Windows

Survey: What's next after Windows XP?

Windows XP support is ending in April, and Tech Pro Research is conducting a survey to find out what companies are planning to do next.
Microsoft is ending Windows XP support on April 8, and earlier articles on TechRepublic showed that quite a few companies hadn't made solid plans about how to handle the change from this OS.

Tech Pro Research is conducting a survey to find out what companies plan to do as a result of the change. Will you take the opportunity to move on to non-Windows products? Or will you opt for Windows 8 or Windows 8.1? Will there be fewer desktop PCs in the post-XP world?

Please take our survey and let us know more about your plans for post-Windows XP support from Microsoft. If you'd like a free copy of the research report, normally available only to Tech Pro Research subscribers, you'll have the option of entering your email address at the end of the survey.


About

Teena Hammond is a Senior Editor at TechRepublic. She has 20 years of journalism experience as an editor and writer covering a range of business and lifestyle topics. More than 2,000 of her published articles have appeared online and in books, newspa...

13 comments
alex_den
alex_den

I've done already movement to Linux (Kubuntu) on my office computer and just happy after that. No viruses, no any problems with MS updating (100% CPU load). There's no sense to move to Windows 7 - soon it'll be closed for selling, and soon it will be with Windows 8... I'm with Linux more then 5 years and it is still there. Quite smooth update twice a year, no necessity to reinstall sw. Good luck. RIP Windows XP!

Regulus
Regulus

LINUX !!!.  Personal favorite tactic is to partition the unused portion of the XP drive and load Ubuntu (no cost) on that partition.  On boot you will have the opportunity to go either XP or Ubuntu.  Ubuntu is fully intuitive.  If you can do XP you will find your way around in Ubuntu.  You will have access to all of your XP docs and be able to open them in Ubuntu with Libre Office (no cost - included) with little or no difficulty.  

Please leave a voluntary donation to the Ubuntu people - they are worth it.

Have a good new year.

FloridaPoint
FloridaPoint

Depending... always depending... but a great transition and huge step forward (in OS power and reliability, cost and future growth) from XP into a machine with great ability, flexibility and scalability using open-source office-apps is the Apple Mac Mini, also benefitting by disconnecting the monitor, keyboard and mouse from the PC and just plugging them into the Mac Mini.  Cool, cost-saving swapping, indeed.


Cautions in going from XP to WIN 8.0: If you don't install anti-virus and anti-malware on your WIN 8.0 machine first thing after you plug everything together and start it up, and if you next then do not run both apps before you ask the machine to search for any installed system, app or bloatware program updates... you'll be sooooorrrrryyyyy.


The learning curve is minimal going from MS to MAC; it's pretty much a nightmare going from XP to WIN 8.0 or 8.1.  For example, going to MAC you will NOT have to Google "How do I shut down a Windows 8.0 machine?" (No joke; check out the question.  The answer, by the way is: You have to install the WIN 8.1 upgrade to get away from WIN 8.0 in order to get back to an XP-type of simple shut-down.  Sound unbelievable?  Remember, WIN8.0 comes from Microsoft.)


Here's a simple way to validate what your or your client's employees would like to see happen in a transition from XP.  Among several considerations, explore via a memo the idea of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) or BYOT (Bring Your Own Technology), in which employees are given the option to bring and use their own mobile or laptop devices to connect to corporate IT network systems and data.  When we explored what employees of one of the three largest US banks were using at their office and at home without a BYOT in place, the bank furnished 100% desktop and laptop Microsoft Windows opsys PCs from a single national vendor/manufacturer.  For their personal, home and educational uses, however, almost 90% of those same employees surveyed used -- and bought at their own, unreimbursed expense -- MACs and other Apple or Droid devices.  


As they discussed their PC use at their desk, they continued to apologize, "I'm sorry, this thing is running so slowly again today.  I wish I could bring my Apple to work."

xmechanic
xmechanic

I work and live in a relatively financially depressed area of the south-west U.S., and my customers generally try to keep their PC's and laptops longer than most... 7-8 years and more. The loss of support for XP is finally becoming a reality, and I have several older machines here to demo Mint-Linux and a few others, and how they can keep their current hardware, and switch to a system that operates very similar to XP, and yet has a host of great features that XP never could, not to mention the fact that Linux is (almost) virus-free. At least 95% of the applications that people used in XP are available in similar packages for Linux, and for office applications, there's Libre Office or Apache Open Office, which easily read & edit M$ documents up to Office 2010. Pidgin handles most IM apps like Aim, Yahoo Messenger, etc. and generally Video4Linux can handle the go-between for most video chat extensions.


Generally takes 30 to 45 minutes to install, upgrade, and add in apps that they will most likely use, and another hour to copy their data that I saved previously to an external drive, put it in the proper places, and restore their Thunderbird e-mail settings, address book, and mailboxes; and copy their bookmarks back over for Firefox and/or MSIE. 


