Microsoft

The Windows 8 Start Menu reimagined and reinvigorated

With Start Menu Reviver you get the traditional functionality of the Start menu, but with a Windows 8 Modern UI look and feel.

Like many keyboard and mouse Windows 8 users, I wished that Microsoft had not completely removed the Start Menu from Windows 8. However, up until recently I have resisted the temptation to just install one of the many Start Menu replacements as I sought to really give the Windows 8 interface a chance. While I have had some feelings of success in this endeavor, I always seem to encounter a certain level of frustration using the Start screen or any of the workarounds that I have developed.

Then, we began hearing about Windows Blue/Windows 8.1 and there were rumors that the Start Menu would be making a comeback. Of course, I had my doubts that Microsoft would just plug a Windows 7 style Start menu in this new version of Windows 8. However, I held out hope that Microsoft was going to reimagine the Start Menu in a new form for Windows 8.1. But now that we have seen demos of Windows 8.1, we know that isn't going to happen.

Recently, I decided that enough was enough and began experimenting with some of the available Start menu replacements. I'd install one, use it for a while, uninstall it, and then install another one.

I initially tried Classic Shell and found that while did a very nice job of putting the old Start Menu back where it belonged, it just felt so, well, classic. I really liked Stardock's Start8 as it provided everything that I was used to plus more. I then tried IObit's Start Menu 8 and found that it was a really nice Start menu replacement. However, the more that I used these and some of the other Start Menu replacements, the less that I felt like I was using a new operating system.

Then I discovered Start Menu Reviver from ReviverSoft and was immediately impressed with the truly unique approach! With this app you get the traditional functionality of the Start menu, but with a Modern UI look and feel, as shown in Figure A. Beyond the look and feel, Start Menu Reviver is easy to use and has a very nice set of features that make the program very versatile and extremely useful. And, it's FREE.

In fact, Start Menu Reviver is such a great melding of the old and new user interfaces that if Microsoft had put something like this in Windows 8 from the get go they sure would have saved themselves a lot of grief. If they had put something like this in Windows 8.1, they would have been able to salvage the new operating system in the eyes of enterprise IT professionals.

Figure A

Start Menu Reviver employs a unique approach.

Now, I know that after reading this article some of you are going to think that I have gone off the deep end in my emphatic praise for this tool, but I can't help myself. Start Menu Reviver has really revived my excitement about Windows 8! So much so that if I were a Microsoft executive, I would seriously be looking to acquire ReviverSoft and incorporate this product into the operating system. Let's take a closer look.

Installation

Once you download Start Menu Reviver (.exe), installing the program is relatively easy. Just run the executable file, respond to the User Account Control prompt, and follow along with the onscreen prompts. The installation begins with a wizard interface and ends with a very nice set of video tutorials, as shown in Figure B.

Figure B

The video tutorials are quick and effective demos of the product's main features.

As you can see, there are tutorials for mouse and gestures. While I primarily use Start Menu Reviver on a system with a mouse, I've found that the tile based design of this menu works equally well on a touch based system. This is particularly true since the menu can be configured to display in three sizes Small, Medium, and Large, with the latter working very well for tablets.

Overview: versatility and integration

When you begin using Start Menu Reviver, you'll quickly discover how versatile the program is and marvel at how well it integrates into the new operating system's user interface with a minimum of interference. I said it earlier, but I'll say it again, Start Menu Reviver provides a great melding of the old and new user interfaces.

Once installed, you'll see that Start Menu Reviver gives you a Windows flag Start button that you can click to display the menu. Pressing the [Windows] key on your keyboard also brings up the menu. Alternatively, you can configure the program to display the Start Menu when you click the Start button, but display the Start Screen when you press the [Windows] key on your keyboard. (Lest I forget to mention it, the onscreen Start button image is customizable - you can choose from any of the ten provided button images.)

While the operation of the [Windows] key alone can change, all the other [Windows] key combinations remain unaffected. [Windows]+X still brings up the WinX menu, [Windows]+Q still brings up the Search Apps panel, [Windows]+C still opens the Charms bar, and so on.

