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C Pound, C Sharp, or C tic tac toe????

By LarryD4 ·
Ok so I was talking to my boss the other day and I said something about the C pound runtime libraries and he corrected me by saying, you mean C Sharp.
I laughed and ignored it, since it was coming from someone who doesn't program and from someone with no musical background.

I have heard lots of people call it different things, so I ask the community, what do you call it?

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C#

by jgarcia102066 In reply to C Pound, C Sharp, or C ti ...

When referencing the Microsoft Programming Language as in the C# runtime libraries...it is C-Sharp.

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Musical reference

by Geek3001 In reply to C Pound, C Sharp, or C ti ...

<p>I've heard it called C Sharp, the pound sign also being a musical reference.</p>

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Neither- C Hash mark or octothorpe

by Oz_Media In reply to C Pound, C Sharp, or C ti ...

It's a hash mark. LOL

Well for UK correspondence it is a hashmark, out here I generally use pound as it is recognized that way due to telecom.

When I say pound to Brits many of them ask if I mean a dollar or a hashmark.

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C Sharp. Edited

by CharlieSpencer In reply to C Pound, C Sharp, or C ti ...

That's okay, I've got a buddy who pronounces long-E 'Ethernet' with a short-E, like the 'e' in 'theft'.

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Very common

by Oz_Media In reply to C Sharp. Edited

Again I think it's just a regional thing, some say potato, others say potatoe. okay it doesn't work unless verbal but you know what I mean. :)

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It is in fact C Sharp

by jmgarvin In reply to C Pound, C Sharp, or C ti ...
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MSDN agrees but that's not fact either

by Oz_Media In reply to It is in fact C Sharp

It's just another analogy based on what MS deemed C# (sharp) programming language.

The key/symol is called something different regionally though, Microsoft didn't invent keyboards and neither did MSN magazine.

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But the creator of the language gets to name it...

by jmgarvin In reply to MSDN agrees but that's no ...

We need some convention. So, I'll stick with C sharp.

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Oh, well in that case it's 'pound' then

by Oz_Media In reply to But the creator of the la ...

It was a symbol used in telecom many moons before Bill Gates was even a twinkle in his daddy's drunken eyes. Many moons before that it was a musical notation (yes for sharp but that doesn't translate to computing nor give Microsoft ownership for calling a programming language C-Sharp).

Outside of music, it's main use was with telecom keypads, where the POUND sign took on it's modern day name.
So why would some software engineer, who updates a program and uses an ancient symol in it's name, get to rename that symbol itself?

That's like renaming the @ (AT) symbol the email symbol just because it's used to send email. Ignoring the fact that it has been around for many years before computing was even a science fiction dream.

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Actually, Oz

by NickNielsen In reply to Oh, well in that case it' ...

Outside of music, it's main use was with telecom keypads, where the POUND sign took on it's modern day name.

I remember schlepping home cuts of meat from the butcher block at the corner grocery. Every one of those was marked 1# or 1/2# or 3/4#, with # being the symbol for pounds (in weight). That the same word identifies the proper way to use early keypads is no doubt only fortuitous circumstance. ;\

etu

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