Software

Review: The new Corel Office

Corel's reboot of their fabled office suite brings a fresh look to WordPerfect and company.

Anyone who used a PC in the 1980s and 90s will probably remember the legendary WordPerfect word-processor application. Whether you used the famous DOS "blue screen" version or the later Windows versions, WordPerfect always had that cheeky-charm that gave you excellent WYSIWYG support and various document features. That being said, once Microsoft took command of the market with their business software, WordPerfect fell by the wayside as Microsoft Office became the de-facto standard.

Corel Office

  • Title: Corel Office
  • Company: Corel
  • Supported OS: Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8
  • Price: $49.99
  • Rating: 3 1/2 out of 5
  • Bottom Line: Corel's reboot of their fabled office suite brings a fresh look to WordPerfect and company. However, unless you are a diehard fan of the brand or work specifically with documents designed with the software, stick with something else.

Corel, the current steward of the WordPerfect brand, has launched a reboot of their office suite, which is now designed to be compatible with the recently-launched Windows 8. The "new" Corel Office is here, and, when compared to their far pricier previous WordPerfect Office X6 product, it's available to consumers at a more reasonable price-point of $49.99. The suite comes with three core applications: Corel Write, Corel Calculate, and Corel Show. As you probably have guessed, these apps represent the Microsoft Office equivalents of Word, Excel and PowerPoint, respectively.

When I started using the office suite, I noticed that the user interface strongly resembles that of Office 2010 and all the functions were very easy to find via the ribbon-style menus. Compared to Corel's previous WordPerfect Office X6 release, I was actually able to find everything quickly and efficiently. I never had any problem performing various actions, like doubling my line spacing or adjusting paragraph alignment. In the older product, features were buried under sub-menus, which could contribute to a higher learning curve at the time. This time it was all smooth sailing.

Compatibility

Now the biggest question on everyone's mind is, "Can I open MS Office documents with little to no document compatibility issues?" Surely, document fidelity is essential in any business setting. For this test, I took Corel Write and opened several documents created via Word with varying degrees of formatting difference and compared results. I threw my Word formatted resume into Corel Write and, unlike LibreOffice, was able to maintain the line spacing and page count to a perfect T.

However, on another document, such as one of my earlier written reviews for TechRepublic, my information box showed up completely blank. Effectively, as much as I would like this to be a perfect world scenario, Corel's conversion engine is no silver bullet.

Clearly, Write (right) does yield some document errors when compared against Word (left).

Bottom line

Corel's new office suite, although vastly improved in the user interface and ease-of-use department when compared to older versions, isn't without its share of issues. At a much saner price of $49.99, this software might be good if you have pre-existing WordPerfect, Quattro and Projector documents to work with. If you are looking for an office suite that will fit well with more basic needs, LibreOffice might be the better bet.

Also read:

About

An avid technology writer and an IT guru, Matthew is here to help bring the best in software, hardware and the web to the collective consciousness of TechRepublic's readership. In addition to writing for TechRepublic, Matthew currently works as a Cus...

45 comments
lars.h.eriksen
lars.h.eriksen

According to Wikipedia, 'It was based on Ability Office 5'. Presumably, it differs from WordPerfect Office not only in user interface and price but also in functionality. Your review would only be interesting if it discussed the depth of the functionality of Corel Office.

sethdg
sethdg

Word has always been crap, but has become the de facto standard everywhere. The ship for WordPerfect sailed when Novell bought the product, pretty much the death knell for any software. Back in the day WP was superior in every way. Unfortunately, Windows versions perpetually suffered from stability problems. And now, with a ribbon UI? Seriously, you have to copy that horrible feature from MS Office? There is not a single new feature that MSO or WP have added in the last 15 years that is of any real use to real world users. LibreOffice (the living fork of OpenOffice, which is pretty dead anymore) has all the features anybody could want from an office suite, *and* it imports and exports all document formats, *and* it's free, *and* it runs on all desktop platforms. WP users are clinging to a fantasy that doesn't exist. WP will never regain traction in the real world. LibreOffice and open document formats are the way forward. Of course, that's my own fantasy. MS will likely continue to dominate the space for the foreseeable future.

