Windows 8

Windows 8 Consumer Preview embraces the KISS principle

The Windows 8 Consumer Preview released February 29, 2012, is the new poster child for the keep-it-simple-stupid philosophy.

On February 29, 2012, Microsoft made the Windows 8 Consumer Preview available to everyone as a free download. Of course, I downloaded and installed it to a PC right away to see what all the fuss was about.

For an even closer look at the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, check out the accompanying TechRepublic Photo Gallery.

Keep it simple

I haven't had time to do a full evaluation of the Consumer Preview, but my first impression of this version of Windows 8 on a desktop PC is one of pleasant surprise. I am surprised because I find myself liking the Metro Interface. The tiles are simple, clean, and straightforward. In fact, some may say they are actually intuitive. Moving between applications is very nimble, and as far as I can tell all the applications work as advertised. You can get more of my initial reactions in the photo gallery.

For the multitude of TechRepublic members who were predicting doom and gloom for Microsoft and Windows 8, I suggest you download the Consumer Preview and give it a thorough try. It may change your mind. And even if you don't like the Metro Interface, you may find the more traditional desktop just as functional as the desktop in Windows 7 or XP. There is just no catastrophe to see here.

As time passes, I'll see if my initial reaction holds sway, but as of right now I think Windows 8 is going to win some users over with its keep-it-simple-stupid (KISS) philosophy. For me the real test is whether Windows 8 can run the games I typically play on the PC. I'll get back to you on that. (On a side note, I am installing Windows 8 on a tablet as I write this blog post.)

Have you downloaded and installed the Windows 8 Consumer Preview? What are your initial impressions of this latest version of Windows? Can you live with the Metro Interface? Have your experienced any problems?

Also read:

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

47 comments
Mooreman
Mooreman

I installed the ISO version on a new 640 GB hard drive. After installing I couldn't open any of the Metro Apps except the desktop. After a lot of Google searching I found that you can't open them from Administrator mode. I don't recall ever being offered to create a standard user account during the installation. So after creating a standard user account, most of the Metro Apps started working okay. The Metro picture viewer App freezes and crashes. The Weather app also seems to be broken. One of the first things I did was to create both a shutdown and a reboot shortcut icon using the shutdown.exe command in the 64-bit system folder. Now I don't have to jump thru hoops just to shut Win8 down. I don't care for File Managers (Explorer) that lack sight lines, and they can take that ribbon bar and shove it, so I installed the free Explorer++, it runs great on Win8. Problem solved. Give it a try. I can hardly wait to see the start menu and start orb return in Windows 9, because I sure won't be trading in Windows 7 anytime soon for this piece of c**p. I can see the blow back from Win8 being worse than what happened with Vista, yes its that bad!

donaldgagnon1
donaldgagnon1

I was about to download it and see what all the fuss is about, but as I read further down the download page, it warned that, once you download it, you can't go back to your earlier OS unless you have a recovery disk, the actual OS disk or have it backed-up on a partition. That's way more aggravation than I need and am willing to give myself. Judging from most of the other comments, it doesn't sound like something I 'desperately' need to have anyway.

120529-000107
120529-000107

There are two disturbing elements that are beginning to emerge in the conversations among IT pros. One, the possibility that Microsoft is moving to a closed ecosystem on their "app platform" and will demand a royalty to access. And two, the idea that there is a hidden kill switch that can disable the operating system or particular applications. A massive security vulnerability in mission critical systems should hackers be able to access that capability. After using the preview, I find that it does not enhance my work environment and seems aimed directly at the consumer market that is interested in seamless multi-device support.

geoffreymeyer
geoffreymeyer

Does anyone know if there is a registry fix so I can just log in to the old desktop? The metro interface feels like a barrier to get to where I want to go. It seems more like an "app" that I could plop on top of the desktop if I wanted, not the other way around. I will play with it and I am sure I will get used to it, but unless there is some other strong technical or security reason, I don't see business flocking to this OS. Revisiting Vista?

