Windows 8 optimize

Take a look at two great features in Windows 8.1

The new Windows 8.1 Start Screen and the new Snap feature may make you rethink some of the modern interface's shortcomings.

windows_8.1_logo.png
While I didn't particularly care for the concept of combining the tablet user interface with the desktop user interface when Windows 8 came out, I have to admit that after using Windows 8.1 for the last couple of months, I think I'm starting to come around. I'm not sure if my resolve is simply giving way to the inevitable fact that Microsoft isn't going to give up on the combined user interface or whether the changes that they made in this iteration of Windows 8 are really an improvement on the concept. I guess I have to say that it is a little of both.

Now don't think that I've completely fallen under their spell. I still feel that the complete removal of the old Start menu from Windows 8 was a travesty and that return of the Start Button in Windows 8.1 is a halfhearted effort. But, since I am still a fervent user of Start Menu Reviver, which I enthusiastically endorsed last summer in my article The Windows 8 Start Menu reimagined and reinvigorated, I have been able to overlook this sleight of hand and really begin to appreciate some of the other enhancements in Windows 8.1 - namely the new Start Screen and the new Snap feature that allows you to have more than two modern apps open on the screen at one time.

In this article, I'll take a closer look at these new Windows 8.1 features and discuss why I like them.

Modern Apps

While I still feel like the modern apps design goes against the grain when it comes to using a desktop computer for the type of work that is traditionally done on these machines, I am not missing the fact that many modern apps are things of beauty and really interesting to use. The high quality user interface imagery and the unique way they display content makes them intriguing. And over time, I have found that I really like to use certain modern apps on my desktop system after I'm done working with my real applications in the desktop user interface. However, working with modern apps in Windows 8 was a bit kludgy. Fortunately, I have found that the new features I mentioned in the introduction make using modern apps in Windows 8.1 much better.


Step-by-step: Update to Windows 8.1 through the Windows Store


The new Start Screen

As I mentioned, I said that I like Start Menu Reviver, yet I also said that I like the new Windows 8.1 Start Screen. While this might sound like a contradiction, it's really not. You see, I use Start Menu Reviver to launch all of my desktop applications and I use the Start screen to launch all of my modern apps.

So, now when I access the Start Screen to begin using the modern apps that I enjoy, Windows 8.1 provides two improvements that make the Start Screen more palatable. First, when you switch from your Desktop, as shown in Figure A, to the Start Screen, its background is now transparent allowing your Desktop wallpaper to show, as shown in Figure B.

Figure A

Fig A 11-27.png

When you switch from the desktop…

Figure B

Fig B 11-27.png

…to the Start Screen, having the same wallpaper makes the transition less abrupt.

In Windows 8, when you switched from the Desktop to the Start Screen, it was like going to a separate user interface. The Start Screen background would be a solid color or some goofy pattern on that solid color. It was really a disconcerting switch. In fact, that was one thing that really turned people off about the Start Screen. Now that the Start Screen has the same background as the Desktop, switching to the Start Screen is more like bringing up a menu rather than launching a foreign application.

The second improvement to the Start Screen is the ability to choose a wider variety of sizes for the tiles. In Windows 8 you had two choices: Larger and Smaller. In Windows 8.1, you now have four choices: Small, Medium, Wide, and Large, as shown in Figure C.

Figure C

Fig C 11-27.png

When you right click a tile and then and select Resize, you now have four choices for the tile size.

The new Snap feature

Another frustrating limitation in Windows 8 was that fact that you could only have two modern apps on the screen at one time. And in most cases, one app was on 1/4 of the screen and the other app was taking up the remaining 3/4. In Windows 8.1, you can evenly split the screen between two modern apps, as shown in Figure D. Having the even split makes it easier to simultaneously work in two apps.

Figure D

Fig D 11-27.png

Having an even split makes it easier to work in two apps at the same time.

And best of all, the Snap shortcut keystrokes will allow you to easily switch the windows' positions. Just press the [Windows] key along with the left or right arrow keys and the windows will shift positions. Select a window and press the [Windows] key along with the up arrow and that window will be maximized.

