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cyber Law

By shailesh_gajera ·
I have a new idea regarding an e-Venture but I have financial and management problem therefore I contacted IT companies like Infosys, Wipro, Microland, Aptech, NIIT, Netacross etc. They are ready to invest but they told me to send the business planfor review. As you know an idea plays a vital role in a dotcom.
Therefore, I feel fear if I submit my business idea to them, first they will get my ideas and detail information, and then say they are not interested in this proposal and develop this venture themselves.
Is there any security by cyber law?
How can I protect my business plan by law?

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cyber Law

by RealGem In reply to cyber Law

The simplest answer is put privacy restrictions (e.g. confidentiality notices, copyrights, etc.) on your business plan document, and make sure that they sign and date copies of the plan. This will allow you to provide proof that you presented them with the idea. None of this will prevent them from stealing it of course, but it should give you some recourse.

I also suggest that you consult a lawyer. The intellectual property area is growing and resulting in lots of conflicts and lawsuits.Find someone who is current on these issues. It may cost you some $$, but it's probably a good risk mitigation strategy.

You could also search the web for business plans and templates that address this security issue.

Good luck.

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cyber Law

by shailesh_gajera In reply to cyber Law

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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cyber Law

by McKayTech In reply to cyber Law

There is no special protection for "cyber" ideas, but the general categories of protection for ideas are copyright, patent and contractual (e.g. non-disclosure/confidentiality agreements).

I would recommend getting advice from a Patents & Trademarks attorney as to which form of protection is most appropriate. A well-drafted Non-Disclosure Agreement is the likely recommendation and is not usually too expensive to have prepared.

paul

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cyber Law

by shailesh_gajera In reply to cyber Law

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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cyber Law

by Rindunel In reply to cyber Law

Well now. Regardless of the fact that I just finished the Law University, there are some aspects that must be on your mind before proceding to any "ideea" disclosures. The most important one is the applicable law. You see, around the world, different states have different copyright laws, and the manner they impose those laws are not the same. For instance, in Romania, the country I'm from, there is no legal protection for the ideeas. On the other hand, the general aspect of an GUI might be subject to some protection through the Romanian Patent & Copyright Office. So... The first thing you must keep in mind is 'your aplicable law' and, if the companies you intend to deal with are from the same area the general tems of protection will apply without doubt. If not, and the contract would receive a, let's say, "trans-national" character then you will have to choose which of the law is more protective to you, and enforce it by contractual means. In either case, you must do what I recommend to all in your situation. Hire a damn lawyer, although it may seem a bit expansive or even trivial, he is the one that will watch your six in time of needs. In the end, keep this in mind: 1. you are the one that wants legal protection; 2. Which law will be applicable; 3. Ferm contractual clauses will eradicate any conflict even before they appear.

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cyber Law

by shailesh_gajera In reply to cyber Law

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by Ben P M Laauwen (CMC) In reply to cyber Law

As your Romanian friend points out: the applicable law is the crucial issue. E-commerce operates in a world without boundaries. I reckon that it will be almost impossible to protect you from the risk you are running. The best protection is to deal with a honorable partner, sell the idea in its infancy. Less money, but better one in the hand than ten in the bush. Retain the right to the idea and develop it yourself. You are more likely to progress faster than any buyer. Your initial partner could come back for you to buy your "progress".

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by shailesh_gajera In reply to cyber Law

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by shailesh_gajera In reply to cyber Law

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