Dr. Leonard
Dr. Leonard

I'm a fan of WordPerfect for some of the same reasons mentioned above, especially the Reveal Codes feature; that makes it easy to reformat text using "Find and Replace," for example (such as deleting hard returns or line breaks where you want the text to flow instead). In fact, I am still using WordPerfect 8 for many things, and earlier I used the DOS version and even set up books for publishing with it. I am glad to see WordPerfect making a comeback, though so far WP 8 is still going strong for me. I use it along with Word 2000, but prefer WP. (I am a software antiquarian, still running Windows 2000 on two of our five computers, XP on the others).

Jymbul
Jymbul

A reasonable and quick review, BUT Corel Office is a scaled back version of the full WordPerfect Office suite... somewhat like MS Works is to MS Office. Corel Write is NOT WordPerfect, Corel Calculate is NOT QuattroPro and Corel Show is not Presentations. You are not comparing like with like. Also when will MS Word allow rotated table like you could get in WP5.1 for DOS. I hate having to us Landscape pages to show large/wide table so that when you prin and bind a document you end up with Lefters and righters instead of headers and footers!!!? Tah James

semi-adult
semi-adult

First, I began with WordPerfect in the 80s (!), in DOS, at version 4.0, a product of Satellite Software, when I reviewed it as a technical editor of a national (at the time) magazine. I didn't like it, because it seemed incomplete -- it didn't use the full keyboard very well, and it seemed caught between the old WordStar control-key feature option and something that worked fairly well. When version 4.1 came out, fully updated, I switched to WP, stayed with it through every upgrade and the move to Windows, and still have it available for my personal work on every computer I use. I became a "WordPerfect Certified Resource" along the way, and made a few bucks supporting users who wanted to do sophisticated and complicated things with it (although I was never paid by WordPerfect). I mention all of this just so nobody accuses me of being a shill. WordPerfect began as a product on minicomputers in the very late 70s, before "personal computers" were a viable option. It did not have many user-friendly features at that inauspicious start, but it was designed even then in a coherent way, prepared for growth. As desktop hardware came along, it was ported and soon enough left the original platform behind. At version 4.1, where I liked it well enough to use it, WP took FULL advantage of the keyboard and function keys -- when nobody else really had bothered with that -- and was the killer app of it's time on that alone. Reveal Codes was there too, even then. And Word was only a gleam in some geek's eye, before Microsoft bought up enough tech operations to gain the skill to make any useful word processor at all. What should be mentioned is that WordPerfect routinely introduced the features that users used, and liked, and Word eventually coopted just about every one. Except Reveal Codes, which is only in the past decade been rather clumsily, and incompletely, cloned. Apparently it just isn't that easy to tear out the insanity of hidden tricks in favor of transparency, even for Redmond. WordPerfect introduced a workable "office" package in the very early 90s, first on the market that actually worked, although by that time Novell moved in and the ubergeeks managed to mangle the thing. The path of WP through Novell, where it nearly died, to Corel, where it was essentially used as a come-on for other products, or a near-freebie in the wave of crapware placed on new boxes, and eventually replaced with a Word Clone -- the entire elegant original interface has been scrapped to make it run like Word, down to just about every feature -- is a sad thing to have watched. That same miserable process has afflicted the rest of related packages in the "office" set, to the point that they offer no real competition in terms of functionality to the Borg. I use Word these days for almost everything, and Excel, and Access. I live in the real world, not some delusion of the past. I get things done reasonably well with them. But I do miss the drive and sparkle and leadership of WordPerfect, in this cookie cutter world. And every now and again, when I start a new document or a new project, I fire up the old girl for one more whirl, and she still dances like a pro. There's no real point in comparing WP, or the other apps, to anything, not any more. It sounds nice, but they look almost the same, work almost exactly the same, and offer little in the way of differentiation to make a choice meaningful. Sad.

