Windows

Using Windows 2000 Server as a router

Routing is a process that forwards packets from one network to another. Admins may use hardware routers that are highly optimized, but often these routers are too expensive for smaller networks. Fortunately, Windows 2000 Server includes and provides an easy way to configure the router.

Routing, which is included in Windows 2000 Server, is a process that forwards packets from one network to another. I usually use hardware routers that are highly optimized, but sometimes these routers are too expensive for smaller networks.

Windows 2000 Server provides an easy way to configure the router. All you need are two network interfaces that are connected to separate networks. To configure the whole thing, you'll use a wizard that's part of the Routing And Remote Access service.

  1. On the Start menu, select Programs | Administrative Tools and then click Routing And Remote Access.
  2. Right-click the server listed in the left part of the MMC console and select Configure And Enable Routing And Remote Access. When the wizard appears, click Next.
  3. Select the Network Router and click Next.
  4. Verify that the TCP\IP is listed and click Next.
  5. Select No and click Next.
  6. Click Finish.

You've just configured your Windows 2000 computer as an IP router. If you want to undo this routing, simply right-click the server from the list in the MMC console and click Properties; on the General tab, disable the Router check box.

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1 comments
pweber
pweber

What does this look like?