Windows 8 optimize

Rejected: 74% of organizations have no plans to deploy Windows 8

TechRepublic's Windows 8 Business Intentions study reveals that 74% of businesses have no plans to deploy Windows 8, and the new, touch-centric user interface is a driving factor in the decision.

Microsoft Windows chief Steven Sinofsky has described Windows 8 as “a generational change” the likes of which hasn’t been made since Windows 95. With Windows 8, Microsoft hopes to move its flagship OS beyond the PC into the fast-growing tablet market. But, according to TechRepublic Pro and ZDNet research, Microsoft hasn't convinced many IT decision makers that Windows 8 is an essential OS upgrade.

In October 2012, we asked TechRepublic members to share with us their organization's plans for Windows 8. Over 1,200 people responded, and we compiled the data into our Windows 8 Business Intentions report. The following are five key takeaways from the report.

  • 73.7 percent of respondents say their organizations have no plans to deploy Windows 8, with 23.8 percent reporting that they will skip the OS altogether. By comparison, a 2009 ScriptLogic survey (PDF) found that 59.3 percent of 1,100 respondents had no current plans to deploy Windows 7.

  • Only 15.8 percent of respondents who run Windows XP or an earlier version as their organization’s primary OS say they plan to deploy Windows 8. This is far below the 29.7 percent of those running Windows 7 and the 50 percent of those running Windows Vista who plan to deploy Windows 8.

  • Security and tablet/mobile integration top the list of factors rated important by respondents who plan to deploy Windows 8. 61.2 percent of respondents rated tablet/mobile integration a 4 or 5 in importance.
  • The Windows 8 style UI and associated end-user training requirements are off-putting to many respondents. 41.4 percent of respondents rated the Metro user interface (now called the Windows 8 style or Modern style UI) as very important to their company's decision not to deploy Windows 8. Open-ended responses from those without plans to deploy Windows 8 further illustrate respondents' concerns with the new UI.

  • The number of respondents in Australia, Canada, Europe, and the US with plans to deploy Windows 8 was lower than in China, India, and Southeast Asia. Of all the regions, the US was lowest, with just 24.6 percent of respondents reporting current deployment plans.

These are just a few of the data points the study uncovered. The full Windows 8 Business Intentions: Deployment Plans, Driving Factors, Roadblocks, and Strategies includes the following:

  • A breakdown of Windows 8 deployment plans by organization size, primary geographic location, and industry sector
  • An in-depth look at the factors important in the decision to deploy Windows 8, such as upgrade price, administration tools, and cloud integration
  • Additional analysis of the driving factor behind the decision not to deploy Windows 8, such as time, resource, and budget constraints
  • A look at the business leaders involved in making the Windows 8 deployment decision
  • A complete breakdown of deployment strategies -- staggered, mass deployment, or hardware refresh
  • Information on the percentage of computers that organizations will move to Windows 8
Download the full Windows 8 Business Intentions report.

More TechRepublic Pro original research on the horizon

TechRepublic Pro, TechRepublic's premium service, provides information that IT leaders need to solve today's toughest IT problems and make informed decisions. The Windows 8 Business Intentions: Deployment Plans, Driving Factors, Roadblocks, and Strategies report is the first of many original pieces of research we're working on. In the coming months, we'll look at big data, machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, SMB IT innovation, managing a mobile enterprise, and more.

While Windows 8 Business Intentions is free for all TechRepublic and ZDNet members, future reports will be reserved for TechRepublic Pro members or available for one-off purchase through the TechRepublic store. Visit www.techrepublic.com/pro for information on becoming a member.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

270 comments
john_xena
john_xena

Re the W8 Pro / 8.1 GUI I simply install and use IOBit StartMenu8 software - with many thanks IOBit for this astounding piece of 3rd party software. Love it, returns the FULL Start Button / Menu to W8 Pro / 8.1.


All user interaction is as per normal and everyone is happy 100%, return the GUI on a Monday morning as a surprise and the complaints roll in think and fast - a nice little joke t play lol :)


Even if I don't use the touch side of W8 it is there and ready one day. The Metro GUI and removal of Start Button / Menu was and is the biggest killer of uptake with W8. Let's see if W9 has the Start Menu fully 100% restored not this current gimmick Star Button.