larkahn
larkahn

I may be mistaken, but I believe that Corel Office has been around for awhile -- am not sure about the ribbon, but possibly that too. The Writer, I thought, was built on a different engine -- software created by a different company, and it was not intended as a replacement for the flagship WordPerfect Suite. Mathew, while writing your article, did you have any contact with Corel about the technical aspects of the software, which would either confirm or invalidate my impressions. I feel that your article is very misleading -- this is not a remake of mainstream WordPerfect, just a watered down offshoot.

khunter
khunter

Has anyone seen a comparison between the two? I'd much rather use WP and Word any day. As mentioned by others, the reveal codes feature is the kicker for me. Unfortunately, I have been able to use WP in awhile, but the older version I had allowed me to do complete editing in reveal codes. At $50 the price is right. However, does it work with XP? I'll be moving to Win8 after I buy a new PC (which is after I become employed again).

jdaughtry
jdaughtry

- Open/Libre Office breaks documents. I will never use it again. - I have been using SoftMaker Office for years, with nearly zero compatibility problems with MS Office. The current revision is $80 for three computers, legal for business use. Available for WIndows and LInux, and runs "portable". www.softmaker.com. - SoftMaker offers a previous revision FREE at www.FreeOffice.com, full permanent license. It has been called the "best free alternative to Microsoft".

PeterM42
PeterM42

....than the first version of WordPerfect for Windows. I was working at a company who were rolling out the first version. It was little better than a ropey prototype. We ended up calling it WordDEFECT.

jimcarter1959
jimcarter1959

As a computer technician, I can't tell you how irritated I become listening to customers whine about Microsoft Office tanking for no apparent reason. Unfortunately; a simple uninstall and reinstall OFTEN doesn't solve issues with Microsoft applications. If you enjoy continuous issues and the threat of "macro viruses", then MS Office is the way to go. If you want a more problem free solution, then Corel is less of a headache and more economical. Also; when trading documents via email, if the receiver is not editing what you send then you should be sending PDFs and NOT files specific to ANY application. That's the other most irritating call we get from customers. "I can't open this file" is the cry we hear day in and day out. Often times, these complaints are Word users receiving files from OTHER WORD USERS. Folks don't understand that .docx files can't be natively opened in older versions of Word.

PCcritic
PCcritic

For the past 20 years or so WP has maintained file compatibility with WP6. Users who adopt a newer WP release do not lose access to their previous files, (which I believe would be true of MS Office users as well), and users who do not adopt a newer WP release don't lose the ability to open files written with newer versions of the software. WP also maintains familiar features; users would need to learn any new features that are introduced in new releases, but they don't need to learn a whole new word processor just because of a version upgrade. That is in sharp contrast to the MS Office Suite.

charlie204
charlie204

Currently, I have the Corel WordPerfect Suite X3 on my machine. I just upgraded from Vista to Windows 7, and the compatibility wizard had said it did not know whether or not this would work with Windows 7. Well it does work. The only reason why I would want to upgrade to the new Corel Suite is for integration with Windows 7 and 8. I want to be able to run two programs: WordPerfect, and Quattro Pro. If the new Corel Suite is running after Microsoft Office but leaving WordPerfect folks behind, it is just ridiculous! I have been with Quattro Pro since version 1.0, and with Word Perfect since 4.2 (but version 7.0 was really good.)