If, while you have two apps on the screen, you open a third, that app will appear as a large thumbnail in the middle of the screen, as shown in Figure E. You'll then see the thumbnail tilt back and forth indicating that it can replace either one of the apps currently on the screen.

Figure E

Fig E 11-27.png

When you open a third app, if will appear in the middle of the screen as a large thumbnail image.

However, if you drag it to the gap in the middle of the screen, the app will take up the middle third of the screen, as shown in Figure F. Alternatively, if you press the [Windows] key along with the left or right arrow keys, the thumbnail will shift positions and when it is in the position you want, press [Enter] and it will pop into place. Being able to have multiple apps open on the screen at one time can be convenient in many situations. Now, if you have really high res monitor, you could even have four apps open on the screen at the same time.

Figure F

Fig F 11-27.png

You can place the third app in the middle of the screen.

You can even drag the desktop into the mix, as shown in Figure G. This can really expand your horizons.

Figure G

Fig G 11-27.png

You can even bring the desktop into the same screen as your apps.

What's your take?

I've found that the new Start Screen and the new Snap feature make Windows 8.1 more palatable as I move back and forth between using my Desktop applications and my modern apps. Of course, using Start Menu Reviver also helps me keep things separated. What do you think about these new Windows 8.1 features? As always, if you have comments or information to share about this topic, please take a moment to drop by the TechRepublic Community Forums and let us hear from you.

Also read:

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

64 comments
BartSchroder
BartSchroder

I often have at least 8 apps open (Word, Excel, Skype, Labview, Quartus, MultiEdit, Nios, Cleverscope), and I want to put them anywhere on my two screens with any size. Some of the apps have multiple windows. Sometimes I want to open an app that I can't remember the name for, and in the old start bar I could browse around and find it. That Windows 8 didn't out-of-the-box allow for this is beyond comprehension. The Windows 8/8.1 modern interface sucks.

asor
asor

How do i get the safe mode  screen at the start up on windows 8.1 in all others versions it was (F8 at the start) but not in win 8.1!!!

eye4bear
eye4bear

After 2 years plus of use and I still HATE the Modern UI and thus run Start 8 booting directly into the desktop.

danwat1234
danwat1234

This whole article appears to be about Windows 8.1's bla bla GUI updates. That is meaningless for those of us that run Start8 or other software that disables Metro and brings back the Win7 start menu.


What Windows 8.1 brings for us from Windows 8.0 is native 3D printer support and improved security for pass the hash attacks.


What I would really like to see with Windows 8.2 is an update to explorer.exe so that it will finally have full support for file paths longer than 255 characters in length. This is a very annoying limitation that occurs frequently in deeply nested folders on my computer. I have to use Totalcommander to do the operation I ought to do with Explorer. NTFS itself has support for file paths longer than 10,000 characters I believe.

Also, start using "MiB" and "GiB' instead of "MB" and "GB" where applicable. When you are stating a capacity in the base 2 system, use "MiB" or "GiB" and when stating a capacity in the base 10 system, use "MB" or "GB" please! It confuses a lot of users into thinking that their hard drive isn't as big as it should be.


Also make the task manager more code efficient, take longer to load than the Windows 7 task manager.

phscnp
phscnp

"Being able to have multiple apps open on the screen at one time can be convenient in many situations."

Yes, I really quoted that directly from the article.  We seem to have regressed to a state a little before Windows 3.1.  For 40 years, yes 40 years, the ability to display multiple apps positioned by the user according to their needs was simply a given.  What next, a mobile phone with a block mode terminal interface?


It is incredibly painful to watch our industry work in a state of total amnesia; each new "innovation" simply forgets what came before.  Usually this is limited to treating security as an afterthought, but it seems to be getting much worse now.

If the auto industry acted this way, we would have cars with only one door:  The driver-side door to the rear seat.