Viktor_f
Viktor_f

Win 7 and Win 8 - have no big difference for the user. From the financial side it will costs enormous to update licenses on all apps for Win 8. For the enterprises is better to update OS once in a ten year when technology goes directly ahead.

Trentski
Trentski

The how important were the following factors in your organisations decision not to deploy Windows 8, some of the reasons are just bs dual screen support is exactly the same as Windows 7, wtf? If a test demo was done, the users would like it, especially the noobs, who like glossy new things Its only good for tablets and handhelds? Just a bunch of people that have barely touched the new OS from the sounds of things

Tim Acheson
Tim Acheson

"74% of organizations have no plans to deploy Windows 8" Lies, damned lies, and statistics. Using statistics to misrepresent the facts exposes this as another anti-Microsoft propaganda article from Tech Republic. The 74% figure refers to "current plans" in contrast to long-term strategy. Adoption of new versions of Windows is always slow. Windows 7 has only just overtaken Windows XP as the most popular OS, after a decade and despite Win 7 being the fastest-selling OS of all time! A PC is built to last. A PC purchased five to ten years ago is still as useful today as it was then. There is no pressing need to upgrade.

jdm12
jdm12

GM, Ford, or whoever has released a new model either. The most compelling reason for everyone to upgrade ended more than a decade ago. For the most part, the stuff works. If the new version enhanced the bottom line, that would be the reason to invest in the upgrade. If my workers become more productive with a tablet, that's a reason to invest. So far, I'm not seeing the advantage for more than 25 percent of businesses and government agencies to do so.

hrosita
hrosita

How many PC's (in numbers) are represented by the percentages? In my opinion, 24.6% of responders willing to upgrade in the US is quite significant. After all, when a new car (or any new merchandise) is advertised how many people will upgrade in the first year? Rosita

carlsf
carlsf

We have ditched Microsoft all together. We have gone Linux flavor ZORIN, "http://zorin-os.com/premium.html" and have been very surprised, the interface looks and acts like WIN7. The whole package including all 4 suite together on 1 DVD along with shipping NZ$50.00 this includes a whole range of application software including an Office suite. To go MS WIN8 and Office 2010 F/P cost NZ$850.00 per seat and ZORIN NZ$50.00 work that out a saving of $700.00 per seat oner 115 seats on great saving on out balance sheet.

leeric
leeric

OK folks, I am a realist here. What I see to fully support Win8 is a whole sale replacement of all my LCD monitors. I can either replace them all at once, or over a 4 year replacement cycle of our 300 computer units. Either way, in the end, I am going to be filling the landfill with 600 LCD's. If the industry had been smart, they would have ceased production on non-touchscreen LCD's a year or two back and been forcing touchscreen capable monitors on us since then as standard feature. LCD's tend to last long time, and as such, as we bought new larger units in the computer replacement cycle, we just added the larger to the existing smaller to end up with dual displays on each workers desktop. In the most recent year or so, we haven't been ordering LCD's at all, just new computers. It's going to be a hard sell to get me to buy 600 new LCD's and trash 600 perfectly working LCD's just to upgrade to Win8. I suspect most business environments will have the same attitude as I. I don't think Win8 is going to take off on the average employee's desktop. Win8's success will only be in the public sector, where many are looking to abandon their desktop computer for a laptop/notepad/etc for greater portability anyway.

gevander
gevander

There is are reasons so many enterprises are stil using WinXP - among them are [ul][*] Corporate conservatism [/ul] [ul][*] Platform stability [/ul] [ul][*] Platform history [/ul] [ul][*] Cost of upgrade to new vs cost of support for existing [/ul] [ul][*] Many others [/ul] The "duh" bullets in that list are "Platform stability and history." Win8 [b]has no history[/b] which makes it an unknown for stability. Microsoft can say whatever it wants about the OS's capabilities, but they have no enterprise data to back it up. The only enterprises that will upgrade now, or have a plan to upgrade soon, are either "bleeding edge" companies (who always want to be first adopters of anything) or places with a 100% Windows environment and a willingness to throw money at the upgrade. So, yeah, 3/4 of businesses "have no plans" to upgrade to Win8. Duh.