PeterM42
PeterM42

The Metro interface is a bit odd, but obviously needs getting used to, Underneath the Metro front-end, it is much the same as the other versions of NT 6 - Vista (NT v6.0) and "Windows7" (NT v6.1), but as it is actually NT v6.2 that is hardly surprising. Windows Explorer has adopted the Ribbon interface, so that takes a bit of getting used to as well. Most things are good old solid NT. I can see the point of Metro for touch tablets and smartphones, but DEFINITELY NOT for normal desktops - waste of screen space. Some of the Metro stuff should be hidden a bit deeper under "Control Panel" type functions, but then I guess there is a desparation by MS to find something to put up front as "Apps".

ruirego
ruirego

Boot Press F8 Enter Recovery Mode -> Select Advanced Options ->Troubleshot->Advanced Options->Windows Startup Settings->Restart What the f#"$"%!!!

Gremeleon
Gremeleon

Just installed, on VMWare 8 virtual space (why did Tech Republic say it would run on Win7 XP Mode (same issue as Developer release: HAL failed to initialise). Not seeing a running app on a task bar doesn't make for easy switching between apps. How do we switch to another app??

anoel_co
anoel_co

I have a feeling that one thing Microsoft is trying to do is to wipe out all third party software that has been so useful and helpful so we will all have to go back to the basic MS applications being forced upon us. What good is a touch-based interface on a desktop or a laptop? USE-LESS!

JavaJobber
JavaJobber

I know this is only a preview, but KISS in this case stands for "Keep it strangely schizophrenic." I find it hard to believe Microsoft will let the final bits of Windows 8 out the door without making it simple for non-tablet users to boot directly into a "Windows 7 lookalike mode" with a Start Menu. If that's where a user chooses to spend their time, they won't be visiting the Metro app store anyway!

ruirego
ruirego

Interesting is how can someone ignore so many bad comments! I'm an IT Pro and a developer and, since the launch of developer preview, said that MS was on wrong way! Just my opinion... ignore it!

mbradley9645
mbradley9645

I guess IT pros and developers are so tired of reading the negative comments by the uninformed, they have stopped reading comments period. Who cares about your opinion? No one. What will matter is sales. Microsoft isn't exactly a moron. Predictions of immediate death are premature by the immature.

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

Did Microsoft make it smaller? No Did Microsoft make it faster? No Did Microsoft make it more secure? No Did they make it cheaper? No All they did was diddle the GUI, add a few tricks and change the logo. Oh, and Microsoft is suffering from the same disease as the Military: one tool for all uses, can't be done. You can't get there from here with the GUI or anything else related to people. That type of thinking when out with the twentieth century manufacturing. People want personalized items. That's one of the things I like about Linux, you can switch and swap to your heart's content. Don't like the GUI you can pick from half a dozen or so. Want a screensaver plug in one. Want a new log on screen pick one. Don't like logos, change them. When will Windows users wise up?

Slayer_
Slayer_

DOS was more intuitive. Windows 8 needs another 5 years of development before it will be ready, damn thing doesn't even tell you to right click in metro to access your programs, or that you have to hover over the right of your screen to access anything. Or how about when the advanced options errors, the error is stuck open, or how about you now have two task bars, metro tasks and normal tasks, or how about new IE which is the ugliest thing I have ever seen, or the fact that metro apps seem to randomly "roll" away and minimize. Or the fact that they don't even give you an easy way to access your files (unless you turn on your desktop icons). The only way I have found so far is to use the run dialog which still pops up when you hold the windows key and press R. How do you even access your documents folder? This should be painfully obvious but I can't find it... There are so many problems its crazy. The metro task bar that activates at the top left, but doesn't let you use it until you keep your mouse on the edge, and move down tot he middle, then the bar turns completely black and you can now interact with it. Even the new IE makes no sense, you have to right click on the border of your screen for anything useful to pop up? And it still keeps randomly rolling away on me, maybe I'll figure out why. What is the purpose of that thing at the top that lets you grab the desktop or metro app, whats the point of that?

dhjohns
dhjohns

I installed it as a dual boot alongside Windows 7. All my drives are still accessible, and I haven't had any installation problems with other programs. Most programs seem to run quicker. It is very nice. I am using a home-built computer with a dual core Athlon 3800+, 4 gigs of ram, and an NVidia 512 meg PCIexpress, video card. I installed Windows 8 64 bit. All my drivers installed either easier, or more automatically than Windows 7.

cedric.tanga
cedric.tanga

Has Microsoft come down from their Cloud and taken bucket loads of the infamous 'intuitive' pill cause if they stick with the WIN8 GUI the movement between PC, Tablet and phone will truely be seemless!