You'll notice that Start Menu Reviver's Windows flag Start button is positioned a little to the right of the corner. The reason for this is that the pop-up Start Screen button is still available. The amount of space between the Start button and the hot corner prevents inadvertent interface collisions - you can easily click the Start button without accidentally activating the hot corner. And, you can easily glide by the Start button, hit the hot corner to display the pop-up button, and access the Start Screen just as Microsoft intended.

You can also access the Start Screen from the menu itself. As you can see in Figure A, the middle section of the menu is labeled Dashboard and clicking it will take you to the Start Screen. So, even though Start Menu Reviver provides you with an alternative to the Start Screen, it still makes it easy to access all your apps on the Start Screen. Furthermore, since Start Menu Reviver is a program running in the operating system rather than integrated into it, there is an Exit command that instantly closes the program and allows you to switch back to exclusively using the Start Screen, should you ever want to do so.

The program also has the ability to show the Desktop on startup - in a roundabout way. When you choose the option, the system will boot to the Start Screen and then switch to the Desktop. Not exactly what I expected, but it occurs very quickly and the ultimate result is the same.

In a fashion similar to the All Programs flyout menu on Windows 7's Start menu, Start Menu Reviver has the Apps flyout menu that can show Desktop Apps, Modern Apps, or both. With the flyout showing, you can pin Apps to the menu's tiles with a simple drag and drop. In addition to showing Apps, the flyout can also show recently accessed items or the contents of My Documents. There's also a Search box associated with the Apps flyout menu and it works just like the Start Search box in Windows 7's Start menu.

If the menu's default color scheme doesn't mesh with your desktop wallpaper and window colors, you can change it. Just delve into the Color Scheme tool and change the colors of five distinct items with access to the full spectrum of colors in Windows color palette.

At the top of the menu, you'll find My Computer and Internet Explorer icons. At the bottom right of the menu, you'll discover a Power icon that reveals a complete shutdown menu.

Populating the menu

Now that you have a good idea of some of the features in Start Menu Reviver, let's take a look at how you add items to the menu's tiles.

As I mentioned, the Apps flyout menu, which you can access at the click of a button or configure to automatically expand on hover, can show Desktop Apps, Modern Apps, or both. So, just click the Apps button and you can drag items from the menu over to the tile squares. As you can see in Figure C, I've replaced the majority of the default tiles with my own desktop apps. In fact, if you look closely, this image shows me placing Word in a tile using simple drag and drop.

Figure C

Pinning apps to the menu tiles is facilitated by the Apps flyout menu.

If you compare the examples shown in Figures A and C, you'll note that each big square can contain a single tile or four smaller ones. Once you have four tiles in a square, you can move them around to arrange them how you like. They will move around just like the tiles on the Start Screen. To remove app tile, just right click and select Reset tile.

As you will notice, the flyout menu in Figure C is showing Desktop Apps, but there is a drop down menu from which you can display Modern Apps as well as files and folders. While his makes it easy to pin shortcuts to the menu tiles you can also easily launch any application, access any folder or any file right from the flyout menus. Accessing folders and files from the flyout menus can be a real time saver, because you don't have to first launch File Explorer.

And speaking of files and folders, they too can be pinned to the menu's tiles with drag and drop. This comes in quite handy when you're consistently working with the files and a specific folder. You can also pin Web sites to menu tiles as well. Looking back at Figure C, you can see that I have a folder tile and a TechRepublic tile on the menu. To add a Web site, just right click a tile and select the Add tile command. You'll then see the Add tile dialog box, as shown in Figure D, and you can configure the link and the tile.

Figure D

In addition to apps and folders, you can pin Web sites to the new Start Menu.

If you want more tile space, the My Computer and Internet Explorer tiles can each become four smaller tiles and Start Screen/Dashboard can become eight smaller tiles.

Other features

While having a Start button and a menu full of tiles to launch apps is Start Menu Reviver's main function, there is a lot of peripheral functionality that you'll want to take advantage of. In Figure E, I've numbered the items which I'll describe in Table A. (In the screen shot, I've blurred the tiles to make it easier focus on the other items.)

Figure E

Beside the tiles, Start Menu Reviver has a lot of other functionality.

