Microsoft

Top 11 Reasons IT won't run Windows on MACS


(excerpt from www.nwc.com 5.25.2006 -Andrew Conry-Murray and Tom Lasusa)

  1. OS X might infect Windows XP with usable features
  2. Who needs nuts when we have fruits?
  3. All those antivirus software licenses would go to waste
  4. If all computers ran like Macs, IT would be out of work
  5. They haven't perfected the Apple users's look of smug self-satisfaction
  6. The thought of Gates and Jobs "in bed together" gives them the willies
  7. If it ain't broke, don't Microsoft it
  8. You can't right-click with a one-button mouse
  9. The IT staff thinks Boot Camp means having to jog and do pushups
  10. They'd miss the late nights and free pizza on Patch Tuesdays
  11. The "Blue Screen of Death" hasn't been ported over yet
48 comments
vedoham
vedoham

Whenever I see Windows v Mac comments, I always laugh at the near-religious views and reactions of all sides and at the ignorance of many commentators, especially the Windows ones who talk condescendingly of Macs. I have worked in support since the days of DOS for Microsoft, System 6 for Apple, Solaris 2.5 for Sun, and Red Hat 6 for Linux - and I have lived through the various iterations of these OSs since then. I am now happily using and supporting Windows 2k/2k3, OS X, Solaris 7-10, and RHEL 3-4, and do not have much of a bias one way or the other. Macs have ALWAYS been easier to install and manage than PCs. I am always amazed at people who post that Macs cannot be managed remotely/globally in the same way that PCs can. Both pre- and post-OSX Macs can be managed remotely, be locked down, and have roaming profiles more cheaply and more easily than PCs with Active Directory and SMS. Both pre- and post-OSX Macs can be set up as file and/or web servers, again more cheaply and easily as PCs. The lack of Mac aplications is a myth. The great majority of office users work mostly with Office, Outlook, and Internet Explorer, which all exist either as MS applications or as equivalent applications on a Mac. A few years ago, the accounting, marketing, and sales departments of a company would probably have been hard put to use Macs (four years ago a company where I was contracting rolled out a purchase order and confirmation system that was only accessible through IE 6; I had to buy and set up a Citrix server in three days for the twenty-odd OS 9 users who had to have access to that system; although I was grateful that it gave me the opportunity to learn about Citrix, I could not believe that the developer and project manager managed to shift the blame to the Mac users! LOL) but these days so much is done through the browser that the possible lack of Mac versions of an application for those departments' work (or any other) is not an issue - although I am not sure that Bloomberg/Reuters can run on OS X. For the few for whom it might be, there is always Bootcamp/Parallels/Fusion or even Citrix. I have worked at a hedge fund that has been using Macs since System 7, a private equity fund that uses OS X and RHEL, and a private equity fund where one of the partners is using OS X when everyone else is on 2k and the servers are 2k3 with Exchangbe and sharepoint. SO using Macs exclusively or in conjunctions with other OSs can be done. I am not advocating that everyone switch to OS X Or that IT departments give users a choice of OS - who wants to support more than one desktop platform? Having a mixed 98/NT/2k environment in 2000/2002 was bad enough so supporting Windows and OS X would be a pain. You might want to have different desktop teams for each because most support techs do not have the ambition or work ethic to keep their skills up to date and in depth for both platforms. I am simply venting my frustration at ignorant comments about the lack of this and that in the Mac world. To go back to the article's actual content, I would simply say that it is a good (but cheeky) list that is almost certainly written to piss off the Windows fanatics. OS X is definitely a better operating system than XP/Vista, although there are Microsoft features that I wish the Apple developers would copy (like being able to delete/rename files from within an open or save dialogue box). For my personal use, I would switch over to a Mac laptop with XP/Vista and Fedora also installed (and keep my Solaris and Linux desktop boxes) if Apple added a right-click button... I could get used to ctrl-clicking in OS X but I do not think that Windows or Linux have an equivalent (pain-in-the-****) command for me to rush out to buy a Macbook Pro.

atroon
atroon

My wife bought a Mac and I was surprised to find out that at least in the latest generation of the Mighty Mouse, you can right click by pressing on the right side of the housing. There's no separate button, and if you press both sides down it's a standard click, but boy, has that made Mac usage a lot easier.

iainwrig
iainwrig

Automatically updates 100 machines for me every tuesday. While i drink beer at the bar on Tuesday nights!

johnlutes
johnlutes

A loyal and enthusiastic Mac user from 1989 until iTunes. Wife has MacBook, uses both environments and loves the experience. When Apple began gouging [4[Informal] an act of overcharging or cheating of money; extortion or swindle] the public with iTunes (the no value added money collector)I sold my Mac, my Apple stock, gave the awful ipod to my wife, and never looked back. You know? after 12 plus years of "Apple enthusiasm", I just don't miss any of it.

roctanberg
roctanberg

Tired of wrestling with the old gray matter. fedup with having to think for yourself. Like having to pay twice as much for parts and labor. Then get a MAC I have one, I use it to think for those who have forgotten how.

dutchrai
dutchrai

As an IT'er who uses both PC and Mac in client and server roles, I have no doubt that the Mac is a 'better' OS (and runs on better hardware too). Mac OS X is definitely 'better' when you simply look at the technical aspects of it. It has no virusses, few security issues, simply feels more solid...etc. It's feature packed. And personally, I prefer the Mac as well. Yes, it's 'Better'. However, the usual problem remains for most departments in a company: there are very few business applications for the Mac. Our company has a few Macs though, even a slim'n cool XServe in File Server mode running Apple Remote Desktop too (great stuff) and an old G4 as an reliable FTP server. Our graphical departments of course use Mac's too. But for the rest, it's all PC's. Troubled PC's. Needing patches...frequently. Viruses...yes...almost daily somewhere. SOD...(yes, the dreaded Screen Of Death)...it happens once in a while. But in the end we have no choice, our business needs the apps running on it. It's a sad world, but you really don't blame IT for putting PC's all over the place. Instead, simply remember that it's the rest of the company that dictates the requirements in the first place. It's IT's role to support these requirements.

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