Windows 8

Stop freaking out about the Windows 8 interface

Based on what has often been very intense and passionate feedback, Microsoft has made a few changes to the Windows 8 Metro Interface.

First, let me reiterate the sentiment of the title: Stop freaking out about the Windows 8 Interface. Windows 8 is not even in beta yet, so fretting over how the interface will eventually look is just not healthy. Take a deep breath, count to ten, calm yourself, and then consider the most recent news about the Windows 8 interface.

In a recent Building Windows 8 Blog (you should follow this blog if you really want to get a handle on what Microsoft is doing with Windows 8), Steven Sinofsky explains how his development team has heard your, sometimes impassioned, complaints about the demise of the Start Menu and the rise of the Start screen. He also explains some of the changes made to the Metro Interface to address your concerns.

If you take a look at the new Windows 8 apps screen, shown in Figure A, you can see that the most current interface will allow you to cluster apps together into categories rather than just alphabetical order as was originally shown in the Developers Build. You can also see that the application icons display in a tighter formation to maximize the use of screen real estate.

Figure A

This is the latest look at the Windows 8 app screen.

I suggest you read the Building Windows 8 Blog post very carefully and in its entirety to understand what the Microsoft development team is thinking and how they are approaching the building of the interface. At this point, there is a significant amount of flexibility in the overall approach, and they are listening to your concerns, so be as descriptive as you can when presenting your ideas.

And for the numerous members who have complained that Microsoft never listens, it appears they actually are listening, just make sure what they hear is worth listening to and provides some direction for them to follow. It is your time to be heard, so make the best of it.

Also read:

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

134 comments
dl_wraith
dl_wraith

If you want to see what Metro may evolve into, have a look at the new dashboard on the Xbox 360. It has a very WP7/W8 Metro feel about it, particularly since it's all designed around social functions and the Kinect controller (AKA fluffy touchscreen-esqu interface for your telly)

wolfeman77346
wolfeman77346

I work in a MS based NOC center. I work with multiple computers, running multiple monitors (3+ ea.), running ten's of professional applications, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Exactly how is this new app OS supposed to allow me to perform my job duties in an efficient manner? How is it designed to improve MY productivity? One app per monitor? Give me a break! If I wanted a cell phone OS, I'd go down to my local phone outlet and buy one there.

lansbone
lansbone

Maybe the people at Leapfrog would like the metro interface for their machines.

froelicc
froelicc

This is a clear case of a company not understanding it's customers. The tablet interface is fine (ON A TABLET PC!!!), but not on a laptop or desktop! here is a reminder of a not so original thought. Have two versions of windows 8. One for tablets, and one for PCs... Of cours feel free to go the other route and drive all your customers to buy a Mac!

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

Ok, ok. I'm getting a lot of statements basically adding up to the opinion that 'stop freaking out about x feature in a pre-beta' and 'MS are listening, this is the time to be heard' are contradictory. Please calm yourselves - they aren't. Freaking out is not constructive and just paints us as reactionary zealots that might be closed to change. It devalues your genuine opinions and feedback and in turn affects the weight MS will give the rest of us. So, if you are sort of freaking out because you hate the approach, your opinion is valid and needs to be heard - just provide your negative feedback in a constructive way to MS so they can look at doing something about it before launch. Going: "I hate W8 and am not upgrading. No start menu? WHAT ARE THEY THINKING!!!" or something similar gets you no notice from MS. Saying to them "I like the start menu. It's easy to use and all windows users have grown up with this. It's accepted MS UI practise. Moving away from it could confuse existing users and alienate existing fanbase. Big tiles in an apps folder doesn't adequately replace it and feels a bit clunky on a desktop machine. Can we have options to turn the start menu or something similar back on?" could be a better way to get your point across. Yeah, a bit obvious and preachy, I know (and apologise) but come on, intelligent tech heads should be able to discuss opinions without foaming at the mouth and 'freaking out'

jlholmes21
jlholmes21

Microsoft are targeting as many platforms as they can with one operating system. For example Ubuntu switched from Gnome 2 to Unity to target tables as well. Unity is far better and has features similar to this. It would be nice if the colours were neutral though... not a green background