Table A

Item

Description

1 Clicking your account picture opens the User Accounts tool in the Control Panel.
2 The Settings button displays a menu that provides access to Start Menu Reviver's configuration settings as well as other operating system settings similar to those found on the WinX menu. While there are several duplicates such as Control Panel and Command Prompt, the rest are different. For instance, Action Center, Scheduled Tasks, and Windows Firewall, just to name a few, are found on the Settings menu.
3 The Network button opens the Control Panel's Network and Sharing Center.
4 Clicking Recent opens the flyout menu and displays the list of recently accessed items.
5 Search accesses the Modern UI Search Files panel just like pressing [Windows]+F.
6 Tasks opens the floating task switcher just like pressing [Alt]+[Tab].
7 The Run button provides quick access to the Run dialog box just like pressing [Windows]+R.
8 This button displays the Apps flyout I described earlier.
9 The Search box works just like the Start Search box in Windows 7's Start menu.
10 In addition to showing the current time, provides access to the Date and time dialog box.
11 Clicking the Power button reveals a shutdown menu with all the options you'd expect.
If you right click on Start Menu Reviver's Start button, you'll see a brief context menu, as shown in Figure F. From here you can Exit the program as I described earlier, launch Windows/File Explorer, or access the Taskbar Properties dialog box. Selecting Settings provides access to Start Menu Reviver's configuration settings.

Figure F

The brief context menu allows you to exit the program as well as launch Windows/File Explorer.

Configuring the Start Menu

Selecting the Settings command from the context menu or the Settings menu, will display the window shown in Figure G, where you can configure how Start Menu Reviver looks and works. I've already described many of the settings that you can configure here, such as changing the color scheme or changing the [Windows] Key, but there are other options you can configure. For example, you can disable the Dashboard tile, configure how the Apps/Expanded menu works, or reset all of the tiles and settings to their original state.

Figure G

You can configure all of Start Menu Reviver's options from Settings.

The commercial

One more thing - when it comes to software, I know the folks at ReviverSoft are consummate professionals, but I should point out that their marketing folks are really good too! Just take a look at the Start Menu Reviver commercial. Remind you of another company's commercials?

Start Menu Reviver (English) from ReviverSoft on Vimeo.

What's your take?

After reading this article, do you think that ReviverSoft's Start Menu Reviver is an interesting melding of the old and new Windows user interfaces? Have you used Start Menu Reviver? Do you think that it is worthy of my emphatic praise or do you think that in desperately seeking something exciting in Windows 8, I have gone off the deep end? Will you try Start Menu Reviver? (It is free, so what have you go to lose?) As always, if you have comments or information to share about this topic, please take a moment to drop by the TechRepublic Community Forums and let us hear from you.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

86 comments
mike
mike

Clicked on download, tried to save and it will not save.

bart
bart

You are the product indeed. As far as I can see it doesn't allow you to 'opt-out' from the 'collect and use personally identifiable information' bit. So My conclusion is that even if you change your mind and uninstall, they still own any information they could and can gather from you. And for this reason... you're fired. :-)

mbeare
mbeare

I don't know about Microsoft knocking on our door, but it would be nice :) Our boot to desktop could be a little smoother. Unfortunately we have not found a great reliable way to make this work with all languages without some sore of window opening in the process. Having this boot option in Windows 8.1 will get rid of this problem for us. We have had some great feedback from Techies and non Techies alike. Some people really like the ability to customize their menu and really make it unique to them and it's not hard to do with SMR.

ronstrong
ronstrong

I've been using startisback for around a month now. When I installed it I thought 'whew! thanks I've got my computer back'. If you want windows 7+windows 8 when you need it just get startisback it costs piffling amounts. If I were running an IT department still I'd be happy, we could get Win 8 PCs put it on and no one would grumble. Start Menu Reviver would not fit that criteria the 'ew, there's something new there- get it away!' user would moan and grumble. I'm going to try it for a day tomorrow. It's a nice UI but it reminds me of those desktop alternatives you got in windows 95 days. Good for the geeks but not for mainstream users. There's no point in learning a nw vernacular unless it's mainstream (or you're a geek). Yes it's pretty, yes it's good, but ...... we'll see Ron

