Microsoft

Windows Longhorn Server (successor to Windows 2003 Server)


Not much has been said about Longhorn Server thus far with most of the talking aimed at the much anticipated Windows Vista (successor to Windows XP). Windows Longhorn Server is slated to arrive in 2007.

Windows Longhorn Server and Windows Vista really need to be homeruns for Microsoft. Failures here could open the floodgates for them to lose market share to other open source server alternatives.

Microsoft is under attack and they need a hit with Longhorn to keep the wolves at bay. Many companies are challenging the company in every market and it will take fortitude to stave off the competition with innovation and security to continue to rise to the top.

Their number one hurdle is security issues. Once they nail this point, they will be golden. I truly believe every company that runs Microsoft server and client products will benefit from upgrading on the security front.

The Longhorn product line will be a very secure release and will eliminate most of the malware and phishing garbage that plagues user desktops at the core. This time around, their success comes from design. They are not designing software and then fixing security issues. They are designing software with security on the forefront of the design.

When you design a product with security in mind, you will have a secure release; a release all IT organizations will be proud of. If Microsoft had done this with the Windows Server 2000 product line, they would not be under attack from so many companies fighting for leadership in the market.

Why Not, It's Free

Open source is a challenge to Microsoft as well with its volunteer base of developers that churn out code, and fix bugs and security issues faster than the Microsofties. To further the cause, IBM, Red Hat, Sun Microsystems and other large corporate behemoths are backing the open source movement with an influx of cash in hope of dethroning the Redmond Giant. To add to the fire, many venture capitalists are investing loads of cash into opens source startups.

All of this spells trouble for Microsoft.

Linux, for example, is touted as more secure and stable than Microsoft products. Well, I am here to say, not for long. Longhorn Server and Windows Vista will surprise the masses.

These next two-to-three years will be very important to Microsoft. Just as IBM became vulnerable in the 90’s, Microsoft is vulnerable in the new millennium.

Vulnerable does not mean defeated (their software is run by roughly 90% of all computers in the entire world). But for them to remain dominant, they need huge successes with their future products.

Why does all this matter to you?

As a decision maker in your company, you need to be aware that Microsoft’s upcoming Longhorn server product line is going to be a huge success, so don’t let the naysayer’s steer you off course. You’ve stuck with Microsoft this long through the bad—why not stay with them in the future through all the good?

27 comments
zczc2311
zczc2311

This is one of the most appalling 'technical' discussions I have ever seen made public by Techrepublic in its current form which should be pulled or not indexed so highly. This article indicates 1 truth, that Microsoft faces huge security issues with this product and has to get it right - first time. The conclusion, mentioned by may others comments, are nothing short of advertisement and filled with a pure emotive comment. None of us need to read emotive commentary on the forthcoming release of Microsoft new Server. The notion that any decision makers would choose to spend big dollars purely because "You?ve stuck with Microsoft this long through the bad?why not stay with them in the future through all the good?" This statement gives every IT Manager who purchases any software an excuse for there emotive handling of any decision about purchasing software. Microsoft is not the benchmark - Technical Excellencies are! No company in their right mind spends big dollars on anything that is based on emotion. Corporate decisions are based on fact, research and purchasing products that fulfil their companies requirements. As most corporate decisions are now measured against Quality Assurance Standards, this emotive statement has no place. Any IT decision maker who just accepts a product because it is made from Microsoft and therefore concludes there is nothing better and the best they can source without factually assessing every product, despite brand, needs to retire right now. Corporate IT decisions are based on technical objectives, the art department makes their decisions of what looks pretty.

Fil0403
Fil0403

No technical discussion exist in most posts bashing Microsoft products and I don't see people (you included) writing 11 paragraphs complaining.

shinderpaljandu
shinderpaljandu

Can I ask a simple question. Why. What are the advantages of Vista /Longhorn ? Few programs yet even demand or require XP. All there seems to be some minor visual enhancements - gee wiz - and not even that that can be easily be provided by 3rd parties whose programs are much less demanding. I agree that new computer liscences will be structured as to make vista the only option but even then - other than financial what are the advantages. The emperors clothes yet again. The basis of Microsoft s marketing is "You cannot live without it". Vintage computer manuals www.glendalegolf.som www.vintagecomputermanuals.com

pdavis7
pdavis7

I agree. As a smaller organization, we cannot just adopt a new OS whether it be for the desktop or for servers. We have to adhere to what our apps can run on. Being a smaller organization we also cannot implement a test environment. We know what we have now works. What about training on the new OS? Does MS think we have endless amounts of cash? The hardware requirments for Vista are beyond about 60% of our workstations and no we cannot just go out and purchase new ones. For us as an organization, Longhorn is years away.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

This is speculation and some commentary to get us to think about what Longhorn might be... Jeez...

honfaing
honfaing

...but thanks for showing us your almost religious devotion to a profit-making organisation.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

I do not think there is anything wrong with making a profit. Do you? In fact the next time your employer offers you a raise because your company made a profit,turn it down. If you do then I can understand your disdain towards all things profitable. If not, please jump off the bandwagon.

roaming
roaming

Thank you for your time and attention.

ssandstrom
ssandstrom

Wow... that's pretty good press for a product that hasn't even hit public beta yet... I've been an infrastructure engineer for 18 years now, and I have been burned many, many times by MS's line "This time, we PROMISE we'll make it better"... The problem with having, as you point out, 90% market share, is that they don't have to worry... if they loose 10% to Linux, they still make billions. Look at Novell. In the late 80's and early 90's, NetWare was far more secure and stable than any Windows server. Yet, the corporations of the world were afraid NOT to use Windows platforms. I look forward to a secure, stable Windows platform. Am I holding my breath??? Nope!

verd
verd

I just want to say that I think that Microsoft is always improving their products. Sometimes it is hard to keep up with. Their products are the industry standard and the only thing it really means to me is that I will have to learn a new OS once again and take more MS test. I look forward to the new OS's server and Vista. They are going to come through in the end. As far as Linux goes do not think that I have never used it or am not using it as I do both. I have ran both for years and still like MS better. SO all you MS bashers should keep an open mind and try everything out. You are supposed to be computer IT people and that means you learn to run everything. Even if it OS10 or FreeBSD or whatever. Learn them all!

