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Computer will not maintain internet connection.

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2 Votes

Computer will not maintain internet connection.

Kwahn
I started having this issue on Saturday all of a sudden. At first, my computer would connect, but anything related to the internet was very slow. Now it just refuses to connect. Occasionally it will connect, and say internet is available, but any programs related to the internet (I.E. browsers) remain non,functional.

I've tried to connect from multiple locations, all of which give me the same problem. My network connectivity issues continue even in Safe Mode with Networking. I have not tried to connect to a router directly via an ethernet cord, but I know that my computer has wireless capabilities even in safe mode w/Networking, it connected wirelessly just fine during the first day.

I am running Windows Vista Home Premium (6.0, Build 6002)

Ping attempts provide no results.
I have tried reinstalling network drivers to no effect.
Full virus and malware scans have been performed in safe mode, with no effect.
Performed system recovery to go back to a previous state, but it didn't work.
Netsh reboot did not work.


IPconfig /renew gives the following message: An error occurred while renewing interface Wireless Network Connection : Unable to contact your DHCP server. request has timed out.
No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection while it has its media disconnected. (Same for Local Area Connection 2 and bluetooth network connection.)
An error occurred while releasing interface Loopback pseudo-interface 1 : The system cannot find the file specified.

I'm at a loss of what else to do. I'll try to plug my computer directly into the internet via an ethernet cord, but I strongly suspect it will not work. Any other suggestions and fixes are welcome.

Member Comments

    • +
      0 Votes
      Michael Jay

      look into the network configuration and clear any static ip addresses.

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      1 Votes
      Greybeard770

      Has there been any environment changes that might affect wireless? That could be a new cordless phone, new close neighbor, new electronic something. I was thinking maybe you had a power saving option of cutting power to your NICs to extend battery life but since it's kind of sudden I would tend to rule that out. I generally consider that option a bad idea.
      Try it hardwired to your router.

      +
      0 Votes
      mjd420nova

      Yes, first check with an ethernet CAT5 cable to the first wired port on the router. If things still fail, move the CAT5 cable directly to the modem ethernet port. Any faults there are the modems failure, not the router. Many environmental changes can affect WIFI reception, moving furniture, even a recent installation of a neighbors router is interfering. Try downloading and running inSSIDer, that will let you see all routers in range and show a channel lineup to see which if any are interfering.

      +
      0 Votes
      kmthom

      Which I am...I would almost guarantee your router is on its last leg; assuming it is a consumer based home router. Usually when something magically stops working its a hardware issue - barring any ninja updates by Microsoft that managed to cripple your wireless card. Or real ninjas that have infiltrated your house and munged up your internet settings.

      I would begin the trouble shooting process by resetting everything back the way it was before you had trouble and PLUGGING your computer directly to the internet link you have. In the event you have a separate modem device (Cable or DSL) this is easy. Plug it in, wait for DHCP to assign your IP and you are good to go. If you can't do this because your modem and router are one unit, then head to McDonalds...yes...McDonalds.

      Order up a Big Mac and try to get on their free WiFi. By the time that first glob of special sauce lands on your shirt you will know if the problem is your laptop or not. If your laptop is able to connect then head home and call your ISP, because the problem is not anywhere on your laptop. (This is all assuming you were not able to get onto the internet directly, without your router, of course.)

      However, if you have a spare router around, give it a try. Like I said before it's probably your router. The consumer based routers are pumped out by the zillions and they break FAR more often then they should. A year or so ago the Internet port went out on mine and I had spent $80 on it. It never moved from its spot, and I only had it for a year previous to that; it just decided to stop working one day.

      Anyways, good luck to you. Let us know how it turns out!

      -=K=-

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      0 Votes
      Kwahn

      I guess I didn't make it clear last time, so I'll go into a little more detail.

      I do not use a home connection. My laptop is moved from connection to connection throughout the city in which I live. It has this problem in all locations, no matter where I'm sitting, with nobody else seeming to have any similar issues. Furthermore, I can use another computer with no problems what so ever.

      For that same reason... I generally can't plug a CAT5 or Ethernet cable into any routers or modems owned by the places where I get my internet access... I could try to plug it in at home, but that'll be something that I have to do when I get there, not something I can do here.

      I'll try Ipconfig /release and see if that does anything when I'm able to, and then try to renew it again.

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      0 Votes
      kmthom

      Yeah, plug it in when you get home and that will at least tell you if it is your wireless adapter acting up.

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      0 Votes
      markp24

      You may want to confirm the wireless radio is enabled, on some laptops you can have wireless showing enabled in the task bar, but theres a switch or keyboard combo (ie fn F2) that will power off the wireless radio, yet windows still shows the device enabled (which from windows side it is).

      check that , it may be the issue (i had that occur on an ibm think pad, and a Dell Inspiron)

      +
      0 Votes
      pcrx_greg

      You might try taking the bottom panel off of you notebook to see if the wireless antenna leads may have popped loose from the wireless card. If they come loose, you would get a little signal while close to the router but not much.
      Good Luck.

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      0 Votes
      texadactyl

      [pre]
      I agree with kmthom6 reply #2 above. Definitely try testing with a wired ethernet connection.

      I am flying blind here but if wired connectivity functions well, then your wireless hardware probably needs hands-on attention. If that becomes a $$$ motherboard repair/replacement issue, get a second opinion. E.g. there are USB adapter solutions (admittedly, a band-aid) that could save you from repairing/replacing the laptop hardware.

      Do you have a computer pal handy? This really needs eyes-on attention.