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I can enter a text description, the Preview shows the text beneath the icon. When I save the tile, the description does not appear on the tile. The right side Expanded Menu appears every time I click the Reviver button. I've tried setting it for 'Manually expand' and collapsing it with the 'Apps' button on the lower left of the main window, but it reappears each time I click the Start button. The menu is useful when initially selecting tiles but I'd like it to stay hidden after that.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I get a 'Start Menu Reviver' window, assorted tutorial topics on the left, video pane on the right. When I click the icon to start the video, the video pane goes black. It doesn't matter if I view in full screen (as recommended) or not; I get nothing.

wnematollahi
wnematollahi

Windows 7 works well enough for those of us who have to use Windows. The only advantage I see for Windows 8 is better security. However, if security is a prime concern, use Mac, Linux, or some other hierarchical OS, and _don't_ use IE and ActiveX Controls. We may deploy Win8 in the next several months at my workplace, and most of us dread the prospect.

kmadison
kmadison

Still being unfamiliar with Win8 I hesitate to use this interface even though the author gives it a "thumbs up". I need to use the native WinOs interface so when I go to the other computers that do NOT use the Reviver in their Win8 OS I do not get frustrated. Plain and simple. Maybe after a year when I know how Win8 is suppose to "act" will I put this on my machine. If this app is as good as the author says, then I certainly hope Microsoft incorporates (buys) and updates the Win8 OS with it. However, until then, I need to learn that OS.

carlsf
carlsf

We will wait for Microsoft to fix the problem (return the Start button and menu) or we will no longer use Microsoft Windows 8 or the horrible Office 2013. Out Test bed of Windows 8 is using the Classic UI free as a download from "ninite.com" very nice.

perrya
perrya

i've been using classic start menu for years, as soon as i had to get work done on a windows server 2012 instead of playing with the interface, i installed it on there and haven't looked back

jrazor
jrazor

I suspect that so many (especially after the US gov't being outed on data mining) are concerned with their computers being hacked, watched, taken over, or just nagged to death. Perhaps if the Reviver web site talked up your business model too. How do you make money and how does the "free" products fit into that mode. You have both Start Menu & Battery Reviver as "free" products at this time. To most people who don't necessarily understand how giving something away helps you make money. Many have become so skeptical that they see bad guys behind every bush. Reviver has already been given some insight above as to peoples concerns about what "data" is being collected. So be as open as you possible can! And then go out and release some more great products please!

Bob G Beechey
Bob G Beechey

Using Windows 8 Start Screen and All App Screen with scroll wheel mouse is fast, fluid and intuitive. With a start screen organised for my personal use pattern, the Windows 8 system is so much faster and more sensible than the start menu. I have seen so many Windows XP/Vista/7 computers with a desktop totally covered with icons and a gargantuan start menu that I wonder how the users get any work done at all. I have yet to hear any sensible use case as to why anyone would need a start menu. From my experience, Win8 is most easy to use with mouse/keyboard, secondly with touch, poorly with trackpad. Have myself used Windows 1.0, 2.1, 3.0, 3.1, 3.11, 95, 98, XP, Vista, 7,8

adpetitt
adpetitt

thanks Greg I was not really looking for this sort of app/tool but I like it lots and I think I am going to enjoy using it.

logantech91
logantech91

All I have to say to the developers is THANK YOU!!!! I have tried several of the start menu apps and this is by far the best one. Again THANK YOU!

Slayer_
Slayer_

I'm all for new things, as long as they improve the experience.

abbos
abbos

Loool! But i dont like the Windows 8 look at all...:) No problem though.. i skip Win 8.