Ron_007
Ron_007

I just read this article: http://www.infopackets.com/news/business/microsoft/2011/20111028_rumor_windows_8_due_august_2012_win9_in_2014.htm It suggest MS is aiming for release in August next year. Granted, it is a rumour, but if it is anywhere near correct, RIGHT NOW is the time to be vocal about major changes like the desktop UI. I wouldn't be surprised it that is their current plan. They need to get it out to generate revenue since Win7 isn't selling, or XP is dying, as fast as they would like. If they plan to release this summer, their is very little time for major changes to the basic desktop UI. It will take a great deal of vocal input from the public to convince them to make that kind of fundamental change. Monkeys of the world unite! Rock the World! Start jumping up and down in unison to get MS's attention! Metro SUCKS Bananas! It doesn't work on the desktop, don't force it on us.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

who say the Start menu is still available and "just a click away", it is. But, it is relegated to dhimmi status. Metro is still the primary interface and you can find yourself back there without even trying unless you edit the Registry. Then you lose the enhanced Task Manager, etc. When I installed 8, my initial reaction was akin to "what kind of crap is this?" After using it for about a month, my reaction is "what kind of crap is this?" Give me a real, non-kindergarten interface. I'm used to the current one, but I'm open to improvements that are not Metro.

sonnystarks
sonnystarks

Taking a long overdue stand! Any company that thinks I am too dumb to read a menu and insists I wade through stupid little ribbon icons, must also understand I am probably too dumb to read my credit card number. No menu choice? No purchase. This includes Windows 8, The next version of Microsoft Office and any cloud app that does not give intelligent people the choice of using a menu option.

Lightning Joe
Lightning Joe

"It is your time to be heard, so make the best of it." "Stop freaking out about the Windows 8 interface." Sorry to say, but these two statements contradict each other. If now IS the "time to be heard," then now IS the time to "freak out" about the interface, isn't it? How is this not plain on its face? As to Microsoft's history of ignoring user input; it's a long one. That they are now making noises about paying attention means EITHER: they are paying attention, OR: they are making noises. Since the product can't be changed much once it is shipped, I think that now IS the time to "freak out," if there is something that sits wrong. As does this WHOLE "Apps" thing -- a desktop or netbook is NOT a phone, and making it look and act like one just requires yet another learning curve, ala the whole "ribbon" thing that now, five years later, SOME commentators are finding "an improvement" while the rest of us continue to suffer it. The bare fact that Microsoft introduced their new L&F as looking JUST like a phone interface should have shown everyone just how badly their heads were screwed on. Maybe the Win 8 release WILL have some desirable features, but from here, I have NO confidence whatsoever in that.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

Are the "Squares" customizable? Will said customization cause problems? That pic above looks really busy. I don't need nor want 30+ icons or tiles cluttering my screen. Windows Explorer? I assume it is still there. I use it a lot to find my junk. Usually start apps by double clicking on the specific file.

jmoore
jmoore

@MS ...I don't want a touch screen operating system. They are great for hand held devices but for a desktop machine or a workstation, the last thing I want is to have to clean my display every other hour because of greesey finger prints. Most importantly after using your operating systems since Win3.1 I am very profecient with hot keys. It makes a huge difference to not have to take the time to go for a secondary input device (mouse) let alone a tertiary device.