DonG43
DonG43

I discussed the new interface with my network admin son-in-law.  He stated, "As a 30 year IT professional who uses desktop applications to get work done, you must hate Windows 8."  But his parents, casual users who surf the internet and check email, love it.  It is all in your perspective of what you want to do on the PC.  To me, an operating system is a tool to allow me to store files and execute such applications as Excel, Access, Word and Outlook.  His parents use the terms Windows, Microsoft and Word interchangeably.  They have never heard of Windows Explorer.  To them, Windows 8 is perfect for what they want to do.  It is terrible for what I want to do.

dmhbrighthouse
dmhbrighthouse

The term "Modern" refers to the *name* of the interface, no (as opposed to the *type*)? In this case, shouldn't every occurrence of "modern" in the article be "Modern"?

Okans
Okans

How about MS having released a Win 8 for the surface and another for the not surface users? Probably a lot of headache would have been eased. Back home in East Africa surface mobiles and laptops are rare. Even so, a surface mobile comes installed with Android. MS should take care....

alijcam
alijcam

How about these allegories:

On Windows 7 and the 8 desktop, you can have multiple WINDOWS.

On 8-modern you have one window with 2 (or3) PANES.

So, should we call it Window Pain?

info
info

So I'm playing with Snap and it's not as easy to use as the article makes it sound. I just recently installed the Gmail app was force to change my login to my Hotmail account and now I have to take two extra clicks to get to the documents that are stored on my computer. Also the Gmail app takes forever to load.

I'm glad I can boot directly to the desktop and I'm going to install Start Menu Reviver and give it a shot so I can free up the Task Bar space

As IT business consultant the only time I can emphatically endorse W8.1 is if they are buying a touchscreen laptop or computer (all in one)

bruceb
bruceb

I'm in IT doing desktop support, so needing to know win8/8.1 is necessary. But without a touchscreen, it's a real pain.An exercise in futility.

 I've upgraded my primary desktop from win7 to win 8, and onto 8.1 . Trial by fire.  It seems to boot faster, but I had a rough time with it, trying to find hotkey combos and other shortcuts to be able to do what I did on win7 or xp for that matter. Without a touchscreen , you're up a creek without a paddle. 

  BTW, I own a Windows 8 phone, a Lumia 925 that I absolutely love.  The interface just makes sense on this device. And it's fast.  When the Windows code bases finally merge, and desktop touchscreens (or touchpads?) make some inroads,   that will be a winner.   
jeltez42
jeltez42

I have made peace with Windows 8 and 8.1. I have my much needed Start Menu toolbar and deleted all but a few (less than 5) cr-apps. I run desktop versions of software which are much more stable and have far fewer bugs. The Start Screen still sucks but it is not the evilness I first thought it to be. I removed all but the most important tiles and have managed to keep it at one page. The full list is 5 pages long (5 full swipes across the screen) and I don't really have all the software loaded on my machine. 

The performance increase is worth the small inconveniences. I do like the flexibility as my laptop can also be a tablet.  It took at most 30 min to get things the way I wanted. Windows 8.1 starts much quicker and that comes in very handy. The only thing I did NOT like was having to reinstall ALL of my software after doing the upgrade to 8.1.  If this is still the same, my other server/laptop will NOT be getting upgraded from Windows 8.

Professorcad
Professorcad

Modern apps? You cannot differentiate between the tile-based apps and desktop apps with the name "modern" because most desktop apps are modern! It's worth considering whether the tile apps that are written in JavaScript/Html could turn out to be more of a security risky than desktop exe files. We shall see. 

In terms of the tiles GUI (I think the icons are a bit naff, but they do their job), if you have a touch enabled desktop screen then you had better get yourself down to the gym and pull some serious weights - holding your arm up to the screen throughout the day is very demanding - I remember this from the days of 'light pens' on CAD workstations (Computer Aided Design).

chapman_henry
chapman_henry

Greg Schultz is the master of Window 8.0 and 8.1. His articles are the stellar best. Thanks Greg.

rtroy56
rtroy56

Windows Ape is still unusable for anyone other than toddlers, chimps, apes and dogs who like pretty colored squares on the screen.