mjc5
mjc5

I downloaded the iso after not being able to download the web version. I installed it, went through the instructions, even checked their little how do I decide links. Checked the safest ones - some of htem told me I'd have to reinstall my programs if I used that option. I sure didn't want that. It set up and connected to the internet. So far so good. After messing with it for awhile, I decided I'd seen enough. So I looked around for how to uninstall it. No joy there. I went to Microsoft. Had a quick look around, and found out that you can't uninstall it, you have to reinstall your old system software and all your programs. It's crazy, they break all the installed programs by moving them into an old programs folder. If it kills them, why not just erase them because you're never going to use them again. Dealing with Microsoft is like Lucy and Charlie Brown, and the football. It's always "This time it'll be great" But you always pull the football away, Lucy!" "No I won't, I promise, come on and try it" So you do, and she pulls away the football at the last moment, and you fall down. By the way, the interface and OS is pathetic. The only thing I liked was the little goldfish.

vancevep
vancevep

This reminds me of Gnome 3 all over again! Gnome's decision to switch from Gnome 2.x to Gnome 3 has set the Linux community in an uproar... even nearly a year later! Sure, some have embraced Gnome 3/Unity, but there is still a HUGE base of Linux users who have switched to xfce or kde (or even lxde). Others just simply refuse to upgrade their distro at all so they can stay on Gnome 2.x. (I'll give Canonical some slack though as they were sorta forced into creating Unity due to Gnome forcing version 3 upon us.) I am a Linux fan and I currently use Ubuntu 11.10 with Unity. However, due to classes at school, I have started to grow some love for Windows 7 (however, I wish W7 was a responsive as Linux). I can see W8 taking a LONG time to win (more like convert) Windows users to the new Metro way. Just look at the slow/lack of adoption of Metro on smartphones. If Microsoft isn't careful, Windows could turn into a niche OS like Linux. At least Linux has MANY options based on the most recent kernel.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

Emphasis on the "Stupid" part.

jeff
jeff

First, I have to admit that I haven't used Win 8 (and don't care to). I have a Mac Lion Server with a Trackpad instead of a mouse. It works great! But I'm primarily a Windows users so I bought a Microsoft Trackpad for Windows. It sucked! The gestures were unnatural, limited, non-intuitive and plain old crappy! It was hard to use and my fingers didn't slide on it like on the Mac. Windows now reminds me of IBM OS/2. A great idea on paper, but a real flop. Microsoft can't even catch up with Apple. But since Apple doesn't have all the apps I need, there is no real winner in the computer world. Microsoft can't make an operating system and Apple doesn't have the apps. I think computers are in the awkward teenage years where nothing seems right and the future seems dim. I just hope that we get past this soon. My life would be better if I didn't spend 1/2 of it keeping my computers working and worrying about what tomorrow will bring.

svpaladin
svpaladin

Obviously, this isn't techie-oriented. I think the last, true "techie" interface from MS was DOS 6.2, without the shell... However, I see where they're going with this. Windows phones, this interface is already on the X-Box (from a semi-techie interface that I appreciated more than this), and now PC. Definitely taking a page from the Apple book of one look across all platforms (Ipod, Iphone, Ipad, Imac, etc.). At the end of the day, end users tend to prefer one interface across all their toys...

mjc5
mjc5

But as with all things Microsoft, first, there's no success with the regular download. Two different sites, but something not working. So I'm trying the .iso download now. I suspect the same old same old. With an ugly new Commodore 64'ish interface. And promises.

abbos
abbos

Ugly and not practical interface. I, and many of my friends, use our laptop and pc as administration and accounting machine. We do our administration, accounting and work on it. Using it for email and internet and online shopping. Next to that to do some games also. And most of the time we have a lot of windows open. Switching from one to the other. We dont want our desktok taken up by these ugly icons. If it was for a tablet they wouldnt care. But not for regular "home" use. None of them would use this Metro interface. They would switch back to the old desktop interface and arrange it to their needs. None of them is waiting to switch to 8 and luckely for them all just, or recently, bought a new laptop with W7 which they play to keep for a long time. I gave W8 a try and let them have a look at it. And all reacted the same... ugly, not practical and not tempted to try. I dislike this W8 so much i even installed Linux Ubuntu in dual-boot to get used to Linux. Because when MS develops like this then my future lies in Linux.

dburrows
dburrows

Mark, when you mentioned that you were installing 8 on a tablet, is that an Intel-based slate, or an ARM device? If it is ARM, where did you get the installer from?