eboyhan
eboyhan

I have to laugh at all the rants about the start screen, and the deprecation of the start menu in W8 -- the passion is about the same as the "real names" controversy over at Google+. I mostly use W7 on all my machines -- almost everything I use is in some way pinned to the task bar. I have about 40 icons on my desktop which I never use (I have to guess that their presence is due to installers placing them there -- a waste). I have an elaborate and very deeply nested start menu, which I also almost never use. The start screen looks like a good UI for horizontal display devices like tablets where touch works best. Touch will come to vertical displays, but will not be much used because holding the hand up to a vertical screen is fatiguing, which many might say is the death knell for a touch UI on traditional laptop and desktop form factors. Not so fast say I -- I expect we'll see modalitities/utilities that allow your venerable mouse to emulate the touch of your finger on the screen. As to ways of organizing access to apps, files, and data the start screen may be a good way to go -- or not. We just don't have enough long term usage of the Metro UI to determine its usefulness -- that will evolve in the fullness of the time between now and W8 RTM. It's time to stop pontificating about this, put our heads down, and get some "real" metro apps developed; maybe some "UI utilities" as well. Mostly people have to sit down and start to use the new UI and unlearn their current predilection for "what is" in order to see if Metro "could be"

jmoore
jmoore

I don't care what they do as long as it's backwards compatible and I have some control over the interface so I can custom fit it to how I work and for the love of beer, please make it easy to support the pebcak users. It shouldn't be rediculously hard to find administrator functions.

fhrivers
fhrivers

The damn Start Menu didn't go anywhere. I'm mildly acquainted with WDP and even I know that the original Start Menu is just a click or touch away.

AudeKhatru
AudeKhatru

Naysayers need to pay attention. Microsoft has been listening for some time. I was on the Windows Phone Backstage forum, and they were listening to us from the beginning. "Windows Phone 7 Series" We got that shortened to Windows Phone 7. No Cut and Paste....we were told that would be added after WP7 shipped, long before it shipped. They are listening. We need to keep talking, and not just whining.

wompai
wompai

tabbed browsing in the windows explorer, ain't that cool?

cquirke
cquirke

If you don't kick ass now, early in the development, you'll get feature-frozen out. Also, remember; this is the Sinofsky era, where less is known or shown during development, user feedback is likely to be ignored, and shipping on time may override getting it right. On that, it's inappropriate to compare Vista with 7, as most of the big work was already done in Vista. A generic MS problem is "competition envy", where instead of making a better Windows, it's all about chasing after what others are doing and playing the "me too" game. For example, if "the cloud" makes MS nervous, they set out to "embrace the cloud", eroding what is good about NOT blurring the edges between your system and everywhere else. We've seen this with IE4's "everything's a web page", Vista's "search everything", and the nth attempt to restart MSN as Windows Live. When I start an app, I want to know exactly what code I'm launching. That's why we have unique filespecs and file name extensions. I don't want to "search" and get spoofed into vendor-shoved (or malware) look-alike by-catch. What kills the Start Menu is allowing software vendors to design it on a piecemeal basis, then making it harder for users to fix this. Nearly every Start Menu entry starts with the vendor's name (who cares what that is?), then there may be a single pointless flyout from there, then 4 icons of which 1 is destructive (uninstall), 2 are useless fluff ("register" and the same Help I'd get via F1 in the app) and 1 is what I would typically want to do. This gets worse when uninstallers can't track relocated or renamed shortcuts to remoive them, updates keep asserting unwanted icons, and even startup items added to do nothing but recreate the vendor's desired hooray-for-us entries (PowerDVD, we hate you). Some vendors even drop a Desktop.ini to assert corporate Tourettes of (C) this, (R) that and TM the next thing (Intel, take a bow and die). Sometimes I think folks flee to Apple just to avoid pushy self-serving vendors. You've just bought a laptop; do you really need wallpaper and screen saver to scream the brand in your face all day long? And do you really think Metro is going to fix this, where vendors can squirt junk directly to the desktop via the 'net?

portable
portable

Think about it. One person changing isn't a big deal. Now let's take a small business, running on a shoestring, that has 15 people running MS. That is 15 people who will have to be re-trained (you KNOW Office will change too). They will have to have re-training because ALL their habits will no longer work. This is good for MS, you buy Win 8, then have to buy "Office 8" to go with it, and lots of training from MS authorized suppliers. Meanwhile the poor small business is out thousands of dollars for re-training, and lost productivity. Ah, MS doesn't care... they make the money. I have been loyal to MS since my first DOS machine in the early 80s, but each new release of Windows now requires re-training, and MORE new software to be compatible. IF Win 8 is as bad as it looks this may be what I need to go to Linux. On the other hand, I have NEVER seen an even numbered release that was any good, so maybe "Win 9" will fix things.