      Also, you never mentioned the laptop make and model. (-:
      [/pre]

      +
      0 Votes
      CompHelpNJ

      I have two suggestions: 1) Make certain the wireless radio switch on your laptop is turned on, and 2) For under $50 you can purchase a USB Wireless adapter. This will bypass the internal wireless adapter which apparently has issues.

      +
      0 Votes
      markp24

      You may want to confirm the wireless radio is enabled, on some laptops you can have wireless showing enabled in the task bar, but theres a switch or keyboard combo (ie fn F2) that will power off the wireless radio, yet windows still shows the device enabled (which from windows side it is).

      check that , it may be the issue (i had that occur on an ibm think pad, and a Dell Inspiron)

    • +
      0 Votes
      Michael Jay

      look into the network configuration and clear any static ip addresses.

      +
      1 Votes
      Greybeard770

      Has there been any environment changes that might affect wireless? That could be a new cordless phone, new close neighbor, new electronic something. I was thinking maybe you had a power saving option of cutting power to your NICs to extend battery life but since it's kind of sudden I would tend to rule that out. I generally consider that option a bad idea.
      Try it hardwired to your router.

      +
      0 Votes
      mjd420nova

      Yes, first check with an ethernet CAT5 cable to the first wired port on the router. If things still fail, move the CAT5 cable directly to the modem ethernet port. Any faults there are the modems failure, not the router. Many environmental changes can affect WIFI reception, moving furniture, even a recent installation of a neighbors router is interfering. Try downloading and running inSSIDer, that will let you see all routers in range and show a channel lineup to see which if any are interfering.

      +
      0 Votes
      kmthom

      Which I am...I would almost guarantee your router is on its last leg; assuming it is a consumer based home router. Usually when something magically stops working its a hardware issue - barring any ninja updates by Microsoft that managed to cripple your wireless card. Or real ninjas that have infiltrated your house and munged up your internet settings.

      I would begin the trouble shooting process by resetting everything back the way it was before you had trouble and PLUGGING your computer directly to the internet link you have. In the event you have a separate modem device (Cable or DSL) this is easy. Plug it in, wait for DHCP to assign your IP and you are good to go. If you can't do this because your modem and router are one unit, then head to McDonalds...yes...McDonalds.

      Order up a Big Mac and try to get on their free WiFi. By the time that first glob of special sauce lands on your shirt you will know if the problem is your laptop or not. If your laptop is able to connect then head home and call your ISP, because the problem is not anywhere on your laptop. (This is all assuming you were not able to get onto the internet directly, without your router, of course.)

      However, if you have a spare router around, give it a try. Like I said before it's probably your router. The consumer based routers are pumped out by the zillions and they break FAR more often then they should. A year or so ago the Internet port went out on mine and I had spent $80 on it. It never moved from its spot, and I only had it for a year previous to that; it just decided to stop working one day.

      Anyways, good luck to you. Let us know how it turns out!

      -=K=-

      +
      0 Votes
      Kwahn

      I guess I didn't make it clear last time, so I'll go into a little more detail.

      I do not use a home connection. My laptop is moved from connection to connection throughout the city in which I live. It has this problem in all locations, no matter where I'm sitting, with nobody else seeming to have any similar issues. Furthermore, I can use another computer with no problems what so ever.

      For that same reason... I generally can't plug a CAT5 or Ethernet cable into any routers or modems owned by the places where I get my internet access... I could try to plug it in at home, but that'll be something that I have to do when I get there, not something I can do here.

      I'll try Ipconfig /release and see if that does anything when I'm able to, and then try to renew it again.

      +
      0 Votes
      kmthom

      Yeah, plug it in when you get home and that will at least tell you if it is your wireless adapter acting up.

      +
      0 Votes
      markp24

      You may want to confirm the wireless radio is enabled, on some laptops you can have wireless showing enabled in the task bar, but theres a switch or keyboard combo (ie fn F2) that will power off the wireless radio, yet windows still shows the device enabled (which from windows side it is).

      check that , it may be the issue (i had that occur on an ibm think pad, and a Dell Inspiron)

      +
      0 Votes
      pcrx_greg

      You might try taking the bottom panel off of you notebook to see if the wireless antenna leads may have popped loose from the wireless card. If they come loose, you would get a little signal while close to the router but not much.
      Good Luck.

      +
      0 Votes
      texadactyl

      [pre]
      I agree with kmthom6 reply #2 above. Definitely try testing with a wired ethernet connection.

      I am flying blind here but if wired connectivity functions well, then your wireless hardware probably needs hands-on attention. If that becomes a $$$ motherboard repair/replacement issue, get a second opinion. E.g. there are USB adapter solutions (admittedly, a band-aid) that could save you from repairing/replacing the laptop hardware.

      Do you have a computer pal handy? This really needs eyes-on attention.

      Also, you never mentioned the laptop make and model. (-:
      [/pre]

      +
      0 Votes
      CompHelpNJ

      I have two suggestions: 1) Make certain the wireless radio switch on your laptop is turned on, and 2) For under $50 you can purchase a USB Wireless adapter. This will bypass the internal wireless adapter which apparently has issues.

      +
      0 Votes
      markp24

      You may want to confirm the wireless radio is enabled, on some laptops you can have wireless showing enabled in the task bar, but theres a switch or keyboard combo (ie fn F2) that will power off the wireless radio, yet windows still shows the device enabled (which from windows side it is).

      check that , it may be the issue (i had that occur on an ibm think pad, and a Dell Inspiron)