JJFitz
JJFitz

The application looks pretty impressive. I will give it a try. Thanks! I have one caution for IT Help Desk folks though. [b]Most likely, your clients will not have Reviver installed.[/b] Learning how to use Reviver or any other third party start menu substitute will not help you support Windows 8. You are still going to have to get used to working with a plain vanilla Windows 8 installation.

mbeare
mbeare

Hi Guys, My name is Mark Beare and I am one of the founders of ReviverSoft. Thank you for the great feedback here. We definitely tried really hard to make the best Start Menu replacement for Windows 8 that really feels like it is part of the OS rather than just transforming Windows 8 back into Windows 7. We felt this was a product that really needed to be made free because it really enhances Windows 8 and will hopefully encourage more people to use it. If we charged money for it people would be less likely to try it or recommend it to others. We are focused on continuing to make the product better so feedback is very welcome!

mbeare
mbeare

It is working for me now. Might have been an issue with the CDN.

mbeare
mbeare

Hi Bart, Your concern is shared by others for sure and there have been some others who have had similar comments. Below is a response I have to Steve when he mentioned the same thing. Happy to answer any other specific questions about PII. Mark Hey Steve, Great question! I want you to first understand the 'personal' information that we collect. The only thing that we collect is a unique ID number from your computer so that we can determine the amount of people who are using the product. This number is referred to by us as a UUID (Unique User ID). If you use a program like Fiddler you can actually see the communication with the server and see this information being passed. We are unable to identify who a person is from their UID. The only way that we can ever identify someone is if they purchase a product from us (because they need to fill in billing details at the time of purchase) or if you sign up for our newsletter. The UUID information is used by us to stagger product updates so that we do not push updates out to all users at once which would cause a large load on our update server. Using a UUID is a very common practice with software. Come other companies might use a device ID (this is easy to do with a phone or tablet where the internal hardware does not change) or a MAC address. We do not sell or supply this information to any other companies (and I don't think they would really find it useful anyway). I am definitely happy have a conversation about this if you have other concerns. Feel free to reply with any questions. Mark

clarabr
clarabr

@mbeare I am 81 years young.  I just downloaded your program and I intend to use it.  Thank you.  I went from Windows XP to Windows 8 right in the middle of doing invitations for our 60th wedding anniversary party.  I did finish them and we had a wonderful time.  I still have a lot of learning to do.  Clara

mbeare
mbeare

Thanks for your feedback Ron. This was definitely something that we were worried about bringing SMR to market looking and working like it does. We did not want to create another learning curve (as Windows 8 seems to already have enough of one for some people). We designed SMR to use a type of interface design that most people are familiar with and that is tiles. Any one with a Smart Phone or a Tablet these days are familiar with this UI design and usage. We are still very curious to hear what people think when they first use it as we are always trying to improve usability. We could have just designed a Windows 7 style Start Menu but then what is the point? You may as well just keep using Windows 7 :)

mbeare
mbeare

Text descriptions only show up when a tile is large. When it is a small tile there is not enough space for the text to show up so it does not show. The different options for the extended menu should work this way: Automatically Expands: It will expand if you click 'Apps' or if you move your cursor to the right hand edge of the menu. Manually Expands: Only opens if you click 'Apps' Always Shown: The extended menu is always displayed. If this is not working this way can you please try exiting the application (Right click on the Start Button and then select 'Exit') and then relaunch it again. Hopefully that will fix it. Are you running the program on Windows 8 or Windows 7?

mbeare
mbeare

HI, I have just tested this now and it works for me. These are embedded Vimeo videos so if Vimeo is having issues they will not work but Vimeo is typically very reliable. Are you still having problems with them?

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Just in your saying 'most of us dread the prospect', you are destined to hate Win8. Why not spend some time in the interim, browsing MS and other PRO Win8 forums to learn tips, tricks and advantages that other Win8 users find? If you browse forums looking for opinions, you will read a mix of mainly unqualified opinions, based on what people read from other unqualified opinions, or else find everyone hates a specific feature so much it will cloud your own judgement. If you spend more time focused on learning benefits, you will appreciate them and find the benefits yourself, when the time comes you will embrace Win8 without dreading it. Just saying.

mbeare
mbeare

Thanks for the feedback. It is a bit sad that these days you need to be more descriptive when something is completely free than when it is a paid product :) We will try our best to be more up front with why the product is free. Thank you for the feedback!

mbeare
mbeare

We really hope you like the program and please let us know if you have any feedback!