cesarcalifornia
cesarcalifornia

Microsoft could actually provide both: the Start Menu and the taskbar and then the new features. That way the user would choose how he wants to work. I am glad I have a computer with touch capabilities, but the others do not have touch. I can still use the mouse for the other computers and use either the stuff on the middle of the screen or the older stuff that uses the Start Menu button and the Start Menu items. The user will choose what to use.

mswift
mswift

Here is my basis for comparison. I've run Windows 7 full time since the very first release I could get. I ran Windows 8 for half a day to make sure that our proprietary apps would run and then took it off the machines I set up to do that test. The OS needs to realize that it is not running on anything touch enabled and not show METRO. We like METRO on the phone and have 3 apps in early development for the phone/tablet interface. We are also about to release the latest version of our main product on SQL 2008R2. Customers prefer that application on 1920x1080 screens and call about performance if their network can't keep up to gigabit speeds. Roughly half of those users have 3 screens. One is for our app, one for the internet, and one for everything else. That same set of apps runs all day everyday. Plus, about half the users of this app work on a single screen in a dirty environment so cheaply replaced mice and keyboards win over expensive touch screens.

wmroc
wmroc

All this empty headed blather about Win8 and a great pioneer of programming died last week. A far greater pioneer than Steve Jobs, Bill Gates etc.. I guess who whoever has the most money gets the recognition.

Den2010
Den2010

There have been a few posts requesting that an interface choice be made when installing Windows 8, and that choice gets locked in going forward. In my view, this limits the possibility of discovering which interface really works best for a particular user. My preference is for the standard Windows desktop, but that's my personal choice; another user may favor the more spartan Metro interface. Until you've tried them both, you don't really know which one you're going to dislike more. At that point, you're better equipped to make a choice. The one thing that needs to be present for this scheme to work, however, is the ability to have the full power of PC Windows in both environments. We can't have something like we currently see in the Developer Preview with the Control Panel. When you open the Control Panel now, you're in the Metro UI. At the bottom of the left-hand pane, there's wording to the effect that for more control, go to the Desktop Control Panel. That choice shouldn't have to be made; the full range of Control Panel functions should be available in both user interfaces. This whole exercise may be trivial anyway. The Metro UI seems to me to be a lot of real estate with a limited information density. Is it going to be true of Metro UI on Windows 8 going forward that it's going to be a dumbed-down interface, hiding all but the most immediate information from the user? If that's the case, then my vote changes - nuke that sucker, and make a Windows version that doesn't even go there. With all the fire and heat that Microsoft's getting on the Developer Preview, I do really anticipate the first beta. It may help cement my decision on whether to even consider upgrading to Windows 8, both at work and at home.

passionbiotech
passionbiotech

As a professional software developer I know that EARLY, aka NOW, is the ONLY time to maximize our "Freak"! Every study on software development and "bug fixing" makes it clear that the later in the development process a change the more expensive it becomes. And the relationship is not linear. The EARLIER in the design and build process that a significant change is requested, the EASIER and CHEAPER to do, and the more likely that it will happen. NOW is absolutely the best time to freak www.passionbiotech.com

corcorac
corcorac

There are a llot of valid comments made here but my question is as a Network Administrator will I have to replace the dual monitors all my users have to let them take advantage of the Metro interface? I have tried it both on touchscreen and normal, found disabling metro was the only way to go with standard monitors. Hate to think of the cost of replacing 10,000 monitors before their time!

rpollard
rpollard

This is the absolute funniest article and even funnier are the cave people that hates change. What the crap is wrong with you people. For starters, the Start menu is the stupidest interface idea I've ever seen. Even one of the MS exec's mothers asked him why you have to go to the Start menu to shutdown. Think outside the box. MS needs your help. They have no idea what makes a good interface and all you guys are doing is holding back progress. If you can learn to adapt to the Windows interface you can adapt to just about anything. It almost makes me believe that evolution is a possibility. :-) Crawl out of your caves and open your eyes. The world is changing. MS needs to change with it. Although they are way late in the game they are trying their best to catch up. Try helping instead of hindering progress. Do you really want them to be so far behind that they'll never catch up? From someone who knew interfaces "Think Different."