DAS01
DAS01

To add to bigsteve666's comments, WP is vastly superior to Word not only because of Reveal Codes (an excellent feature), but some others as well. My experience is based on WP 2000 (!) and Word 2000 and 2010... WP does not try to nanny you in a number of formatting/layout features like headers and footers, and list numbers and bullet points. A number of things are just easier to do in WP... Of course Word does not try to be compatible with anything. Why bother, when it dominates the word-processor market? Somehow I am reminded of Betamax v VHS in videotapes... The good thing about Word and, indeed, the other MS products is, that they have created what is, in effect, a world standard, so that I can be pretty sure any of my correspondents anywhere in the world can open my documents and (at least to a large extent) see what I see. Just a pity that it isn't WP for word-processing...

bigsteve666
bigsteve666

Hi, I'm one of the few who still uses the full Word Perfect Office suite. I do so because of its vastly superior word processing program. It has one feature that makes it so much better than Word -- reveal codes. I personally hate ribbons with buttons, I set up my own toolbars with buttons for the 15-20 most important functions and the rest are easy to find, by and large, in the sub-menus. Back in the day when the USgov was suing Microsoft to break it up, the gov used Word and the attorneys defending Microsoft used Word Perfect. steve

Madsmaddad
Madsmaddad

You comment on the ability of Corel WordPerfect to read Microsoft documents, but conversely, how does Word read documents created in WordPerfect? And does it read odf documents created by Libreoffice? And what about comparisons of the Excel equivalents cross operation? And the presentation stuff? Lets have a decent review if we are going to have one. Peter M

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

What do you think of the new Corel Office? Is your organization looking to move away from Microsoft Office?

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

I should have been clearer to note that Corel Office is actually supposed to be a direct "value-level" competitor to MS Office products and not a proper continuation of the WordPerfect Office series. Why Corel decided to go this route is unknown, though I would suspect that usage of actual WP doc formats (wpd, et al) is considered a "legacy" feature and it can only be had by sticking with the previous WP Office X6 release. The downside to this is the lack of an updated UI, but for some this is not a concern.

DAS01
DAS01

Sethdg, I think the outlook for WP deteriorated earlier, namely on the introduction of Windows GUI (i.e. 3.0/3.1). WP was late into making a right version, caused at least partly, as I understand it, by MS not giving Win code out early enough, and then MS pursuing extremely active marketing. I agree that WP making a comeback are extremely low indeed for the reasons you have given, i.e. Word being the de facto standard and Open/Libre Office being a viable alternative. I wonder how big some other office suites I have seen mentioned here are. Plus there is Google Docs. If you make that your master and just need a desktop suite to hold downloaded document copies then odt is sufficient. (But I have not tested the conversion capabilities as I do not have odt -- highly-formatted Word docs translate quite poorly into Google Docs but the other way round is not so bad, and should be getting better).

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

You are correct that those products are not the same. In my review text, I wasn't clear to point out that when I meant compatibility with WP Office, I meant the ability to open files saved as MS Office filetypes.

lars.h.eriksen
lars.h.eriksen

I am a long-time and relatively proficient MS Word 2010 user who used to use WP 5.1 for DOS way back. While word processing under Windows is a lot easier than under DOS, and Word works great and is easy to use for simple documents, I find that large, complex documents with illustrations and complex paragraph numbering makes Word unstable, difficult to figure out and short of certain functionality. This has made me look for alternatives for my own start-up business. It would have helped if Word had good context sensitive help. For example, if you're in a dialogue box and click on the question mark button or hit F1, you get a general help page for Word. And when you try to search for your problem, you get lots of different Internet hits with varying quality and overlapping content. This really hurts productivity. One specific functionality that still is missing in Word 2010 even though WP 5.1 had it, is the ability to properly locate illustrations vertically tied to a paragraph. In Word, if editing earlier in the document places the paragraph close to the bottom of the page, the illustration goes below the bottom margin or even off the paper. I have tested SoftMaker SoftWriter 2012, and it has the same problem. I have also tested OpenOffice Writer 3.4.1, and that program does it right (moves the illustration to the next page if it doesn't fit above the bottom margin) if you tick 'Follow text flow' in the dialogue box. I have not (yet) tested the rather pricey WordPerfect X6, but I expect that this still works right in WP like it did in WP 5.1. By the way, SoftMaker Office has great help which is context-sensitive and also easy to navigate by topic. OpenOffice has acceptable help which is context-sensitive but a little clumsy to navigate by topic. Oh, and SoftMaker spreadsheet program falls short of MS Excel, which is great. I haven't tested OpenOffice spreadsheet program much yet. I may continue using the rest of MS Office but use something else than MS Word for word processing.