Sid4
Sid4

Installed Windows 8 on my netbook, easy as pie. Unfortunately not one of the new apps on the initial screen after bootup, except the one that takes you to the old desktop (without a start button) will run on a display with a resolution under 1024 x 768. Since my netbook is 1024 x 640 I was out of luck. Interesting Microsoft doesn't mention that..

Tekkz
Tekkz

Saying the OS was "rejected" because 74% of the respondents had no plans to upgrade is just skewing words. From the chart above: "49% have no current plans to deploy Windows 8, but may reconsider redeployment in the future" That's not rejected, that's careful business strategy. Also, this business of bringing up the opinions of Windows XP users is unnecessary. If they are still using Windows XP at this point in time then of course they are not going to upgrade. We upgraded to Windows 8 in our office and everyone loves it. 15 employees who work on and off site. It takes minimal time to learn Metro and even then it's not forced, Some of our employees rarely even bother with it.

RealInIT
RealInIT

This is such a non-starter, my last 3 contracts were with companies who run XP & 7 and are NOT planning to upgrade to 8. They will just wait for a better business solution, not wanting to buy all new applications just to run that comical UI. It doesn't even belong on a smart phone!!! I continue to point out that Linux desktops will talk to Windows Servers, Linux Servers are just more bullet-proof than MS servers. Face it world, how many times do you have to reboot MS servers to add features and updates??? None of the Linux servers/desktops have had to be rebooted just to update software!!

milesbradford
milesbradford

I have a feeling that Microsoft will start sending out bugs to break Windows XP and say that it's broken because it isn't anymore. Of course that won't be until 2014 but, nevertheless this is the kind of company that Microsoft has always been so what's new about MS....Oh -- what's new is that people are actually beginning to catch on to the gimmicks that Microsoft has always used in duping the businesses around the world that if they don't upgrade to a new MS OS -- that for some reason their documents will cease to be documents or that their databases will cease to be databases. A bit of extreme analogy -- but, you get my drift. Or Microsoft has threatened the security of its own security and forced companies to upgrade by saying - well, Microsoft isn't supporting you anymore with you old stuff -- so if you don't upgrade -- well, your destiny is on your own head. Since 1993 there has been basic UNIX and Linux that will do databases, spread sheets and documents and in most cases better security. In todays market -- those almost free products are equal to or exceed Microsofts performance, security and support. There is no longer any reason to be ripped off paying 300% or should I say more like 300x the true value of what is received from Microsoft. People as well as businesses who buy into the Microsoft hype and throw away good money for cheap value products are not all there. In other words -- a bit stupid. Arrogant in being able to make poor decisions about software tools. You know -- the person who has enough education to go apply for a business license to start and build a business -- but, not educated enough to be in the know about the tools available for that business to use in the ways of softwares and software support. Microsoft feeds off these kinds peoples and businesses and doesn't bother looking back.

post2base
post2base

You must be kidding!!! Just how many company and institution go around deploying new OS with a week or two of its official release........ANSWER: VERY LITTLE. Hence your result. You Apple Droids and Googling Androids just can't stop, step back, and listen to yourselves, remember many said the same when windows 7 was released; or the Microsoft Office 2007 menu. Whoever commissioned this survey should open their eyes, moving your infrastructure to another OS requires proper planning, planning you cannot carry out within two weeks of official windows 8 release. In time this view will change. Something, companies simply want to wait until their hardware needs replacing. As long as Microsoft continue to grow organically, and pay attention to what most of their customers, Windows 8 will be even more successful than Windows 7. I have seen so many Bloggers who do not have understanding of the technology they are Blogging about, regarding the new Windows 8 live tiles seen as not suitable for corporate customers; THE GROUP POLICY WILL SORT IT OUT!!! A fine wine is what Windows 8 have become............. So you want to see your old desktop .... it is there for you. Mobile Users now have a choice of Tablet or Laptop.... with access to their resources. Windows 8 also means..... sub-standard APPS will be rejected. So you do not have a touch-screen....you do not need a touch-screen to deploy Windows 8. Live-Tiles can be good for some users..... those who often forget where their icons are on the desktop, or refuse to navigate through the Start-Menu. I have come across many users who want Windows to remain Classic, and do everything for them at work, and then expect very little productivity of their shinny Apple iPad; apart from getting the latest APP. Of Course, Systems Administrators who are themselves afraid of change, cannot lead any change successfully......TRUE