Gilbertr14
Gilbertr14

A simple regedit at he moment gets you the old start menu favourite. I am pretty sure it will be around in 8. Running it like this at the moment

David A. Pimentel
David A. Pimentel

According to the author we are to "[p]ay no attention to that man behind the curtain." {Wizard of Oz (1939)}. Unfortunately, those that are willing to sit back and await what is coming will eventually get little-to-nothing they desire. Keep up the dialog -- or in this case, "freak out!"

ess
ess

I like to see, a cluster "F" of icons. As long as I don't make them OR have anything to do with them. But it does look like my 86 year old fathers Desktop. My father calls me one day and says his computer is taking 5 minutes to boot up. Come on pop, even the slowest computer in the world doesn't take that long to boot. At first I thought it was just a ploy to get me to come over. So I went over there and wouldn't you know, 6 min 38 sec. to boot....wow !!! After some time had past checking things out, I said, boy there are a lot of icons on the desktop, full screen in fact on a 17" LCD. Ah 40-50 icons (guesstimate of how many on a 17") won't cause a 6 min boot I said to myself, but....I did decide to get the final count anyway, which was 1873. Yea that's about what it would take for a 6 min +++ boot. BTW...They were mostly those link things to pages you find browsing the internet type icons. What do they call them, favorites or something, how they got there....lord knows. So of course being the good IT son I am, I moved the icons off the desktop and wouldn't you know, less then 1 min boot is back. OK pop it's all fixed... What was wrong with it??? You had to many icons on the desktop so I moved them to a better place. Oh....OK....good, thanks for fixing it. No I'm not stupid, I did show him where I put all his icons to all the pages he visited in his life. Besides he had a backup plan, every page he visited, that he liked, was printed out on the reams of paper stacks on the floor. Some even made it into the 6 filing cabinets for safe keeping. However my stupidity came into play when I thought he would remember the next day what I told him. Next day I get a call from the old man. I think one could best describe the call as "Catching Hell" for moving some icons. All 1873 of them.!! Along the lines of " How dare you move them without my permission.!!" Ouch !! When he was on one of his death beds (needless to say I wasn't there), my sister said that he thought, grandma was still alive and I was dead. Well grandma died 14 years ago and I'm writing this little story about how you can "Catch Hell" for being a good IT son. Now I know you won't believe this but, my fathers dead son caught a lot of hell for moving some ICONs. I'm dead.....get it..!! I was killed in a mind field of dying brain cells, on a Desktop Mission.!! And the only "Weapons of Mass Destruction" were Icon's. So if someone wants my approval for something that looks like a Desktop with WOMD Icon's on it, you can just plumb forget it.!! I've learned my lesson with that sort of thing long ago as one can plainly see. BTW....My 85 year old mom doesn't have a computer, praise the lord.!!!! You know.....as you get older, you develop this thought that says... I think I'm beginning to get this universe figured out !! Then your parents call you on the cell. As the World turns.!!