DAS01
DAS01

Am sorry to hear this about the current versions of WP. I am using WP 2000 on Win XP and thought to buy a new version if/when moving to Win 7 or higher. Actually I quite like the Word ribbon (I have MS Office 2010) and do not understand the vehement criticism of which I have seen a lot. Maybe it's old geeks who learned the old menus off by heart... Anyway, if the underlying functionality of WP is still there (including the far superior file manager) then I would be happy to buy a new WP version.

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

If I didn't make this initially clear, I do apologize. But yes, Corel Office is not the same as WP Office X6, particularly from a UI standpoint. Also, actual WP filetypes are not supported, but any documents written in WP Office X6 that were saved as MS Office files will indeed work in Corel Office.

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

I also reviewed Kingsoft Office awhile back and found that to be surprisingly good with MS Office document compatibility.

DAS01
DAS01

I used WP for DOS and then WP 2000, which I still use. NO defects (except one bug I found in WP for DOS, when trying to insert rows at the bottom of a table).

DAS01
DAS01

Does not installing the MS Compatibility Pack help?

DAS01
DAS01

I think part of Word's problem was the need to find a more compact file format. Word .doc files are quite bloated, whereas .docx are much smaller. I am not sure the effect is as pronounced in other apps, and I have not checked. Speaking personally, I did/do not mind so much the need to migrate to Excel (from Lotus 1-2-3, which I still use with some fairly sophisticated spreadsheets because conversion is very difficult or beyond my ability) or PowerPoint. For me the big issue is the word processor. Besides WP I use Word because I have to, including the fact that Google Docs does not offer WP compatibility.

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

I did really like WP 7.x too myself. I believe that was made back during the Novell era. Incidentally, I should clarify the last paragraph of my review, when I make mention of documents created under the older WordPerfect Office X6. I didn't mean actual .wpd and .qpw filetypes, which is what most readers were hoping for, but rather their MS Office format-saved equivalents. I believe I might have caused some confusion there. If you need to work with .wpd and .gpw files, you are going to need to shoot for the WordPerfect Office X6 edition. Thanks for pointing that out. Incidentally, if you know where to look, Corel sells OEM versions of WordPerfect Office X6 that are significantly cheaper than their retail counterparts.

Madsmaddad
Madsmaddad

---I can be pretty sure any of my correspondents anywhere in the world can open my documents --- This computer (my wife's) is still on Word 2000 as my wife likes it, knows it, and cannot see any reason to change. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. I have added the utility to read docx format, but I know it mucks up fancy formatting. I created a spreadsheet to track and convert litres and miles traveled to miles per gallon in Openoffice, but had to change it to work in M$ Excel. The modified version works Ok back in OO. ( I still think in gallons). Cheers all.

OurITLady
OurITLady

"WP is vastly superior to Word not only because of Reveal Codes (an excellent feature), but some others as well" - MSWord also has a reveal codes feature which I use regularly (in 2003 and 2007 - haven't tried 2010 yet), any chance you could clarify why the feature is that much superior in WP?