goodhikers
goodhikers

Waiting to upgrade to Win8 was a mistake!  As a power-user I am very disappointed in the tech advice I received in the last year, i.e. don't upgrade to Win8 because "it is really only optimized for touch-screen users"  or "the start button is gone!"    I finally upgraded to Win8.1 and couldn't be happier.  I just treat the start screen as a better, more visually pleasing start button--all my most important programs are pinned there as well as the newer "live screen" apps.  Everything else is faster and the desktop isn't much different than before.  Sorry I listened to advice from my tech advisors--they are stuck in "start button" past and have lost my confidence.

shel10_z
shel10_z

Haven't loaded 8.1 yet. I see the same problem as I saw in 8.0. The new OS is designed for entertainment purposes. A business user would need to spend several hours re-arranging the start screen to their needs. The good thing about versions 3.0 to 7.0 is that the start screen was sparsely loaded and the user could easily add icons for the most used items. Given that 90 percent of current Windows users are running XP, Vista,or 7.

I'm certain that there are many 12 year-olds, and individuals in their 80s, who will like 8.0/8.1, and Microsoft is only hiding its collective heads in the sand if they think they are going to beat Android, or Apple as the tablet OS. I should not be forced to pay for an OS and then pay for a UI.

dan
dan

I have to agree with Zynn, as a tech type person if you are missing the start menu, I really do feel that you should probably look at another occupation. Any user who has a tech tell them to install a third party application to use Windows 8/8.1 should be getting a new tech. I have an 82 year old female client who went from XP to win 8 and after 15 minutes of tuition is able to use Win 8 happily.

Ken Dally
Ken Dally

The interface is still bloody awful for a desktop situation. That I have to install hird party utilities so that people can use Windows 8.1 is a very poor situation. Still I suppose Stradock and it's shareholders are happy.

rickscr
rickscr

A little off topic but I had a quick look at Start Menu Reviver and liked what I saw in the demo video.  I investigated  8.0 a year ago and decided that without a touch screen it made little sense and certainly had no advantages for our desktop users that I could see.

My thought is that in a touch centric environment Windows 8.1 is worth a second look. I can see giving it a go again on a touchscreen laptop platform.

I'm not sure what the consensus in market place is as there seems two trains of thought on that issue but I am thinking MS will be around for a while in spite of the 8.0 debacle and the possibilities around the touch interface are worth looking into further.

That said there are no thoughts at this point around migrating our desktop users to Windows 8.x any time soon.

DaveDopp
DaveDopp

  To those touting Win8.1 as a success; you're probably wrong.  According to Microsoft's last earnings report in October, Windows 8 was the only disappointing segment of their business.  Sales were off 7 percent compared to LY.  Steve Balmer has "resigned", although a BOD source says he was encouraged to leave sooner rather than later.

This is the usual outcome for a CEO who stumbles.  The fact that Microsoft still won't release accurate sales numbers for Win8 is also a telling indicator.  I agree that Win8 is likely to be the "New Coke" for Microsoft.

zynn
zynn

I find it a little sad that as a tech person you missed the Start Menu.  If users had been given the information they needed such as "hit the window key and just type" or "open the Store App and just type" they might not have felt the need to whine about a Start Menu.  Everything was at your fingertips......less mouse involvement!

I find the whole bring back the Start Menu annoying.  I much prefer the search feature in Windows 8.  I have 8.1 on one of my computers but will hold out on the others because I find it much easier to "just type" !

rbaer
rbaer

Try ModernMix from Stardock for just $5.  It only does two things, but does them extremely well.  First it lets you choose application by application whether to open a Modern app on the Win8 menu, or windowed on the desktop.  You can switch how apps open very easily, and it automatically opens an app in the same place you last closed it.  Second, it lets you actually close apps rather than just suspend them.  Both of these features should have been in 8.1!  But for now I have ModernMix on all of my Win8.1 boxes...

toph36
toph36

Using the Desktop with the Snap feature.... You could have 2 (or more) Desktop applications open at the same time, along side one (or more) modern apps. On my home. PC, I may have IE and Windows Media Center going in the Desktop, while reading the news or playing a game in a modern app. Works great. This wasn't possible in 8.0.

