense, your so called logic contradicts itself.

GeoffH
GeoffH

Doubtful we'll see Win 8 in my time where I work, we're still deploying Win XP SP3 32bit :-(

Skruis
Skruis

I'm sure there are a few scenarios where an IT professional would have no reason to be interested in Windows 8 at all but the vast majority of professionals should at the very least try it if even to confirm their negative suspicions about the OS. I support very few Mac's but I still try to expose myself to the environment and the same goes for Linux, Android and iOS. It's our responsibility to base our recommendations on personal experience whenever possible.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Most of those responding have tried at least one of the three publicly available betas. Our comments are based on those experiences. Our job isn't just to figure out how to adapt to new technologies. It's also our job to advise or determine if they're worth the cost of adopting.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

for the vendors to create the VPN software, and what will you do if they don't? I also wonder how you'll manage if a person ends up with a unit that has Windows RT instead of the full Windows 8?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

they ALWAYS know what's best for you, and know it better than you (the user) knows. That's why they want a total vendor lock in, so they can control your computing experience for you.

joshwillis
joshwillis

We'd roll out Windows 8 if we could kill the metro UI.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

I state very clearly that I don't think enterprises are going to upgrade to Windows 8 because they really don't have any reason to do so. The difference I have with Leo, John, and Gina is that I don't think that is how we should measure the success of Windows 8. The sale of Windows 8 tablets, mobile devices and Metro Apps is going to be where the real success or failure will be measured.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

TOTAL COST OF CHANGE, this is what it costs them, all up, to change from Win XP to something else. Yes, Win 7 has a cut back virtual machine they call XP Mode, but it does NOT run all XP software properly. Many businesses have essential applications that cost a lot of money to buy that run on XP but will NOT run on Win 7 or Win 8. In some cases they have the opportunity to buy a newer copy to run on the newer version of Windows, but for many this is more than double the cost of replacing the computer systems; while others do not have that opportunity as the company making the software have not yet developed a new version to run on the newer versions of Windows. For many companies the inability to run their essential applications on the newer Windows means they literally CAN'T change the OS and stay in business.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

1. The impact on the business while changing, in both financial costs and time lost with the learning cycle; 2. The return on the investment, will the change offer enough higher productivity to justify the cost. If it doesn't then to change is an unnecessary cost. You don't NOT introduce change for change's sake since the money spent on a change that doesn't return a suitable return is a waste and may be just the difference between making a profit or going out of business. To be worthwhile, a change MUST provide some real benefit other than glitter or the wow factor of saying you have the latest.

blarman
blarman

and look to see what value it provides. To most businesses, having the latest and the greatest is simply a cost without any value. The OS is particularly vulnerable here, because businesses don't really care what OS is running - it is their business applications that matter! If the OS runs the applications as well as a previous OS, that's all we care about. It really doesn't matter how flashy or fancy things are on the OS-side because noone sits around going - oooh, look at how I can put a clock widget on my desktop! There is a point in the life-cycle of every product line that is "good enough". That was reached with Windows XP. You can tout the better security, etc. of 7 all you like, but again - does it affect how users run applications? No. There's also the minor factor of money - it costs a lot of time and effort to test, deploy and migrate to a new OS and train the users to use it. It is a cost with little or no appreciable ROI. The truth of the matter is that it has nothing to do with being a stick-in-the-mud or being anti-Microsoft, it has to do with being pro-business. And for most of us, it isn't making us money to move OS every time something new hits the market.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I haven't been able to find a site to download it.

imsoscareed
imsoscareed

I have tried it, that's how I've based my decision to never deploy Win8 in our enterprise. It's an OS for toys, to compete with the Ipad. It's not for business or even home users for that matter.

