General discussion

Locked

COBOL to JAVA transition

By skyyguy1 ·
I have over 7 years experience in mainframe technologies and about 2 years experience supporting client/server applications. I have taught myself C well enough to be able to understand the code, however I have not had any opportunities to do any actual coding. My company recently sent me to a few java training classes, but then decided not to pursue java because of time/expense issues (don't ask). Although we use currently use VB/C++ for some development, this area is not an option because my company only wants to use experienced people on these development projects.

My question is.. how do you make the get the experience everyone is searching for? My own company, after spending money on training, would rather hire experienced consultants to do the job than work with existing employees to make the transition.

Any suggestions for how to proceed. I live in the Chicago area and realize a pay cut may be necessary given my lack of development skills w/ OO related programming. However, I believe my general programming skills, along with problem-solving and troubleshooting ability are valuable no matter what the language/technology.

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

3 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Do you really want to do Java?

by hingram In reply to COBOL to JAVA transition

I've written some Java stuff and I never developed (yuk) a love for it. I certainly wouldn't want to attach my career to it.

Collapse -

It was tough for me too

by Hakan Berg In reply to COBOL to JAVA transition

I had been working with COBOL, assemblers and hardware for a long time, when I suddenly found myself together with a lot of other unemployed people in the crisis we had here in Sweden in the early 90's. I gathered some experience programming the Amiga in CanDo, a tool like a rudimentary Visual Basic. It was very hard to get into the world of graphic interface and object orientate programming. A company needed teachers teaching Mirosoft Office, and I phoned the VD. To him I said: 'I know nothingabout the PC, but the best way to learn is to teach.' He hired me. I teached. I had to write books on the subject just to have something to give my students, so I had to learn fast. My last few bucks often went to books (that was before everything was available on the Internet). I exchanged my programs for Windows 3.11 technical manuals. I also started a course in C++ and object orientated programming, and after having written 8 books on the subject, and after teaching several hundred pupils I finally got the hang of it. I beleave I helped a lot of people there, but mostly I helped myself, because today I have an interesting job as an Internet programmer. I do not envy you, you have a gigantic leap ahead of you, but to me it was worth it. I love working as a programmer.

Collapse -

Try and get lucky

by WindmillF8 In reply to COBOL to JAVA transition

Most companies won't transition existing IT staff because they're [seen as] too old, too set in the old ways, or "we've got to get up and running NOW." All BS reasons, but that's the story. One **** of a waste of expertise and loyalty.

-----
My question is.. how do you make the get the experience everyone is searching for? My own company, after spending money on training, would rather hire experienced consultants to do the job than work with existing employees to make the transition.
-----

That's the PHB factor: buzzword-oriented, they won't retrain proven staff but will go for newer (and probably cheaper) folks that have the buzzwords. Not much you can do, except hope that when the PHBs get hosed in a downsizing or realignment,they appreciate what it's like to be hosed. And they wonder why IT people job-hop!

Back to IT Employment Forum
3 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

General Discussion Forums