jfuller05
jfuller05

will get back to you later. I downloaded the developer's preview and enjoyed using windows 8.

sysop-dr
sysop-dr

OK we have a Windows version that doesn't have Windows and a Windows server that has no GUI. Yes you can get the old desktop back to run applications in Windows, or even put metro on one display and the old desktop on the other, but the reality is that all of the new "apps" in the app store that most people will use will run in Metro which doesn't do windows, they are full screen. And Windows Server 8 does have a GUI but core doesn't. And all the signs from Microsoft are that future versions won't have the GUI at all, just PowerShell. Um, a Microsoft OS without a GUI wouldn't be called Windows would it, I mean isn't it just Dos? (with file shareing?) So there you have it, A desktop Window-less Windows and a server GUI-less dos. Is it 1985 all over again?

SquelchQuelch
SquelchQuelch

Simple and slick? These are adjectives I hardly need in an operating system that is, what, almost 30 years old? I don't need simple I need functional. I don't need slick I need reliable, stable and fast. Why doesn't Microsoft spend their millions (if not billions) on doing something like, oh I don't know, instant boot? Those tiles are absolutely useless to users who don't give a rat's patute about social networking. I'm not going to just boot up the OS and sit and stare at the tiles to see who's talking and what email I might be getting, or how much the temperature is changing from minute to minute. And my God!, what a colossal waste of space Metro is! I have rarely maximized any window in any version of Windows over the years. The last thing I want is to not have the choice anymore. And the way to get to the Start screen? Put your mouse over the bottom left corner of the screen! How un-intuitive is that? And most of these apps don't even have a close button. You have to put your mouse over the top left corner of the screen. Simply ridiculous. And you know what is even more ridiculous? Shutting down! If you're on the desktop, you have to mouse over the bottom left corner to get to the stupid Start screen. (Oh, and make sure that once the little icon appears that you don't mouse over it too far or it'll just disappear.) Then you have to drag the Start screen up to reveal the login screen where you can finally click the shut down icon. But then of course, you have to confirm that you want to shut down. Inane! In the first 15 minutes of use my right arm got tired because of all the back and forth between my keyboard and my mouse. I'm with @spawnywhippet, as soon as the OS is up and running I'm at the desktop until it's time to shutdown for the day.

Per4mer001
Per4mer001

I wouldn't want metro on my cell phone and I darn sure don't want it on my desktop. I think that Microsoft has really forgotten what excites users and IT professionals. Here's what would excite me; 1. Reliable, Stable and Fast- A larger footprint on the hard drive doesn't necessarily prove worth, how about streamlined code instead of just throwing more frosting on the cake. 2. It would also be nice if it could copy and move files on a network faster than a decade old operating system like XP. 3. Any OS that requires 2 clicks on the left and 2 clicks on the right to shutdown or restart makes me feel like a circus monkey - I don't like feeling like a circus monkey. I'm sure that some will find comfort in the lumbering along of bloated OS with a bland interface. I'm not one of those people.

SerrJ215
SerrJ215

Tired loading it in the VM system that comes with Windows 7 ult. Didn't work. After some digging I found that I would either have to use Hyper V or Virtual box (isn't it a little weird that it doesn't run on MS's own desktop VM tech?) I found that everything that was preinstalled was depended to an MS login. Which means that without the internet this OS is fairly useless. (yea I know the internet is a big part of what a computer is used for but still) I couldn't find a simple text editor. I couldn't figure out how to get to a simple "run" command, I had to use the explorer window to find the control panel. To put it simply this interface was not designed to get any actual work done. On a tablet to watch YouTube videos it might work but It pretty much renders a work desktop useless. I know there is a call to make computers simpler, but this trades simplicity for utility. I think most of us are going to be putting a cobra clutch on Windows 7 like we did with XP. We are going to need to to get MS to take this "cluster" and turn it into something useful. This would not be so bad if the Metro interface was something that was an optional feature. Something that we can turn on and off and have a setup similar to windows 7. Let the metro interface be for just the people who want to use it. By the way just discovered that instead of dropdowns everything is a ribbon now, like they have in MS office. They take one of the worst features they have in their office suite, the one I keep getting asked to turn off, and they push it to the entire OS.