Den2010
Den2010

Microsoft did away with the Back arrow in Vista's Explorer, and gave us bread crumbs in the address bar. There was impassioned feedback during the beta cycle to bring back the Back arrow. Microsoft maintained that their approach was better; end of discussion. The same controls exist now in Windows 7. And yet... I notice that in the Developer Preview, there's a Back arrow in Explorer. So here's the conclusion - Microsoft listens, but the message takes a r e a l l y l o n g t i m e to get answered. In this case, expect the Start Menu to return around, oh, say, Windows 9 or 10. The Metro UI looks very functional and appropriate for a touch-focused devise like a tablet, with a 7" or 10" screen. For a typical desktop, or for most notebooks, on the other hand, it's an obstacle to getting done what I want to do. All I want from Windows 8 is the ability to decide on the interface I want to use, and lock it in. I don't want different functionality between the two modes, Desktop and Metro. I don't want to have to switch back and forth to do my work. One interface, with full function - and you the user get to make the choice as to which interface that is. There - I've said that as plainly as I can. Is that impossible to deliver, Microsoft? Are enough people asking for this to give it serious consideration? I guess we'll know when the beta appears. For now, we've got a schizophrenic mess.

Darren B - KC
Darren B - KC

Microsoft has always been inclined to produce a pointless and ridiculous number of OS flavors and configurations, so how difficult would it be for them to design Windows 8 both ways and simply ask the user at install which type of interface they want to have? I thought it was supposed to include a "Windows 7 style" interface in there somewhere? (No, I haven't read the blog yet. I'm getting to it.) Personally, if Windows 8 doesn't have a Start Button/Taskbar style of interface that works like Windows 7, then I can tell you right now that I'll be running Windows 7 until Doomsday and beyond.

iantrent
iantrent

Since I won't be purchasing Win8 in any format, nor recommending it to anyone I know nor my employer, Im not "Freaking Out" at all. All that hype for Win 7 worked great and Im happy for now with it, no need to change.

grifs71
grifs71

With virtual appliances there is not going to be a need it the enterprise for huge bloated Windows operating systems. VMware apps would be more ROI than spending tens of thousands on rehashed Windows NT OSes. Look at Google Chrome OS this is where the future is headed, thin client computing not legacy monolithic, bloated out OSes that require non-stop patching and reboots.

mckinnej
mckinnej

Just looking at that is painful. I guess I don't really have much to worry about though. Our IT department wiped Win7 off this brand new laptop they gave me and installed XP instead. Based on our "progress" I'm guessing I'll be worm food long before anything like this hits our network.

pgit
pgit

I assume there'll be all sorts of after market applets to replace the start menu, I'm not particularly worried about what Microsoft is doing with metro. Remember tweakUI? There'll be similar, no doubt.

shacko
shacko

I don't like the new Metro UI squares, it reminds me of the old 8bit style video game. bring back icons and keep this interface for a phone (which I won't buy). Tablets will benefit from a touch interface but a computer monitor will blind you if it's that close for you to touch.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Who says it's not? You assume this is the only place we're expressing our displeasure. It isn't.

wompai
wompai

... Microsoft loses the metro interface, but keeps its style and applies it to the normal windows UI. Change the "aero glass" theme to the new windows 8 stylish theme. Also, if you just make the start menu a little bigger with the same icons or functionalities as a small metro screen on your desktop... Kinda "fuse'' the metro and startmenu. Also improve the search options, cuz win7 wasn't really good at it. Maybe these are some cool options.

Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin

There are a lot of excitable comments here today about a PRE-BETA OS system quite amazing really, difficult to comprehend why the whining is not to Microsoft because this is one of the reasons for releasing a developers pre-beta of the Win 8 proposed operating system. I think that this is a magnanimous gesture by Microsoft for once they can process and consolidate all the information received and incorporate the very best input into the OS. It is to your advantage is to let MS know of your input and lay off the some of the infantile pathetic rhetoric by certain individuals being bantered around here.