Greg Shultz
Greg Shultz

...of words or your comment title - "get stuck." I take it that indicates that you have not yet voluntarily attempted to investigate the Windows 8 experience on one of your own systems for any length of time?? ;-)

Steve Auerbach
Steve Auerbach

Is there a pay version where my personal info is not sent back to your company? As noted, if product is "free" then I am the "product" with your company's business model being to resell what you get off my computer. I'd rather pay you money and not have your product snooping around behind the scenes.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I love the avatars on y'all's 'About the company' page. Welcome to TR. Now, how much is this application if I want to install it on a single business system?

ronstrong
ronstrong

Well it's still on there, it did take some time to boot this morning - a lot of blank screen waits.I don't like that it doesn't goaway when you click out of it - that should be a choice. But I haven't noticed anything missing yet and the tiles is a nice idea and has helped me tidy my desktop (how many shortcuts to outlook do you need!). I would just not introduce it to a non-geeek audience. I think MS have to do that work and they should just make you an offer you can't refuse (the nice type with lots of zeros).

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

That explains the 'missing' descriptions. I have dual monitors, with my taskbar VERTICAL on the LEFT SIDE of the RIGHT-HAND MONITOR (essentially down the middle). When I click the Start button, the SMR menu appear on the RIGHT SIDE of the LEFT-HAND MONITOR. (This surprised me; I assume for others it appears over or to the immediate right of the button?) The extended menu appears regardless of setting. I suspect my combination of monitor and task bar position is responsible.

Slayer_
Slayer_

But 7 already has a start menu....?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm unfamiliar with Vimeo, but I can't view the videos directly from their site either. I tried IE and Pale Moon (a Firefox variant) but both were unsuccessful. I can't view any other videos from there either, so I can only conclude it's my system.

mbeare
mbeare

I tend to agree with what you are saying. Windows 8 is very different but if you take the time to learn it you can adapt and even improve your efficiency. The learning curve is just a bit harder than past versions of Windows. We mad Start Menu Reviver to not cut off these great new features of Windows 8 (and instead compliment them) and help with the learning curve.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Since that's about how I feel about it after six weeks. :-( I recall you and I discussing the use of the word 'embrace' :D

Slayer_
Slayer_

Gave it about 2 hours on a test machine. Just long enough to verify our software worked on Windows 8 (it didn't, they appear to have moved where the desktop and start menu are in the c:\users folder [if that folder is even there, I didn't look]) I also used it on a VM, and was immediately frustrated with the hot spots, as they don't work well in VM's if your mouse isn't captured. So my only real observations were: Control panel items duplicated, but they don't work the same. Search is more confusing now because its broken into categories. Works fine for launching regular programs but control panel items are a bit more difficult now, especially if you have to figure out which to open as one is the metro version and one is the windows version, but the results don't indicate which is which. Also, the hot spots are ridiculously counter intuitive. I didn't even know the charms bar "options" changed depending on what program you had open. Nor did I know how to actually close a program until someone mentioned it on TR.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Gotta love the paranoid "your company's business model being to resell what you get off my computer" You need to learn a bit more about law, marketing and what is collected form MOST company websites.

mbeare
mbeare

Hey Steve, Great question! I want you to first understand the 'personal' information that we collect. The only thing that we collect is a unique ID number from your computer so that we can determine the amount of people who are using the product. This number is referred to by us as a UUID (Unique User ID). If you use a program like Fiddler you can actually see the communication with the server and see this information being passed. We are unable to identify who a person is from their UID. The only way that we can ever identify someone is if they purchase a product from us (because they need to fill in billing details at the time of purchase) or if you sign up for our newsletter. The UUID information is used by us to stagger product updates so that we do not push updates out to all users at once which would cause a large load on our update server. Using a UUID is a very common practice with software. Come other companies might use a device ID (this is easy to do with a phone or tablet where the internal hardware does not change) or a MAC address. We do not sell or supply this information to any other companies (and I don't think they would really find it useful anyway). I am definitely happy have a conversation about this if you have other concerns. Feel free to reply with any questions. Mark

mbeare
mbeare

Thanks for the comments. As for pricing, we actually have not even developed pricing for businesses yet. We are really just happy for people to use it for free. We would definitely need to discuss pricing with any large corporation who were looking to roll it out and who expect a certain level of support as the version we currently offer does not include any support.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