zefficace
zefficace

Just like for Unity & gnome3, that's what I asked: What do I gain from this change? Nevermind that I like it or not, just tell me what exactly will this GUI change will really make better for me. After many months of gnome3 usage on my laptop, I have yet to find that advantage and am switching back to XFCE. I like XFCE, and don't really lose anything I would want from Gnome. When it comes to Metro, I have tried it, and have yet to find any "real" advantage. I have not done anything much quicker, and things weren't easier to find, nothing seemed more intuitive, etc. So this seems to change for the sake of change. What MS might want to do relative to the mobile platform is a big nevermind to me. It still feels like change for change's sake. I certainly could adapt to Metro, there's no doubt about that. I could even grow to actually like it per se, but I don't think I would gain anything. So I'll stick with Win7 untill the end of support, and by then maybe I'll find something attractive to lastest Windows available at that time. I will absolutly skip win8.

pbug56
pbug56

Well, not only did Microsoft not listen to our complaints about not using a stupidphone interface for a PC OS, they went and eliminated the usability of registry tweaks that let us put back the start orb, etc. And they still have done away with little things like LOGOFF! They've perpetuated the stupidest GUI I've seen in 40 years of computer usage and development even while finally getting some other things right. Taskmanager is very nice, for instance, at least at first view. And boot time and shutdown time are very good. But this GUI is for the birds - dodo birds. If I want to play hide and go seek - I wouldn't choose hiding the log in screen behind a liftable curtain. And if I want to play blocks, it wouldn't be to pick generic computer uses. No, I like my gadgets, icons, quick launch bar (which actually can still be setup just fine), and the whole start ORB menu system. Not being able to directly find such things as logoff or Control Panel is beyond stupid. My monitor is not a 2 inch wide touch screen; it is the same normal monitor type and size I've used for years with keyboard and mouse.

ruirego
ruirego

It seems that MS return to kindergarten! Maybe usefull for touch systems but a step backwards for desktop. Too stupid to call it a KISS...

ng128
ng128

I've installed it and I'm curious, intrigued even to find out how it handless. Used for some time yesterday evening, loved how fast the install was and how much info you got on al sorts of settings. Then I came to the metro interface, ok where is everything. How do I get to my classic configuration screen? Where are my documents? But eventually you do begin to find what you're looking for. Even though it is a huge change from previous versions. And I think that that's going to be a problem for a lot of people. When I think about the customers I have to help with their computers, I'm convinced that they will just go screaming for the hills when they see this. They will not find anything and that's always a problem. These are people that freak out when the icon of their antivirus changes because it's a new one. So I don't know. I'll continue to use windows 8, but I think it's not really going to work.

syhprum
syhprum

I tried to load it in the same way as I would do a windows 7 load i.e I decoded the the ISO with WinRar then copied it onto a loadable USB device. All went well at first then it demanded a serial number which brought everything to a halt. The serial number can be found by following the non ISO method of loading that suggest.

120529-000107
120529-000107

I do not understand the point of Windows 8. I can understand the sales pitch for increased security. But I cannot understand a tablet-touch paradigm on a vertical monitor. I am creative and require fast data entry and precision pointing. I am not into finger-painting nor am I into drag-and-drop interconnectedness and messaging between applications. I am still struggling with cloud security and availability issues where vendors use unilateral contracts and you have the right to complain and get you last month's fee rebated for a catastrophic loss of your work. So I would appreciate some advice as to why I would abandon a functional desktop with icons for a display of large message-enabled mini-windows? Is this a superior revolutionary operating system or an evolutionary operating system designed to put a touch-interface on an oldie-but-goodie and call it a win-mac? HELP. I do not understand.

Skruis
Skruis

Though the changes that Microsoft made will not satisfy the hardest core anti-Metro crowd, they are very helpful for those of us that like Metro and don't mind the dual usage of this product. My opinion might be skewed because I actually use it on a slate device but that slate device until now has been used rarely as a tablet and mostly as a mobile dockable PC. In that function, Windows 8 DP was pretty flexible and held a lot of promise. The consumer preview in the few hours I've spent with it has delivered on some of that promise. Still being a beta, there's a few small things missing such as I can't use my Zune Pass to stream music using the Music app and a couple of other small things but over all...I'm pretty happy. Microsoft, put me down for a copy of Windows 8.

PeterM42
PeterM42

.....on a desktop? - NO!