BRS
BRS

Great For IT fixers had the biggest no of call outs to regrade to Windows 7 And as for questions from house holders how to, how to, how to.  If ever there was an example of "If it ain't broke don't fix it" Windows 8 and 8.1 must go down in the text books of IT Miss-management

Stocklone
Stocklone

One of the best features of 8.1 and modern apps is the ability for apps to be started in 50% mode from notifications and modern apps being able to open up other modern apps in 50% mode.  This aspect is actually far superior to the original desktop implementation of multi-tasking because it does it AUTOMATICALLY. If modern apps ever gain the functionality of their desktop counterparts, I will most definitely live in the metro world instead of the desktop.

rwnorton
rwnorton

It appears to me that whether you like Windows 8.x or not is dependent on the context of your computing experience.  There are a number of us who enjoy the convenience of tablets, yet have been disappointed in their inability to run business applications, readily join enterprise networks, and sometimes even do simple things like print to the printers on our network.  For us, Windows 8.x, while not perfect, hits the "sweet spot".  (I suspect we are also mostly people who have strong enterprise desktop backgrounds and recognize that there are contexts in which the desktop simply works best, yet other contexts in which the "Modern" tablet interface works best.)

Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but opinions are born out of the context of our own experience and it perplexes me that those who do not like Windows 8.x so often feel compelled to bash not only Microsoft but also those of us who happen to like Windows 8.x, instead of recognizing that there are a (growing) number of us for which Windows 8.x is the right solution.

I'm no longer in an Enterprise environment, but if I were, I strongly suspect that my standard "office" users would be on Windows 7, but my executives and all sorts of "road warriors" (sales, service, travelling managers, etc.) would be on Windows 8.x.   And as for BYOD, I'm sure I'd much rather deal with a Windows 8.x device than iOS or Android.  My experience now (during my retirement) is with supporting Small Business Networks and Users - and the results are mixed with regard to those who have gone to Windows 8.x (mostly due to purchasing a new computer with it pre-installed).  In all cases, they are non-touchscreen devices.  Many don't like it (initially at least), and some do.  Yet, all of them have no problem whatsoever getting their jobs done with it.

IMHO, I can work, travel, and play with one device that nearly perfectly meets all three needs.  What's not to like?

kitekrazy
kitekrazy

Interesting what has become "features" these days.  It seems MS takes Apple's ideas and excel at making them worse.   I don't care for these app stores.  Check out how bad Zinio reader is on W8.  

  MS started a distro movement with XP and Vista. They could do the same and have a desktop edition of W8. I never trust MS sales figures.  You don't hear about the returns of laptops because W8 doesn't work for the average consumer.  

  Forcing users to adapt to something new does not translate into much larger profits.  It was predicted on this site that Ballmer would be bad for MS. They were so right. He was great for Apple.

  Windows Ih8 is the Coke II and Schlitz Beer.  While it's useable but not preferable. 

ellrllgllo
ellrllgllo

I've done more "backwards installation" from Windows 8 to Windows 7 this year, than I've ever done in my entire life. While I can find my way around any OS, I don't think Microsoft had the consumer in mind when releasing Windows 8. Just a thought....

lorint
lorint

I truly can't believe how belligerent Microsoft has become in the last two years.  And the situation is really much worse for them than what simple sales numbers indicate.  What is truly happening in people's minds?  About the whole brand itself even?  Not simply in Joe Q Consumer's mind where it's easy for them to change their mind, but more importantly the mindset of industry professionals who devote their life to the product?  Many have simply given up on the platform.  I am one of them.  I used to be a very strong supporter of Microsoft products.  For three years I was recognized as an MVP, which is quite an honor.  And I still love SQL Server, Sharepoint, and most things about Visual Studio.  But as good as those products are, it's not good enough to outweigh my hatred for what is happening to the core OS.  After waiting a year to see if Redmond would pivot, I've given up on them, and for the past 6 months I've re-tooled my skill set completely to Apple.  XCode, Postgres, and Ruby on Rails is what I'm mostly focused on.  Microsoft's tiles are a complete waste of time.  A total dead-end.

Spending massive amounts on advertising will not fix the horrific damage that's already been done.  The creative talent has already been forced into greener pastures.

