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difference b/w router, switch and hub

By bist_shweta ·
What is the diffrence between router and switch and a hub ? Where are these 3 used ?

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by darts32 In reply to difference b/w router, sw ...

Router: A device that determines the next network point to which a data packet should be forwarded enroute toward its destination. The router is connected to at least two networks and determines which way to send each data packet based on its current understanding of the state of the networks it is connected to. Routers create or maintain a table of the available routes and use this information to determine the best route for a given data packet.

Switch: A device that improves network performance by segmenting the network and reducing competition for bandwidth. When a switch port receives data packets, it forwards those packets only to the appropriate port for the intended recipient. This further reduces competition for bandwidth between the clients, servers or workgroups connected to each switch port.

Hub: A multi-port device that enables more than one network computer or device to be connected to a home or business network.

Uses:

Routers: Allow you to share a single IP address among multiple network clients. Isolate each LAN into a separate subnet for large networks to have more than 254 clients.

Switches: Switches can be used in heavily loaded networks to isolate data flow and improve performance.

Hubs: Like a switch but traffic flows to all ports instead of just the one that has requested the information. Can be used to regenerate or replicate a signal.

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by dryflies In reply to difference b/w router, sw ...

A router routes traffic between different networks. A switch filters traffic so that traffic destined for one of its ports is sent to that port. other packets are discarded. A hub takes all traffic that comes in and retransmits it out all of its ports.

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by sharma_mbd In reply to

A router is a device that forwards data packets along networks. A router is connected to at least two networks, commonly two LANs or WANs or a LAN and its ISP's network. Routers are located at gateways, the places where two or more networks connect, and are the critical device that keeps data flowing between networks and keeps the networks connected to the Internet. When data is sent between locations on one network or from one network to a second network the data is always seen and directed to the correct location by the router. They accomplish his by using headers and forwarding tables to determine the best path for forwarding the data packets, and they use protocols such as ICMP to communicate with each other and configure the best route between any two hosts.

Why Would I Need a Router?
=============================
For most home users, they may want to set-up a LAN (local Area Network) or WLAN (wireless LAN) and connect all computers to the Internet without having to pay a full broadband subscription service to their ISP for each computer on the network. In many instances, an ISP will allow you to use a router and connect multiple computers to a single Internet connection and pay a nominal fee for each additional computer sharing the connection. This is when home users will want to look at smaller routers, often called broadband routers that enable two or more computers to share an Internet connection. Within a business or organization, you may need to connect multiple computers to the Internet, but also want to connect multiple private networks ? and these are the types of functions a router is designed for.

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by sharma_mbd In reply to

A router is a device that forwards data packets along networks. A router is connected to at least two networks, commonly two LANs or WANs or a LAN and its ISP's network. Routers are located at gateways, the places where two or more networks connect, and are the critical device that keeps data flowing between networks and keeps the networks connected to the Internet. When data is sent between locations on one network or from one network to a second network the data is always seen and directed to the correct location by the router. They accomplish his by using headers and forwarding tables to determine the best path for forwarding the data packets, and they use protocols such as ICMP to communicate with each other and configure the best route between any two hosts.

Why Would I Need a Router?
=============================
For most home users, they may want to set-up a LAN (local Area Network) or WLAN (wireless LAN) and connect all computers to the Internet without having to pay a full broadband subscription service to their ISP for each computer on the network. In many instances, an ISP will allow you to use a router and connect multiple computers to a single Internet connection and pay a nominal fee for each additional computer sharing the connection. This is when home users will want to look at smaller routers, often called broadband routers that enable two or more computers to share an Internet connection. Within a business or organization, you may need to connect multiple computers to the Internet, but also want to connect multiple private networks ? and these are the types of functions a router is designed for.

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by jmgarvin In reply to difference b/w router, sw ...

I'm guessing this is homework, so I'm going to be a little vague.
Hub: A "dumb" hardware device. It is a way to connect more than one node together with other nodes. In a very simplistic way, think of it as a mux. Usually good for small office settings to connect a small number of computers together.

Switch: A switch is smarter than a hub and can control the flow of traffic on a network. The idea of a switch is that it acts in a similar respect to that of a circuit switch. To help understand a packet switch you might want to look up virtual channel, virtual path, and virtual circuit. Mostly used in larger networks where you need a more structured network.

Router: A router decides how best to move traffic from network A to network B. Routers typically "know" who their neighbors are and usually try to find the shortest path. Usually used to talk between networks and sometimes as the final exiting node from the intranet to the internet.

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Diferences

by coolfrnd2me In reply to difference b/w router, sw ...

HUB: unintellegent device
Switch: intellengent device
Router: communaties b/w 2 different networks

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