Dasec
Dasec

One of the 2 key pieces already works, the other is supposedly in Beta. What will I do if they don't, switch to a vendor who will of course. We haven't failed to provide VPN yet on any Windows version so failure is not a consideration.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

for and where the sales will be, however Microsoft will NOT be splitting the sales figures apart and saying which are desktops and which aren't. You can also be sure MS will be using the sales on tablets and mobile devices to say they still control the desktop sales and claim them as evidence they're doing well in enterprise sales too.

simonh
simonh

Since I took over the IT decisions here there has been a paradigm shift in how people use technology to enhance their business contribution. I push for adoption of the latest tech at all times. We signed up for a site-license for software assurance so we can keep up with minimum cost. We went from IT being viewed as a necessary evil to being central to the way everyone works. It has taken and continues to be a lot of effort to make sure the whole affected workforce is aware of how technology can benefit their role and how they can take advantage of it. Wit this we make a greater impact relative to our competitors. Rather than accept resistance to technology try and promote it as an enabler. Show people how it will benefit. Gradually the workforce begins to ask why we have not yet adopted this or that as they pay more attention to technology news. Help your people understand, don't just accept the argument of no change for the sake of it. Push for change. Most of our workforce is excited about Windows 8 especially since MS showed Surface. They want this more than any other product.

Skruis
Skruis

My point was that a competent IT professional would try it before dismissing it. The question asking about whether or not you would at least try it indicated for me at least that those IT professionals, at least the vast majority of them, that said 'no' were unfit for this field. You tried it. You sampled an Operating System from the primary PC Operating System manufacturer. You did your job and based your opinion on personal experience which will offer value to your clients and employers. Most of the respondents that said they wouldn't even try it are either employed in 100% Mac or Linux based shops, and are a minority among IT professionals, or unfit for this field.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

of the Microsoft Tablet with Windows 8 on. Microsoft have already said there will be a number of versions and only one will have the full blown Win 8 with full capability, the rest will be very much cut back affairs. From what MS have said, any tablet with Win RT (the ARM version of Win 8) will NOT have VPN capability: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_8_editions It's also clear that ONLY the Windows 8 Pro and Windows 8 Enterprise editions can join a Windows domain, so you need to be sure they get systems with those versions of Win 8. Thus they'll be top end units only, and much dearer than they expect.

blarman
blarman

You seem to take the tack that I haven't done this. That simply isn't true. The new Windows 8 interface does nothing valuable for MY users. My mobile users are all using Android phones. Everyone else uses a desktop, where the Metro interface frankly is more a hindrance than a help. Noone in my company is excited for Surface because it provides no value for us. Most of my company operates in rural farming towns where it's hard to get reliable Internet access even with a physical line. Wireless phone service can be spotty. Tablets and such to us are a huge waste of money without connectivity. Further, everyone who is pushing Surface forgets one minor little detail: most apps aren't built for use through a touchscreen interface. It's a completely different user experience than the keyboard/mouse. Not that it can't be really nice, but until the APPS themselves are built to use that paradigm of interface, the user is going to get frustrated very easily. Ever tried working on a spreadsheet from a tablet? What an utter time-waster. Editing documents isn't much better. Until ALL apps have a mobile version for touch-based interfaces, they aren't going to see widespread adoption.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I want to know why (as he says) "most of our workforce is excited about Windows 8 especially since MS showed Surface" and how this particular "technology can benefit their role and how they can take advantage of it". I ask because unless they are all planning to use tablets, or touch screen interefaces of some kind, I don't see any other added benefit or excitement for desktop users; neither I see how Windows 8 can really benefit my users' role when all they do is email, Word, Excel, RDP and AutoCAD. I also don't get the IT driving the business needs, instead of the other way around. Business needs dictate what is needed to be acomplished and then IT tries to find the best technological solution that at the same time does not bankrupt the business. It is not like you can walk into your CEO's office and say, "we should get 1000 new Surface tablets because with them all employees can now check the company's facebook account when they are watching TV". simonh, ever heard of a "business case"? ROI? Thanks,

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How are those netbooks working out for you? :-) Seriously, don't you risk investing in 'flash in the pan' technologies? Most companies got along just fine bypassing Vista. What's the downside to waiting on W8 deployment?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

tried the advanced versions made available by MS, like I have. In hopes of them making changes in response to the comments made so far, I'm prepared to try a copy of the final production version when it's out and one of my clients ends up with a copy. but I won't be using it myself unless they provide a version without Metro that has a basic PC style initial interface.

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