Farewell, Microsoft.

alfred
alfred

All of this messing about to get a few bits of screen in place seems to me a poor substitute for what I used to have. With a 24" screen I can have two programs of reasonable size on screen but in XP I had MSDVM (now not available) which allowed one click access to 4 screens I had instant access to up to 4 full screen programs or 8 half screens. Windows 8.1 is an improvement on Windows 8 since I can now work about 20% faster but still at less than half the speed of Windows XP. Make MSDVM available on Win 8.1 and it will be worth having. 

eric.p
eric.p

Overall, I have been pleased with the changes in Windows 8, and especially 8.1. I think it's mostly a learning curve of getting used to different ways of doing things, and once you understand the new techniques, you often find they're better than the old way.  I understand many users don't want to learn a new paradigm, so MS could have perhaps retained some of the old techniques (as they have restored some of them in 8.1) and allowed people a while to get used to the new abilities, but there are hazards along that path, too.

Anyway, I say to each his own, and if you haven't played with it yet, try it with an open mind and a willingness to learn a slightly different way of doing things, and you might find you really like it.

kliss
kliss

I mostly agree with Charlie, but perhaps if you covered some of the apps that you are using on the Metro side, that might help explain the advantages of that area. The only app that i have found that came close to replacing a desktop program is internet explorer and i don't find using the IE app to be convenient at all. Are you using the IE app? Do any of the apps you are using replace desktop functions? What kind of apps are there that will take me away from the desktop and still allow me to get my work done? If I am going to go over to the metro side, i need something useful to do.

DonG43
DonG43

Funny, we purchased a Win 8 touchscreen laptop.  The next day I bought a mouse for it.

toastytheog
toastytheog

@bruceb I went out and got a logitech t650 for use with my windows 8 machine. It's not as nice as the magic trackpad for mac (my main machine at work), but it really makes a difference in the usability.

gene_edmiston
gene_edmiston

As an IT consultant for almost 30 years, I have run just about every O/S from CPM to Windows 8.1, including some mainframe, Apple, and Radio Shack ones.  I currently maintain a WIn7 environment along with a Win8 tablet and Win8/8.1 desktop O/S and VMs.  As @goodhikers did, I just treat the Win8/8.1 Start screen as the old Start Menu and move on...it took me a couple of weeks on my Win8 tablet to figure it out.  As I have trained many Win8 newbies, I just tell them to think of the Start Screen as the old Start Menu and they say "well, that is simple" and their transition to Win8.x accelerates dramatically.

pdriddell
pdriddell

@Ken Dally I agree Stardock is an excellent product and the only reason I ageed to go Win8 on my new laptop instead of Win7. I very seldom use the modern interface and often joke that I am using Win dowsv7.5.

Microsoft really missed the boat by not incorporating an app like Stardock that allows a Microsoft user to continue to be productive immediately while learning the new modern menu at your leisure. No down time by having to learn a piece of software. If Microsoft pulls another boner like this I'll be dumping their sorry ass.

Funny I have never heard someone say I regret moving to the Apple platform.

Are you listening Microsoft?!!! 

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Users don't like to type.  That's why the GUI was invented in the first place.

I find reliance on the search feature vaguely insulting.  It implies I don't know where anything is on my own freakin' system, that I have to perform a search like some newbie who doesn't know where anything should be installed.  It's like have to use a GPS every time I go to places I visit daily.

gvtooker
gvtooker

@rwnorton Where many of us feel that Microsoft failed is that they tried to implement a "one size fits all" approach with Win8, and as could be expected it didn't work out well. Obviously there are niche users like yourself where it does work, and as long as it does the job for you, that's what counts.

From the standpoint of a desktop user or conventional laptop, Win8 leaves no real incentive to migrate away from Win7 or XP for that matter. Not everybody appreciates going through the learning curve to learn the ropes of a new OS, dealing with initial release bugs, or forking over the funds to upgrade simply because it is Microsoft's newest toy. Also due to the clunky interface for those not using touch screens, it leaves a bit to be desired both functionally and aesthetically. I'm sure (or at least hopeful) that Win8.1 will address these issues, but considering my experiences with this platform I don't think I'm going to bother to "upgrade" my personal machines until I see a real need.