120529-000107
120529-000107

IT Pros are tired from trying to calculate the time, effort and money to upgrade their shops while maintaining functionality across all of the supported devices and applications. Most developers are tired from trying to absorb the new paradigm and retrofit their legacy applications so that functionality and productivity is maintained when users show up with Windows 8 and ask why their company's proprietary application or trusted older programs lack the slick new interface and interconnective messaging. And let's not forget those of us who are simply tired of reloads, backups, restores, updates, upgrades and patches across a seemingless endless ocean of machines. Or those who work the helpdesk and must learn to read minds of remote users who are essentially clueless as they wave their hands to and fro demanding instant answers. So rather than denigrating such people as immature or uninformed, I suggest that you live with the fact that it is our collective right to b*tch, p*ss and moan when a new operating system is introduced.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

No ARM yet - we will get one as soon as we can. I put Windows 8 on a Dell Inspiron Duo running an Atom CPU. It works fairly well - not a very good tablet regardless of OS, but the Metro Interface is pretty snappy even on an Atom. I used the same installation file for both devices, which is an accomplishment.

mjc5
mjc5

They just don't learn. Those stupid ribbons are why I left Office in the first place. I use Open office on all my machines and haven't looked back. If they have ribbons on W8, I'll just stick my Mac and Install Linux. on the 2 Windows machines I have left.

Skruis
Skruis

We still have our desktops and for most of us, that's what really matters. Microsoft took the start menu and simply made it graphical. I guess the only advantage for desktop users is easier integration with our mobile world (assuming you have a slate and a windows phone). If you don't, well, then you don't get that seamless experience Microsoft is going for. Perhaps let's say you had an iPad and yes, an iPad is a touch based device and has certain functions that are best left to the couch but could there ever be any data, stored in an app, that you wanted access to from your pc? Well, if your iPad was a windows 8 slate and you had Windows 8 on your desktop, you might just be able to get access to that data or use that app now under some common circumstances (data sync somehow, app developer used skydrive or some other webservice as storage backend, etc) so there are some possible niceties that come with having the ability to launch those apps on the pc. For slate users, Windows 8 offers much. You can use 1 device to walk around with and sit on the couch, then when you go to work, you can dock it, switch to the desktop and do all of your work...like I do. I use my win8 slate 90% of the time in docked mode and I can run all of my applications anywhere at any time without having to worry about remote access or cloud sync or anything else because my PC is with me, everywhere, it's not some separate entity that's kind of detached.

Skruis
Skruis

It was a similar change from program manager to the start button, then from "programs" to "all programs" and so on and so on. People freak out when they can't instantly find what they're looking for. It "might" help your users if you pre-arrange their start menu for them to put their frequently used "tiles" (shortcuts to desktop apps most likely) towards the left of the start menu then it's kind of obvious where it is... most users use 4-5 app's so that solution should work.

Skruis
Skruis

You just didn't read it thoroughly ;-)

120529-000107
120529-000107

I think I am becoming more concerned about the increasing intrusiveness and monitoring of a computer I own and which has independently acquired programs that are of no concern to the operating system vendor. I do not buy the concept of program inventories to improve the "user experience" or resolve crashes. I want to see an independent assessment of the security issue.

Skruis
Skruis

There's nothing stopping you from clicking the "desktop" tile and making all of your icons on the desktop...absolutely nothing. Well, on 2nd look, it's not exactly easy, is it? If you go to search, "apps", you see your applications and if you click on it, you can either choose "pin to start" or "pin to taskbar" (I happen to use the taskbar quite a bit so I'm satisfied with those options). Once pinned to the taskbar, you can drag the icon to the actual desktop to create your desktop icon. Microsoft should really add a "pin to desktop" button as well.

Craig_B
Craig_B

I agree with Skruis explanation of Microsoft's intent. It seems Microsoft wants you in there world and not anyone else???s. To that end they have made a system that integrates that world. To do this you need an interface that will work on all devices, so you go with the lowest common denominator (phone) interface and then tell everyone how wonderful life will be. Sounds like they have been drinking some Apple cider, instead of listening to what customers want. Apple tends to dictate what the world will be like, Microsoft was about choices, choice your hardware vendor, your applications, etc., and Linux is free and open and can flow in any direction. When testing Windows 7, I immediately saw it was a much improved OS over XP/Vista. Testing Windows 8 so far, I???m trying to figure out how it could fit into our environment and I???m not seeing that it does, at least so far. I will continue to test though it doesn???t appear to be the home run Win 7 was

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