Fravio
Fravio

I've heard the same with windows 7

jr
jr

Microsoft made the mistake of releasing Windows 8 to the desktop before the tablets. They should have released the tablets first. When you work there, you might want the features on the desktop. I've already got the Classic Start back and never look at the tiles. The OS loads and boots fast. Runs great on older lower powered notebooks, even better than Win7. I've not run into any application issues except for IE10 not being recognized by some web sites. Then again, there is Chrome. The security and refresh of the OS without wiping the user settings is a great plus. Microsoft should make an install for Business or person, with business you get the Start menu, nothing hidden, all details, not live tiles to distract. Then the home user can get the ADD related features. They should have done that with Vista on. Really make a Pro or Business version.

my_brother_martin
my_brother_martin

Sure, people still using Windows XP are not in a rush to deploy Windows 8. But what I find interesting is that 1/5th of people not even using Windows are planning to deploy Windows 8. Maybe all of the naysayers are wrong and Microsoft has a better view of future markets than they do.

tamouh2
tamouh2

I've seen Win8, took me an hour just to figure out the most basic tasks. The Metro UI adds no value for the enterprise. People want to be able to multi task more, experience reliable systems with less crashes and compatibilities. Windows 8 like has been said is for the tablet and will remain that way. Bring back the Start Menu with the task bar and I may consider win8 for our clients in 2-3 years time, otherwise, skip it.

oskar401
oskar401

There is still 18 months of XP support from Redmond. Add that to heavy investments in Legacy software and a very uncertain business climate, a new interface and you soon see that most prudent businesses are going to sit on the fence for a while yet.

drvazquez1997
drvazquez1997

Well let's see... a new BMW just came out and we should all go and buy a new one... Of course there is not surprise on this...

snafaxi
snafaxi

Yup! having come from Fortune 500 corporations with huge numbers of employees, and huge IT staffs, I suspect that few will roll out this version of the OS. However, as a very small business owner, who specializes in 21st century marketing for other small businesses, I suspect this OS will be revolutionary, once the leading edge techno thinkers explore the possibilities. The light, fast and integrated small businesses are going to provide massive competition to dinosaur corporations in niche markets within the next three years, and I suspect this OS will help make the differenct. I am personally pushing a 100 so to speak, and having to open my mind enough to study a few tutorials at windows.com keeps my brain in the game so to speak. (Contrary to popular opinion, I found a start button, and I love having my apps immediately on screen). P.S. the search tool seems vastly improved to me)

gates_clone
gates_clone

What percentage of organizations had no plans to deploy Windows Vista when it was released? I think that comparison is more relevant, because it was the transition between Windows XP and Windows 7.

csumbler
csumbler

Still running primarily XP. A couple of the older Boxes that bit the dust (beyond repair) came in with Windows 7. As long as can keep those older machines humming away and serviceable as they are, will be sticking with XP. Can't foresee switching to a touch screen environment and the need for Windows 8

jsm555
jsm555

We're a small business, and Win 8 looks like a real loser, so we have no plans to deploy. However, we replace computers on a fairly regular basis, and will likely have to buy 1-2 laptops next year. Those will inevitably come with Win 8 installed. It's a real hassle trying to administer pc's with two OS's, but if the Win 8 release is like Vista, there'll be no 'option' to get new pc's with Win 7 installed - So the effective cost of a new laptop will increase by $120 or so, the price of a new full installation of Win 7. Am I wrong about that?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

force upgrades down people's throats so MS can make more money

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

on any number of systems. Thus your charge is really NZ$50.00 for 115 seats or less than NZ$0.50 per seat.

brainout
brainout

Firt, you're overestimating the change. It will not be rapid, as touch screen is cumbersome, large monitors are as well, and there are other OS which can handily use the older monitors, like Linux and its many branches. I just bought two monitors to comply with Win8, and the two replaced will be attached to my DOS machines. Or, to my Win98 or other XP machines. I have to keep all those machines, as later changes in the OS or architecture, means that some vital programs on the older machine, can't 'upgrade'. So the machine remains quite useful. So it still needs a monitor, and flat panel monitors are essentially still VGA/SVGA. Only my old 286 with monocrome card, still needs a dedicated cRT, since I won't upgrade the card.