But in the end, to each their own!

kitekrazy
kitekrazy

@ellrllgllo   My mom and her friend returned laptops bought on QVC.  Most retailers will have trouble selling W8 laptops without the touchscreen.

adornoe
adornoe

@lorint You're not credible at all.

One doesn't just instantly switch to Apple and XCode and Postgres and Ruby on Rails, because of some minor complaint with the "new" tiles interface.  Those "skills" you mentioned don't just magically get learned in the span of a year or less.  You already had those skills and you were already an Apple fanatic, but you needed to take the opportunity to bash Microsoft, as you were, apparently, an Apple fanatic already, and and Microsoft detractor.  

BTW, the tiles interface and the new Windows 8/8.1 OS, are doing quite well without you, as reports are that, it's already at about the same numbers of adoption as Windows 7 was at the same stage after release. 

RCawdor
RCawdor

@CharlieSpencer 

I completely agree, the majority of Windows users are not tech suave. So if anyone can agree with that they could also agree easier is better and in this case keeping it familiar is the easiest way. Most users also grew to know computers using a GUI, so they will find it easier than searches or keyboard shortcuts.

lorint
lorint

Au contraire, @adornoe.  Although I've had an iPhone for the past 4 years, I haven't owned any other Apple products before this.  My own initial thoughts when seeing the early betas of Windows were that hopefully there would be a registry hack to keep the Start menu if you wanted it.  I was appalled when the consumer preview removed it entirely.  But I thought OK, maybe they know what they're doing.  Will be a rocky transition for me to Metro, but hopefully there's a roadmap here.

In the year that followed the world consistently rejected the platform, and that was quite enough for me to start looking at what else is out there.  It's been a busy 6 months.  I put everything else aside and just studied.  And now two months ago I moved to Santa Monica and started work with a great education firm, General Assembly.  I don't envision transitioning back.  I do have a few more .NET projects to wrap up, and some Sharepoint training I'm doing for people, but at some point I will become 100% *nix.

My name is Lorin Thwaits, that is my story, and I am sticking to it.  Feel free to come out to Santa Monica sometime for coffee if you like.

adornoe
adornoe

@kitekrazy @adornoe @lorint The sales data cannot be faked, since it would get caught by the stockholders and the government auditors.  Sales data eventually translates to profits or no profits.  One cannot fake profits or lack thereof.  You need to go back to school.  


Obamacare cannot be used for analogy purposes anywhere, since it was doomed to be a failure from the start, and the failure is not just about the web site.  Get your thinking straight. 

lorint
lorint

Well, @adornoe, aren't you a free-loader at the core!

How about this -- next time you're in the LA area, drop me a line and we'll do coffee.  And maybe write a Rails app at the same time.  Bring ideas.

-L

adornoe
adornoe

@lorint @adornoe OH, btw, your story is still not credible. One doesn't study and then be magically fluent on the skills you mentioned in 6 months; experience is what most companies look for, and six months is not enough to build any kind of useful experience.  

You can like your story, and you can stick by it, but, nobody out here in the real world is going to believe that nonsense.

I live in Tampa, and I know quite well what it takes to learn a technical skill and build experience with it, and become experienced and fluent with it.  

And, the world you live in must be quite different from the real world, because, the real world is NOT consistently rejecting the new Windows 8 platform.  Reports are that adoption for Windows 8/8.1, is about the same as it was for Windows 7 after the same amount of time after release. 


Now, if you wish for me to come visit you in Santa Monica for a a coffee, I'll gladly accept your offer to purchase me a round-trip plane ticket from Tampa to California.  I'll even pick up the tab for your coffee and mine. 



 

adornoe
adornoe

@lorint @adornoe One person, YOU, is not an adequate sampling to consider Windows 8 a failure.

Anecdotal evidence from YOU as a single  user, is worthless.

The evidence is just recently coming out that Windows 8 is turning out to be as successful as Windows 7 was.  So, your data and your thoughts are completely useless.