We have an about the company page? :) Not sure I have ever seen it.

mbeare
mbeare

I got it. Thanks!

mbeare
mbeare

Start Menu Reviver can be used in commercial instances. There is only a cost if support is required with the product.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Still looks free for private use. Which I guess means I'm being bad using it at work. Well we have been under a spending freeze for a year now. So I don't think I can get them to buy this for me :( . I guess I should probably stop using it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

But the last time I went looking for it, it was no longer freeware. I'm using VirtuaWin instead, but it has all the features I was using in Dexpot.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I have 3 monitors. Centre is portrait, sides are landscape. Centre is widescreen, sides are typical 5:4. I keep my taskbar on the left side of the right monitor so it can fit more items in the list. That plus dexpot means I have a hell of a lot of stuff open all the time :)

mbeare
mbeare

Do you mind sending me a screenshot? markATreviversoftDOTcom

mbeare
mbeare

Let us know what you think!

Slayer_
Slayer_

I got a few VM's kicking around, I might try this.

mbeare
mbeare

Yes Windows 7 has a Start Menu. Start Menu Reviver replaces it for those people who prefer to have a more personalized Start Menu. Start Menu Reviver can also be easily disabled if you prefer to go back to using the normal Start Menu.

Greg Shultz
Greg Shultz

...use the word 'embrace' in talking about getting used to Windows 8. However, it began to feel like a one sided relationship... I was the only one doing the embracing and Windows 8 was fighting me every step of the way... ;-)

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Internet paranoia is rampant these days, while I do agree there are plenty of malicious sites and plenty of people TRYING to get your personal info, more personal can be gathered from your trash each week. I've known a few security engineers that had no PHYSICAL security in how they conduct their day to day, but come the internet they were as anonymous as can be. MOST companies don't track and sell your info, MOST companies won't collect personal info, nor are allowed to by law, even if you are in the US where there are no privacy laws to speak of anymore. ANYTHING and ANYONE can be tracked though believe me, I track everything from airplanes to people's children, that is my business, though not without permission. As far as teh vast majority of business focuse dapps and start up companies, only the most rudimentary info is collected, nothing verifying your name, address, personal info etc. The most common web track is just for IP origin and the next page you clicked to when leaving. I've used cookies and license agreements for developing marketing campaigns for years, it's not the covert industry many feel it is. Those companies do exist, they are our there, but far fewer and far between these days. I'm sure that if I was to follow you around for a day, I could collect more personal info on you than anyone online could in months of tracking.

eaglewolf
eaglewolf

Thanks for explaining the PII, Mark. Being one of the mildly paranoid, I really appreciate it and wish more would be as responsive as you've been. Yes, I think trust is a good option here. :)

mbeare
mbeare

Thanks for the additional question. You are right, we could probably write a better explanation in the license terms. These license terms are usually written by lawyers who like to keep thing vague for the most protection. I will go back and see if we can review it further. As for the data mining, I personally have no interest in doing this(even after you have educated me so well on it :) ). Our unique identifier is a proprietary algorithm so we cannot run it against any other data sources to obtain additional information. I guess it is up to you to determine if you trust what I say or not. Happy to provide you with my details if that helps and we can talk further.

Ron_007
Ron_007

If that really is "all" the personal information you collect, why don't you include the explanation in the license terms. That way you make a clear upfront statement of what information you collect and alleviate the personal information concerns of the reasonably paranoid that your current policy statement creates. The thing is, since that is a unique identifier, with very little data mining it could be the key to personally identifying the user. Using de-annonimization techniques to connect data from various sources requires surprisingly little unique information to explicitly identify a person as this article demonstrates: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~shmat/shmat_oak08netflix.pdf/

mbeare
mbeare

As long as you tell me what you think of it!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If there are no objections and since you don't have a pricing model yet, I'm going to violate section 1.4.H of the licensing agreement and install it on a single system (mine) where I work. We have no plans to deploy W8 outside IT testing, but I will make a point to contact y'all should we do so. Thanks for your response.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Geez, too many Marks around this joint. We need an aerial spraying program. :D

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