Matt Nawrocki
Matt Nawrocki

Hi Peter: The goal of my review was to view Corel Office from a MS Office point of view. Most businesses rely on excellent compatibility with Word docs in particular, and that is why I focused mostly on Writer. The other applications in the Corel suite work as expected. However, since I am not acutely familiar with the intricacies of Excel and PowerPoint in terms of how compatible documents from those programs are with Corel, I stuck with what I knew best in terms of a comparison. If the DOC and DOCX conversion engine in Writer is not all that its cracked up to be, I expect no less from the other applications. Given the limited scope of what I was looking at, I felt the strong look at the word processor was the best bet. Incidentally, your criticism is perfectly valid and I should have pointed out the fact that my review was meant to have a more limited focus. I will do better to ensure that my audience understands my intentions more fully next time.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Office from Microsoft has a very poor ability to open any other suites Data, even when it does on the very rare occasions it displays them all wrong and at best it makes them readable sometimes. Word Perfect Documents in their native Format generally speaking do not open in Word though if you save them as a PDF from X4 Word Perfect [i]I think[/i] on they should be readable in anything. However having said that I personally would never trust Word to read or render any other Output and that includes output from different Versions of Word reliably or correctly. ;) Col

DAS01
DAS01

I suspect most people do not go beyond relatively simple documents... but Reveal Codes WP approach to headers and footers etc is still extremely useful. Yes, unfortunately current WP is surprisingly expensive.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Only if there is 1 version difference between the different Office Suites. Allow more to creep in with Domestic Users or worse still some Business Users who are mandated what Format that they need to submit Documents in and they need to have their documents read by the receiver and it's firstly not possible to insist that the receiver installs anything on their systems and even if you force them to it doesn't render the document readable always. For instance here a Government Department requires that Tenders be submitted electronically in .DOC Format the first company who had moved to Office 2007 sent in a Tender for a smallish job of about 24 Million and where promptly told that their Tender didn't open. They resubmitted the Tender again which again didn't open and the person who received the unopenable file dumped it as the company placing the tender obviously wasn't interested enough to submit a readable Tender. Back then they where told to submit all Tenders as Word Documents not .DOC instead of .DOCX, the result not considered for that job and a listing against the company that they appeared not to care and to move them to the Bottom of the List out of the Acceptable Tenderes. Doesn't matter what you have you need to work with the people who you communicate with and submit Electronic Documents in a format that is readable to them and it's insanity to believe that you can tell anyone what they need on their system to read your Documents. Microsoft ignored this and it was their Customers who suffered. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Make It Fit in 2003? No you haven't because it doesn't exist that only came latter after M$ copied it from Word Perfect. The strange thing here is that I to consider WP far superior to Office and I was derided by staff when I first started this business because I used WP. They all suggested I get with the program and switch to Word to which I just replied I'm more comfortable with WP and you can use what you like except for the places where we are legally required to use WP instead of Word. Now more than a few years after I started this business they all use WP and moan like hell when they are forced to use Word for anything. While I can not point to any specific Feature it's all of them that are in WP that are not in Office and the ease of use with everything in WP over Word. The Revel Codes is just a small example of where WP far exceeds Word capabilities. The Make It Fit was 4 Mouse Clicks to make a document fit to a Page Count which was latter adopted by the Office Team at Microsoft and because I use it a lot it's one of the things I'm much more familiar with. But to be perfectly honest it's always just plain and simple [b]Painful[/b] when I have to use Office for anything. The little problems with Formatting in one version of Office not being correctly recognized in another and the need to change the Default Output from DocX in the latter versions is a major Stumbling Block to it's wide spread adoption in places that have to submit documents in DOC format occasionally. If you use Office all day every day it may not be an issue but for my customers/clients who are not Power Users and do other things that may not even involve a computer for their daily work it's something that they have to either remember or not move onto newer Office Suites so that they can get their work done in a fashion that is acceptable to that business. When Microsoft finally prevents Office 2003 from working on their newer OS's that's going to eventually lead to those customers who are required to use it to move away from all Microsoft Products. Not going to happen tomorrow but if things stay the same it will eventually happen. Col