Wireless usually works out of the box, and most semi-modern video chips/cards support Linux, even if the drivers are sometimes not open-source. They don't really mind, they just want a machine that works, and isn't constantly getting infected by the latest virus/trojan attack.


As compared to the price of going out and buying even a 'low-end' PC or laptop, it's *still* cheaper for them to have me switch them to Linux, especially after they've tried to deal with Windows 8 and literally sent their  new machines back to the manufacturers because the OS is completely alien to what they've gotten used to... and the manufacturer can't or won't give them a 'downgrade' option to Win7 or another O.S. (e.g. Linux), because of draconian warranty requirements. Linux, and *especially* Linux-Mint, has made it easy for them ...and myself to have a viable option with their current equipment.


I currently have 1 Win7 PC and 1 XP-based laptop that I still use mainly for reference when dealing with the die-hard Windows users, but everything else in my shop is Linux or Mac OSX now. It allows me to spend a lot more time dealing with my customer's problems, rather than my own. :-)


Dave Land 

Land Computer Service

wwgorman
wwgorman

With so many people still using Windows XP I do not understand why Microsoft does not offer to continue support for a yearly fee payable in advance. Frankly, Microsoft's 64 bit offering of Windows 7 isn't ready for "Prime Time" yet. The 32 bit version of Win 7 is fine. However, you'll recall that to upgrade from Windows XP to Windows 7 you have to do a clean install which means individually putting back in all your programs unless you can get Norton Ghost or other back up program to work for you. Of course, you can do a simple upgrade to Windows Vista if you can find the program to purchase.

ericswain
ericswain

I am an IT Consultant who works with a range of businesses coming from Mom and Pop SMB's to Fortune 500 companies and I have seen a trend of SMB's migrating their older XP box's to off the shelf Win8 / 8.1 systems with the larger further integrated companies road mapping the migration towards Win 7. With the move to more SaaS and Cloud Based environments the biggest incentive to move on from the 32bit OS is the ability to run modern browsers that are RAM intensive. Windows 7 does a better job at memory management then XP and  as we shift our applications from on-board processing to cloud based processing the needs of our computer requirements are shifting as well. I could have made an argument at the beginning of last year that many businesses were still fighting the migration but by now most Enterprises have tested and have or are in the process of deploying Windows 7 or greater. I see Windows 7 as the new XP that IT Departments across the globe will be fighting to leave once migrated. I am sure we will revisit this topic in 2020 when the Extended EOL comes up for Windows 7.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Windows XP has been out for close to 13 years. For most people they had their computer for 7+ years. With typical computer prices, that would come out to maybe $70 a year. Most Win XP users knew that this end of support was coming. For those in a company, if they say they can't afford the upgrade costs then it is clearly bad management.

Gudufl
Gudufl

I can not believe your arogance or maybe it is ignorance but certainly it is incompetence that the Middel East and Africa are not included in the demographic question in this survey. We might only make up a small percentage of IT users globaly but we take serious offence in being left out.

Luke-IT
Luke-IT

I am an IT Consultant and about 45% of my Clients simply cannot afford the huge cost of upgrading their old machines and software to Windows 7. None of them want Windows 8. Fortunately I found an incredible Linux operating system called Robolinux that runs all Windows applications 100% immune to viruses and malware sand boxed inside a highly innovative Windows XP or 7 virtual machine that installs in less than 10 seconds. The result is outstanding and the cost is so reasonable they really can afford it. Check it out.

craigc
craigc

@Gudufl Seriously? Get a life.  I'm sure LOTS of non complaining folks were 'left out'. 

Grow up a little.

yorkshirepudding
yorkshirepudding

@Luke-IT Couple of issues with this - firstly, if there machines can't run Windows 7, how do they run linux with Windows running in a VM?  The cost from Robolinux is just for a pre-packaged VM of XP or Win7, which you have to apply your own licence key to.  So, you have two potential costs there - upgrading the PC to handle a VM, and licence for XP/Win7, if you don't already have one you can use.


Secondly, the claim of 100% immunity to viruses and malware is highly questionable as Gisabun stated.  Also, as Cryptolocker can encrypt mapped drives, I'm can't see how this protects it.


I am surprised that an IT consultant would simply repeat the claims of this company, but then this isn't the first forum you've promoted this on, is it (http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/CryptoLocker-Ransomware-Spreading/story.xhtml?story_id=012001C8R8E0 - see first comment).

Gisabun
Gisabun

@Luke-IT You are a walking advertisement. "100% immune to viruses and malware...." So you are one of those people who think that Linux is completely immune to anything nasty? Good luck! "Runs all Windows applications" - So that means [by your definition] that the OS isn't immune since if you ran Acrobat it could be vulnerable to something. "Installs in less than 10 seconds". Ya right.

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