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

Yeah, and maybe the people at the UK tabloid 'The News of the World' would have liked that level of comment in their technology column.... ....MICROSOFT TO SELL NEW VERSION OF WINDOWS TO TOY MANUFACTURER I kinda like the idea of that headline. Seems to suit the UK press. :)

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

Separate versions didn't really work on XP - why step back to that? I'd rather have one OS with different interfaces that you can choose between based on your preference. The Metro UI is, after all, just a UI. If Linux can have different UI's over the basic Operating system then so can Windows. I'd much rather buy one version of a product and leave it at that. (Which reminds me, when is this nonsense of 'Windows basic, Windows home, Home premium, Professional, Ultimate, Rainbow, My little Pony, Apocalypse edition nonsense going to end?? Ship a single version please :) )

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

and it gets the much-loved 'Ribbon' menu system.

cquirke
cquirke

"Look at Google Chrome OS this is where the future is headed"... "non-stop patching"? Google basically takes over your system as a chew-toy client for the apps you have to visit on their big boxes - paying some telco for every byte that flows. If that reminds you of begging mainframe time in the pre-PC days, it should - ABM (IBM, Sun, Oracle et all) have been trying to wrench computing back ever since. Remember the "Net PC"? The clients aren't so thin that the server-based vendors won't use them to pick up the tab, whether it's offloading processing, using you as an ashtray for their cookies, or spreading the distribution load a la torrents. The changes are that the vendor retains control over their software, while you relinquish control over your cloudy data, server-side settings, and the code on your own system. Yup, that's the future... if you let it.

rpollard
rpollard

Honestly, I think they could come up with something better but I believe it needs to be as far away from the current interface as are the squares. People, they are relying on you to come up with an acceptable interface. They have no internal talent when it comes to interface design. Help them get to a brilliant design change for their interface as opposed to holding on to the old, clunky, "Start menu" style interface with a death grip. Change Windows for the better so they can get past their age old design and maybe come up with something that will get them caught up with current interfaces.

Lazarus439
Lazarus439

or that Microsoft doesn't monitor TR and similar sites....

jmoore
jmoore

Your right dude they are a little immature in their statements but really you sound like you're a step away from old man slippers and a glass of sherry and a kiss, kiss from old mumsie.

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

......that MS will take all the spitting and moaning on tech site comment pages like this and seriously consider it equally alongside genuine feedback fired at them directly through the proper channels? While they may take stuff like this as an indication of the mood of the community you have to remember that negative comment shines much brighter on Internet forums and such than similar positive expressions. Any big software company knows this and probably adjusts the amount of notice they take accordingly. I wonder if MS's interns sorting though feedback from sites like this have a poster on the wall saying 'Haters gonna hate'? Haha - amusing thought. Still, I always did hate that saying - it's as stupid as getting so heated about pre-beta software in the first place. Point is - yep, express displeasure and feature requests and positive experiences to MS through the channels they set up for this. All honest feedback (positive and negative) will help the final product be all that we want it to be.

Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin

Hi jmore..., And I always thought that I was a younger 70 year old? I suppose one really does lose a little patience as one gets older., But on the other hand is that a bad thing. When I retired all my old colleagues most of whom I had trained took me down to the pub for a few pints and thanked me for all I had done for there careers..and the odd kick up the arse when they where dreaming was in retrospect justifiably deserved! I do have a pair of slippers [rarely used] not a lover of sherry but I do like a few hours in the pub though, and "old mumsie" is 30 years younger than me and the CEO of her own network company and when she is relaxing likes a kiss and a cuddle ......and so do I!

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

yep, Palmetto, I agree - getting to the reasons for the hatred is very important and could help W8 be a better product. What would make this easier if the 'haters' that I jokingly referred to actually took their bilious comments, worked out what they hated and gave that feedback constructively to MS instead of going: "Oh Noes!1!!1. No strt butn!!! How can I haz find lolcatz nao? Roflrofl." or even worse a flat-out: "I hate it and am not upgrading. MS suck!" That way we all win. We're an intelligent bunch of people, us Tech-heads. Sometimes the way we can put about our criticism doesn't paint as as such, if you see what I mean :)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

What's important is determining if there are legitimate reasons for their hatred. Me, I don't hate W8. It's too early for that. What I want to see is MS respond to complaints that this very early version appears to emphasis touch devices over conventional desktops and laptops. If Metro is a better interface model for those systems, MS hasn't done a very good job of demonstrating it yet, but it's still early. If it isn't a better way of interacting with these traditional systems, then fix it.

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