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

shows [u]all[/u] codes in the document: bold, underscore, hard breaks, hard spaces, table codes, everything. Then you can go through the codes you see and delete those you no longer need. I (and most other Word Perfect users, too) have fixed formatting issues more than once by doing this. Caveat: My experience with WP ended in 2005, but I can't imagine the WP developers removing or modifying such a useful and popular feature, particularly since that feature is the primary difference between Word Perfect and MSWord

DAS01
DAS01

What Word has is nothing like WP Reveal Codes, where all formatting codes become visible. This is extremely handy for finding and dealing with formatting problems. In WP there is much more control over layouts etc, such as paragraph numbering and bullet points. Then there are the simple things like being able to justify different chunks of a row in the same row. For example, in a header you might like to have the heading left-justified and the page number right-justified. I have not worked out a way to do it in Word, so my workaround is to left-justify and insert tabs. Not as elegant. If you have never used WP you are not missing anything... Luckily my need to use advanced formatting features has dropped, so Word is not such a hassle, I have even started originating documents in Google Docs, and its word-processor is still pretty basic cf Word and WP.

Darryl~
Darryl~

You summed it up almost exactly what my experience has been over the years.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Unfortunately for some people who are not overly computer literate remembering to change the Default Format that you save in is a different story. Add to that they M$ change that Default Format with every Patch so if today you change 2007 [i]I'm not sure about 2010 as I've never been required to change it but I can see no reason to believe it would be different to 2007[/i] So if in 2007 you change Word to save as a .DOC File Format it works that way till the next Patch is released and then it changes back to .DOCX, not a problem if you are using GP then you can lock it in that position but some clients don't have a Network let alone a server and they do Government Tenders. The little ones up to 50Million $ Jobs and are not using computers all day every day let alone one program often enough to really get to know it. They are flat out remembering how to use the finer points of Quicken or MYOB Products which are used to pay their staff and they use those packages a lot more than Word. I do however agree that M$ had to change the Word Format because it was nasty to work with and downright unstable so .DOCX is an improvement and shows just how badly Microsoft implemented Word to begin with. It was never in the same class as Word Perfect and only became the Default App because it was bundled in an Office Application where you could transfer Data between different Applications. That was a Brilliant Move on M$ Part as it saved multiple Data Entry Jobs in WP, Lotus and so on and is what made Larger Offices far more productive. But the entire basis of what Microsoft Office was built on is the real problem and things are going to need to change again in the not to distant future when they outgrow .DOCX ;) However on the other hand Word Perfect has not needed to change their Basic Document Format over it's entire production Life from the DOS Days to the current. It speaks volumes about a well designed product as apposed to a product that is Good Enough for now. Col

DAS01
DAS01

Hal9000, the stories do not make fun reading, but sometimes there has to be a technology shift and you cannot always be backwards compatible. Maybe MS could have done it differently, maybe not; I am not a programmer, but something had to be done about the old file formats. I have Office 2010 and I can save documents in the pre-2007 formats .doc, .xls etc. For one correspondent I convert my .docx to .doc on the rare occasion I send him a document.

DAS01
DAS01

If people move away from Word, or Office in general, I suspect it will be towards free suites like OpenOffice or Libre Office. Unfortunately Google Docs only supports .odt of the non-MS suites.

DAS01
DAS01

As I mentioned elsewhere, there are other important differences. In a number of areas the approach (like Excel v Lotus-1-2-3) is different. In spreadsheets I don't think it matters as much, but in word-processing it does, to me anyway.

Realvdude
Realvdude

Having been working with Word since Office 97, I was not fond of the "Ribbon", though I have been somewhat successful at retraining my "recall" of the Ribbon layout. I figured out how to set your header requirement in under a minute; Insert Ribbon, Header - Blank 3 column, set right column text by selecting the 3 vertical dot icon then from the Page Number dropdown choose Current Position. You can also use the Insert Alignment Tab option while editing the header.

DAS01
DAS01

PS. One can delete formatting codes directly, for example.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

That's a great point. The capability is there in Excel, why not in Word?