JJFitz
JJFitz

Windows 8 requirements and capabilities.

brainout
brainout

MS' own website on Win8, and the Win 8 Upgrade Advisor program you can install to test your PC for upgradability, all talk about the resolution issue. Its apps and 'snap' (a stupid program for making you able to view only TWO windows, else you're stuck with full-screen) -- these require widescreen resolution. You can get a 16:9 resolution (or better) monitor at Dell Auction or Amazon for less than $70. MS' new disgusting and dysfunctional websites on Windows 8 make it really hard to find the System requirements page, so here it is (remove the spaces): http:// windows.microsoft. com/en-US/windows-8/system-requirements Basically, you can run Desktop on a screen with less than 1366 x 768 resolution. In Modern UI, you seem to be stuck with fullscreen. Yet one more reason to say no to Win8. OH: you don't have to use UEFI, but if Win8 can't turn on the NX parameter, it won't install.

brainout
brainout

I don't know any vendor (and I checked, since I was buying for my business) who will force you to put Win8 on a laptop or desktop. Even Dell Auction is selling Win7 Pro machines for a song, even with (2nd generation) i3-i7.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

and search for customer returns, scratch and dents, warranty repaired, etc. You can also see if a newer model have W7 drivers available, buy that model, and pay for W7 installation media.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

Microsoft has already pressured some vendors to stop shipping new systems with Win 7, so you may have some issues next year.

carlsf
carlsf

The base cost per seat compared to MS. And as you have said its all on one disk. Sorry MS but Im loving Zorin.

JJFitz
JJFitz

Most businesses have a license to install Win 7 already and most businesses deploy machines from images.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Lamer than the waiting room at the wheelchair repair shop. Lamer than that house-saving pig.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Because that was lame...

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

system spat the dummy due to the number having been already activated count as technical support, as, according to past MS announcements, XP is no longer receiving free technical support and no warranty claims are allowed now. As to your questions, the answers are No and No, but I take no bets on them keeping the activation process for XP active. Past activation systems didn't require on-line activation, in fact the early copies of XP didn't either.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Or for as long as MS is. Otherwise they encourage business piracy. Does MS have the legal right to revoke a paid for license? If they do, do they have to pay the damages it causes?

JJFitz
JJFitz

I will admit that transferring and OEM license takes some work but it is not impossible. Google "Transfer a Microsoft OEM license" and you will find information. That's why I recommend buying a retail license anyway -for home and especially for small businesses.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

between machines as out local laws allows for that. But you have to be technically competent enough to do or have a tech who can, and not all can. Then you also have the issue with activation from Microsoft when you do. I don't know when it is, but you can bet your bottom dollar there is a date when they will simply turn the Win 7 activation process off and say 'stiff you can't activate it now.'

JJFitz
JJFitz

but I can say that Windows imaging tools are free and Windows 7 is available for purchase now. If you have a license on an old machine you can put it on a new one if you retire the old one. There are many solutions to remaining on Windows 7.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

is the service available everywhere in the world

JJFitz
JJFitz

There are computer resellers who will retain an image of your standard computer configuration and apply it to all computers you purchase through them. One of the companies I work with offers this service for free when you buy your desktops and laptops (Dells and Lenovos in this case) through them. Because they keep Dells and Lenovos in stock, the cost is the same as buying them directly from the manufacturer. You can purchase them with the current or the previous OS version. You can order servers this way too. - Pre-assembled and pre-configured It would be very cost effective even if you purchased 10 computers per year. How small are we talking? If you are smaller than that, buy a block of 5 Windows 7 licenses now.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

those types of licences and settle for individual licences with the new systems as they buy them. And the person I was responding to sounded like a small business that operates that way.