Jonathan.G.Shilling
Jonathan.G.Shilling

Although MS has gotten better, they are still behind the times when you compare them to Novell. Yes I admin MS servers, and I run Linux at home. I just wish that there had been something interesting to read in this article. It's sad to say that I have found the comments ABOUT the article much more enlightening and entertaing than the article itself. 'nuff said.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Oh wait, no they just bought them off because they see the writing on the wall. With the flop of the Zune and the future flop of Vista, the stock holders aren't gonna be happy. Steve Ballmer is going to be replaced as well as a lot of the top level execs.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

Who cares about Novell....My blog isnt about Novell and Novell doesnt have the marketshare that Microsoft has. They are done. nuff said.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

No, I am not a MS Salesman and just as the article states, there is not much out on Longhorn to date so how much could one say? I am speculating and if you read the blog, it states Microsoft needs a homerun. I believe in Microsoft and am passionate about their software. Ease up!

Dman11
Dman11

Is the writer of this article an MS Salesman ?> The whole article is devoid of fact an seems to be nothing more that and generalistic plug for MS products. I totally agree with the last post, the responses are far more interesting then the article. I am just suprised that this particular bit of fluff made it past the editor of the site, surely he/she would have seen the article for what it is, empty !

gsquared
gsquared

Does this entry read like an advertisement intentionally? "You've stuck with them through the bad, why not stick with them through the good?" Does it get sillier than this? I started reading this entry with the hope it would actually discus some point of Longhorn. A feature. A design point. A security test. Something. Instead, it tells me, "they've messed up horribly, but, trust me, the next version will totally rock". It doesn't actually say anything at all about why it will rock, or why this trust should be forthcoming. It just reads like a marketing release, but without the usual feature-bragging. I beta tested Vista and am using the RTM version now (TechNet subscription gets you an eval copy of the RTM version of Vista). I've posted a number of times about Vista (just look at some of the discussions about the built in desktop search for examples). I am about to start beta testing Longhorn. Once I have some use data on it, I'll see about posting something. If I do, it certainly won't be as empty as the post I'm replying to.

Fil0403
Fil0403

The post is not more empty than the posts of people who bash Longhorn.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

I am passionate about Microsoft software and always have been. That is why I love to write about Windows products. I am glad you are just about to start beta testing Longhorn. I have been working with it for months. You will Love IIS and the additions to Terminal Server such as published applications and the secure gateway. Looking forward to reading some of your stuff. Shoot me the link when you write something.

cchipman
cchipman

That was one of the biggest fluff pieces I've ever read. I'm sorry I clicked on the link.

savantmgr
savantmgr

I've never understood the psychology of tearing down a company that is used by more than 90% of the world? Instead of making empty comments about the obvious lack of technical expertise by the reviewer, why not give some meat to your comments with facts. The honest truth of the matter is Microsoft is doing something right, or they are good hypnotists? Any company who is willing to train the masses on their products for FREE, and produces more successful people than any government can, is surely doing something right. Watch out when BG runs for POUSA. I'll leave my personal comments to myself, I'm too busy learning the product so I can stand on the bandstand. DeLuccie

gsquared
gsquared

In no way was my post a tear-down of MS. I was asking why the review had no information in it. None. Not a single datum beyond the name of the product. The post I was replying to didn't have anything substantive to say. Just marketing-style, "our product doesn't exist yet, but when it does, it will be really, really cool". From the title, I was seriously hoping for some information about Longhorn. I'm about to begin beta testing it. (I've downloaded it and will be setting up the machine for it this weekend.) Some information about caveats, cool features, installation/set-up tips, etc., would have been really quite nice and very welcome. There weren't any. As far as MS and their software: I use a ton of it. I like Windows. I liked '95 when it came out. I liked '98 when it came out. I loved upgrading from 98 to XP. I beta tested Vista and am using a RTM preview right now. I don't think I'll have the budget to upgrade "the minute Vista comes out", but as soon after that as I can budget it, I'll use it. It's not that I love Microsoft, but I do find their products get the job done that I need to get done. That's why I was hoping for some useful information about Longhorn, not just statements about, "we know it's been bad, but it will be good soon". That's what the article said, not me.

Vetch_101
Vetch_101

I have to say the whole "train the masses on their products for FREE" line doesn't work for me. They train people on their products for "free" so that people buy their products for huge sums of money. The Open Source community offers their software for free, and also provides support for free too. I know which I feel is more laudable...

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

MS only makes up about 50% (at best) of the server market and at best 90% of the desktop market, but figure is probably high. Also, most of the EU is moving to *nix as well as the entire country of China. Don't forget that it looks like India may be moving to *nix as well and we have some late comers in the US (like the NSA) moving more towards Linux. * The desktop market is probably pumped from the fact that is is REALLY hard to buy a naked PC. How many people buy a PC then put Linux on it?

sjpostsr
sjpostsr

I would love to see training sites for MS products are free. Everything that comes out of MS costs money.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

I am doing a lot of work with IIS and Longhorn. I am not ready to talk about it just yet. I will be posting lots of stuff on IIS 7 and Longhorn in the future.

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